Fixed sums paid regularly to individuals.
Insurance designed to compensate persons who lose wages because of illness or injury; insurance providing periodic payments that partially replace lost wages, salary, or other income when the insured is unable to work because of illness, injury, or disease. Individual and group disability insurance are two types of such coverage. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p207)
The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.
Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.
An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)
1861-1865 conflict between the Union (Northern states) and the 11 Southern states that seceded and were organized as the Confederate States of America.
Government sponsored social insurance programs.
Assessment of physiological capacities in relation to job requirements. It is usually done by measuring certain physiological (e.g., circulatory and respiratory) variables during a gradually increasing workload until specific limitations occur with respect to those variables.
Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.
Disorders claimed as a result of military service.
Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.
Training of the mentally or physically disabled in work skills so they may be returned to regular employment utilizing these skills.
Pathological processes of the ear, the hearing, and the equilibrium system of the body.
Statement of the position requirements, qualifications for the position, wage range, and any special conditions expected of the employee.
A 1974 Federal act which preempts states' rights with regard to workers' pension benefits and employee benefits. It does not affect the benefits and rights of employees whose employer is self-insured. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993)
The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.
Resumption of normal work routine following a hiatus or period of absence due to injury, disability, or other reasons.
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
Use for articles on the investing of funds for income or profit.
A framework through which the United Kingdom's National Health Service organizations are accountable for continually improving the quality of their services and safeguarding high standards of care by creating an environment in which excellence in clinical care will flourish. (Scally and Donaldson, BMJ (4 July 1998): 61-65)
Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.
Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.
Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)
Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.
Place or physical location of work or employment.
Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.