A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.
Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.
A change or shift in personnel due to reorganization, resignation, or discharge.
The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.
Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
Dedication or commitment shown by employees to organizations or institutions where they work.
Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.
Compensatory plans designed to motivate physicians in relation to patient referral, physician recruitment, and efficient use of the health facility.
The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.
Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Delivery of health services via remote telecommunications. This includes interactive consultative and diagnostic services.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.
Individuals licensed to practice medicine.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
Movable or portable facilities in which diagnostic and therapeutic services are provided to the community.
Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.
Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.
Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.
Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.
An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.
A course of action or principle adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or individual that concerns human interactions with nature and natural resources.
The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.