Congenital structural abnormalities of the LOWER EXTREMITY.
Congenital structural abnormalities of the UPPER EXTREMITY.
The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.
Deformities acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease. The joint deformity is often associated with rheumatoid arthritis and leprosy.
Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.
The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.
The region of the upper limb in animals, extending from the deltoid region to the HAND, and including the ARM; AXILLA; and SHOULDER.
Deformities of the hand, or a part of the hand, acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease.
The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.
General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.
The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Alterations or deviations from normal shape or size which result in a disfigurement of the foot occurring at or before birth.
Abnormalities of the nose acquired after birth from injury or disease.
The bones of the upper and lower LEG. They include the PELVIC BONES.
A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.
A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.
Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)
An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Bone lengthening by gradual mechanical distraction. An external fixation device produces the distraction across the bone plate. The technique was originally applied to long bones but in recent years the method has been adapted for use with mandibular implants in maxillofacial surgery.
A serotype of botulinum toxins that has specificity for cleavage of SYNAPTOSOMAL-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 25.
Drugs used for their actions on skeletal muscle. Included are agents that act directly on skeletal muscle, those that alter neuromuscular transmission (NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKING AGENTS), and drugs that act centrally as skeletal muscle relaxants (MUSCLE RELAXANTS, CENTRAL). Drugs used in the treatment of movement disorders are ANTI-DYSKINESIA AGENTS.
The pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles that make up the upper and fore part of the chest in front of the AXILLA.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Anatomical and functional disorders affecting the foot.
The region of the lower limb between the FOOT and the LEG.
The forepart of the foot including the metatarsals and the TOES.
The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.
Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.
The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.
A republic in eastern Africa, on the Gulf of Aden at the entrance to the Red Sea. Djibouti is also the name of its capital.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.
A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.
Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.
A family of membrane-anchored glycoproteins that contain a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain. They are responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many transmembrane proteins and the release of their extracellular domain.
A disorder present in the newborn infant in which constriction rings or bands, causing soft tissue depressions, encircle digits, extremities, or limbs and sometimes the neck, thorax, or abdomen. They may be associated with intrauterine amputations.
An overuse injury causing lateral knee pain that results from repetitive friction of the iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle.
A mixed mesenchymal tumor composed of two or more mesodermal cellular elements not commonly associated, not counting fibrous tissue as one of the elements. Mesenchymomas are widely distributed in the body and about 75% are malignant. (Dorland, 27th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)
Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.
Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.
Institutions with permanent facilities and organized medical staff which provide the full range of hospital services primarily to a neighborhood area.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Travel by a group of physicians for the purpose of making a special study or undertaking a special project of short-term duration.