Any group of three or more full-time physicians organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of health care services, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.
An organized group of three or more full-time physicians rendering services for a fixed prepayment.
Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
Any group of three or more full-time dentists, organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of dental care, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.
The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.
Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.
A voluntary contract between two or more doctors who may or may not share responsibility for the care of patients, with proportional sharing of profits and losses.
Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)
Individuals responsible for various duties pertaining to the medical office routine.
Individuals who receive patients in a medical office.
The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.
The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.
Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.
Prepaid health and hospital insurance plan.
An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.
Professional practice as an employee or contractee of a health care institution.
Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.
Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.
Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.
Hospitals organized and controlled by a group of physicians who practice together and provide each other with mutual support.
Individuals licensed to practice medicine.
A formal financial agreement made between one or more physicians and a hospital to provide ambulatory alternative services to those patients who do not require hospitalization.
Use of all social work processes in the treatment of patients in a psychiatric or mental health setting.
The simultaneous use of multiple laboratory procedures for the detection of various diseases. These are usually performed on groups of people.
Health care provided to individuals.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.
A method of payment for health services in which an individual or institutional provider is paid a fixed, per capita amount without regard to the actual number or nature of services provided to each patient.
A scheme which provides reimbursement for the health services rendered, generally by an institution, and which provides added financial rewards if certain conditions are met. Such a scheme is intended to promote and reward increased efficiency and cost containment, with better care, or at least without adverse effect on the quality of the care rendered.
Any system which allows payors to share some of the financial risk associated with a particular patient population with providers. Providers agree to adhere to fixed fee schedules in exchange for an increase in their payor base and a chance to benefit from cost containment measures. Common risk-sharing methods are prospective payment schedules (PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM), capitation (CAPITATION FEES), diagnosis-related fees (DIAGNOSIS-RELATED GROUPS), and pre-negotiated fees.
The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
Method of charging whereby a physician or other practitioner bills for each encounter or service rendered. In addition to physicians, other health care professionals are reimbursed via this mechanism. Fee-for-service plans contrast with salary, per capita, and prepayment systems, where the payment does not change with the number of services actually used or if none are used. (From Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.
Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.
A partnership, corporation, association, or other legal entity that enters into an arrangement for the provision of services with persons who are licensed to practice medicine, osteopathy, and dentistry, and with other care personnel. Under an IPA arrangement, licensed professional persons provide services through the entity in accordance with a mutually accepted compensation arrangement, while retaining their private practices. Services under the IPA are marketed through a prepaid health plan. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)
Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.
Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.
The practice of assisting women in childbirth.
Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.
Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.
The interactions between physician and patient.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.
The number of beds which a hospital has been designed and constructed to contain. It may also refer to the number of beds set up and staffed for use.
Government-controlled hospitals which represent the major health facility for a designated geographic area.
The different methods of scheduling patient visits, appointment systems, individual or group appointments, waiting times, waiting lists for hospitals, walk-in clinics, etc.
Hospitals which provide care for a single category of illness with facilities and staff directed toward a specific service.
Women licensed to practice medicine.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
A class of hospitals that includes profit or not-for-profit hospitals that are controlled by a legal entity other than a government agency. (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed)
Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.
A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.
The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.
A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.
The obtaining and management of funds for hospital needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.
Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.
The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.
A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.
The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.
Areawide planning for hospitals or planning of a particular hospital unit on the basis of projected consumer need. This does not include hospital design and construction or architectural plans.
Major administrative divisions of the hospital.
The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.
Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.
Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.
The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)
Those areas of the hospital organization not considered departments which provide specialized patient care. They include various hospital special care wards.
Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.
Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.
Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.
Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.
Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.
Information centers primarily serving the needs of hospital medical staff and sometimes also providing patient education and other services.
The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.
The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.
A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.
Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Hospitals controlled by the county government.
Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.
The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of services provided for obstetric and gynecologic patients.
Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.
Integrated, computer-assisted systems designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information concerned with the administrative and clinical aspects of providing medical services within the hospital.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
Hospital department that manages and supervises the dietary program in accordance with the patients' requirements.
Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.
A professional society in the United States whose membership is composed of hospitals.
Hospitals controlled by the city government.
Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).
Private hospitals that are owned or sponsored by religious organizations.
Business management of medical, dental and veterinary practices that may include capital financing, utilization management, and arrangement of capitation agreements with other parties.
An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
Special hospitals which provide care to women during pregnancy and parturition.
Hospital facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.
Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.
Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.