Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.
The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of members of minority groups.
An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.
A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
The difference between two images on the retina when looking at a visual stimulus. This occurs since the two retinas do not have the same view of the stimulus because of the location of our eyes. Thus the left eye does not get exactly the same view as the right eye.
Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.
Perception of three-dimensionality.
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.
The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.
Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.
The turning inward of the lines of sight toward each other.
The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.
A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.
The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.
An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE established in 1990 to "provide indexing, abstracting, translating, publishing, and other services leading to a more effective and timely dissemination of information on research, demonstration projects, and evaluations with respect to health care to public and private entities and individuals engaged in the improvement of health care delivery..." It supersedes the National Center for Health Services Research. The United States Agency for Health Care Policy and Research was renamed Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) under the Healthcare Research and Quality Act of 1999.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
Cultural and linguistic competence is a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. Competence implies the capacity to function effectively as an individual and an organization within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by consumers and their communities.
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Identifies, for study and analysis, important issues and problems that relate to health and medicine. The Institute initiates and conducts studies of national policy and planning for health care and health-related education and research; it also responds to requests from the federal government and other agencies for studies and advice.
Professional society representing the field of medicine.
Individuals licensed to practice medicine.
An oath, attributed to Hippocrates, that serves as an ethical guide for the medical profession.
Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.
Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.
Occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians, and are qualified by special training and, frequently, by licensure to work in supporting roles in the health care field. These occupations include, but are not limited to, medical technology, physical therapy, physician assistant, etc.
The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.