Happiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Anger: A strong emotional feeling of displeasure aroused by being interfered with, injured or threatened.Pleasure: Sensation of enjoyment or gratification.Charities: Social welfare organizations with programs designed to assist individuals in need.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Biological Psychiatry: An interdisciplinary science concerned with studies of the biological bases of behavior - biochemical, genetic, physiological, and neurological - and applying these to the understanding and treatment of mental illness.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Neuroanatomy: Study of the anatomy of the nervous system as a specialty or discipline.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Expressed Emotion: Frequency and quality of negative emotions, e.g., anger or hostility, expressed by family members or significant others, that often lead to a high relapse rate, especially in schizophrenic patients. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Existentialism: Philosophy based on the analysis of the individual's existence in the world which holds that human existence cannot be completely described in scientific terms. Existentialism also stresses the freedom and responsibility of the individual as well as the uniqueness of religious and ethical experiences and the analysis of subjective phenomena such as anxiety, guilt, and suffering. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Social Networking: Individuals connecting by family, work or other interests. It also includes connectivity facilitated by computer-based communications.Marriage: The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.