The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.
A historical and cultural entity dispersed across a wide geographical area under the influence of Greek civilization, culture, and science. The Greek Empire extended from the Greek mainland and the Aegean islands from the 16th century B.C., to the Indus Valley in the 4th century under Alexander the Great, and to southern Italy and Sicily. Greek medicine began with Homeric and Aesculapian medicine and continued unbroken to Hippocrates (480-355 B.C.). The classic period of Greek medicine was 460-136 B.C. and the Graeco-Roman period, 156 B.C.-576 A.D. (From A. Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed; from F. H. Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed)
Aspects of health and disease related to travel.
The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.
Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A sultanate comprised at various times of parts of EUROPE, ASIA, and AFRICA. Its period extends generally from 1301 to 1922.
An ancient city, the site of modern Istanbul. From the 4th to 15th centuries the empire extended from southeastern Europe to western Asia, reaching its greatest extent under Justinian (527-565). By about 1000 A.D. it comprised the southern Balkans, Greece, Asia Minor, and parts of southern Italy. The capture of Constantinople in 1453 marked the formal end of the Byzantine Empire. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988)
Usually refers to planned scientific data-gathering excursions.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.
Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.
Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
An area of water mostly surrounded by land, usually smaller than a gulf, and affording access to the sea.
The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.
Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)
The process by which a person or group of persons comes to be regarded or treated as lacking in human qualities.
A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.
Character traits that are considered to be morally praiseworthy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)
The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.
A belief or practice which lacks adequate basis for proof; an embodiment of fear of the unknown, magic, and ignorance.
Use for articles on the investing of funds for income or profit.
Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.
Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.
Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.
Institutional funding for facilities and for equipment which becomes a part of the assets of the institution.