A form of rapid-onset LIVER FAILURE, also known as fulminant hepatic failure, caused by severe liver injury or massive loss of HEPATOCYTES. It is characterized by sudden development of liver dysfunction and JAUNDICE. Acute liver failure may progress to exhibit cerebral dysfunction even HEPATIC COMA depending on the etiology that includes hepatic ISCHEMIA, drug toxicity, malignant infiltration, and viral hepatitis such as post-transfusion HEPATITIS B and HEPATITIS C.
Analgesic antipyretic derivative of acetanilide. It has weak anti-inflammatory properties and is used as a common analgesic, but may cause liver, blood cell, and kidney damage.
The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.
Organized services to provide immediate psychiatric care to patients with acute psychological disturbances.
A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.
A measure of inpatient health facility use based upon the average number or proportion of beds occupied for a given period of time.
Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.
Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.
A shaker subfamily that is prominently expressed in NEURONS and are necessary for high-frequency, repetitive firing of ACTION POTENTIALS.
A republic in the north of South America, east of VENEZUELA and west of SURINAME. Its capital is Georgetown.
Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.
The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
The medical specialty which deals with WOUNDS and INJURIES as well as resulting disability and disorders from physical traumas.
The MUSCLES, bones (BONE AND BONES), and CARTILAGE of the body.
A province of western Canada, lying between the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Its capital is Edmonton. It was named in honor of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p26 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p12)
Preventive emergency measures and programs designed to protect the individual or community in times of hostile attack.
Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.
Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.
Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
Gases, fumes, vapors, and odors escaping from the cylinders of a gasoline or diesel internal-combustion engine. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.
Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.
The name given to all Christian denominations, sects, or groups rising out of the Reformation. Protestant churches generally agree that the principle of authority should be the Scriptures rather than the institutional church or the pope. (from W.L. Reese, Dictionary of Philosophy and Religion, 1999)
The hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the cardiac patient.
Private hospitals that are owned or sponsored by religious organizations.
Institutions with permanent facilities and organized medical staff which provide the full range of hospital services primarily to a neighborhood area.
Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.