The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.
Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.
The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.
Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)
The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.
Mechanical devices inserted in the inferior vena cava that prevent the migration of blood clots from deep venous thrombosis of the leg.
The main trunk of the systemic arteries.
An independent administrative agency concerned with maintaining competitive free enterprise by prohibiting unfair methods of competition and unfair deceptive acts or practices.
Those federal and state laws, and their enforcement, that protect trade and commerce from unlawful restraints and monopolies or unfair business practices.
Viscous materials composed of complex, high-molecular-weight compounds derived from the distillation of petroleum or the destructive distillation of wood or coal. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A country in northern Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Libya and the Gaza Strip, and the Red Sea north of Sudan, and includes the Asian Sinai Peninsula Its capital is Cairo.
Bodies preserved either by the ancient Egyptian technique or due to chance under favorable climatic conditions.
A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)
The period of history before 500 of the common era.
The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.
Process of preserving a dead body to protect it from decay.
General term for CYSTS and cystic diseases of the OVARY.
A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)
Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.
Human females as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.
The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.
A body of stories, the origins of which may be unknown or forgotten, that serve to explain practices, beliefs, institutions or natural phenomena. Mythology includes legends and folk tales. It may refer to classical mythology or to a body of modern thought and modern life. (From Webster's 1st ed)
Misunderstanding among individuals, frequently research subjects, of scientific methods such as randomization and placebo controls.
A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.
The individual's objective evaluation of the external world and the ability to differentiate adequately between it and the internal world; considered to be a primary ego function.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.
The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.
Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.
Modulation of human voice to produce sounds augmented by musical tonality and rhythm.
The use of music as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of neurological, mental, or behavioral disorders.
An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.
All the organs involved in reproduction and the formation and release of URINE. It includes the kidneys, ureters, BLADDER; URETHRA, and the organs of reproduction - ovaries, UTERUS; FALLOPIAN TUBES; VAGINA; and CLITORIS in women and the testes; SEMINAL VESICLES; PROSTATE; seminal ducts; and PENIS in men.
Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.
Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.
Selection of a type of occupation or profession.
Those customs and ceremonies pertaining to the dead.
The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.
Eating other individuals of one's own species.
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.