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Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Students, Nursing: Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate: A four-year program in nursing education in a college or university leading to a B.S.N. (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). Graduates are eligible for state examination for licensure as RN (Registered Nurse).Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Education, Premedical: Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to medical school.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Education, Distance: Education via communication media (correspondence, radio, television, computer networks) with little or no in-person face-to-face contact between students and teachers. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1997)Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Competency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Educational Technology: Systematic identification, development, organization, or utilization of educational resources and the management of these processes. It is occasionally used also in a more limited sense to describe the use of equipment-oriented techniques or audiovisual aids in educational settings. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, December 1993, p132)Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.College Admission Test: Test designed to identify students suitable for admission into a graduate or undergraduate curriculum.Genetics: The branch of science concerned with the means and consequences of transmission and generation of the components of biological inheritance. (Stedman, 26th ed)Sex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.United StatesFaculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Schools, Nursing: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of nursing.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Interdisciplinary Studies: Programs of study which span the traditional boundaries of academic scholarship.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Physics: The study of those aspects of energy and matter in terms of elementary principles and laws. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.HumanitiesEducation, Nursing, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform nurses of recent advances in their fields.Natural Science Disciplines: The sciences dealing with processes observable in nature.Community Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the total health of the individual within the home environment and in the community, and with the application of comprehensive care to the prevention and treatment of illness in the entire community.Pharmacology, Clinical: The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Education, Nursing, Graduate: Those educational activities engaged in by holders of a bachelor's degree in nursing, which are primarily designed to prepare them for entrance into a specific field of nursing, and may lead to board certification or a more advanced degree.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Zoology: The study of animals - their morphology, growth, distribution, classification, and behavior.Great BritainLaboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Licensure, Medical: The granting of a license to practice medicine.Developmental Biology: The field of biology which deals with the process of the growth and differentiation of an organism.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Psychology, Educational: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological aspects of teaching and the formal learning process in school.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Education, Pharmacy, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform graduate pharmacists of recent advances in their particular field.Nursing Education Research: Investigations into the problems of integrating research findings into nursing curricula, developing problem solving skills, finding approaches to clinical teaching, determining the level of practice by graduates from different basic preparations, etc.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Professional Misconduct: Violation of laws, regulations, or professional standards.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Pediatric Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with the dental problems of children, proper maintenance, and treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Education, Pharmacy, Graduate: Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Orthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the prevention and correction of dental and oral anomalies (malocclusion).Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.Endodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the maintenance of the dental pulp in a state of health and the treatment of the pulp cavity (pulp chamber and pulp canal).Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Microbiology: The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.