General name for two extinct orders of reptiles from the Mesozoic era: Saurischia and Ornithischia.
Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.
The study of early forms of life through fossil remains.
Large, long-tailed reptiles, including caimans, of the order Loricata.
Cold-blooded, air-breathing VERTEBRATES belonging to the class Reptilia, usually covered with external scales or bony plates.
The rigid framework of connected bones that gives form to the body, protects and supports its soft organs and tissues, and provides attachments for MUSCLES.
The comparative study of animal structure with regard to homologous organs or parts. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The ceasing of existence of a species or taxonomic groups of organisms.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
Events and activities of the Earth and its structures.
The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.
The physical measurements of a body.
Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.
An order of flightless birds comprising the ostriches, which naturally inhabit open, low rainfall areas of Africa.
The consumption of animal flesh.
A hard or leathery calciferous exterior covering of an egg.
Flat keratinous structures found on the skin surface of birds. Feathers are made partly of a hollow shaft fringed with barbs. They constitute the plumage.
One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.
The inanimate matter of Earth, the structures and properties of this matter, and the processes that affect it.
The science of the earth and other celestial bodies and their history as recorded in the rocks. It includes the study of geologic processes of an area such as rock formations, weathering and erosion, and sedimentation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.
The study of the teeth of early forms of life through fossil remains.
Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Thick triangular muscle in the SHOULDER whose function is to abduct, flex, and extend the arm. It is a common site of INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTIONS.
Sudden slips on a fault, and the resulting ground shaking and radiated seismic energy caused by the slips, or by volcanic or magmatic activity, or other sudden stress changes in the earth. Faults are fractures along which the blocks of EARTH crust on either side have moved relative to one another parallel to the fracture.
The ash, dust, gases, and lava released by volcanic explosion. The gases are volatile matter composed principally of about 90% water vapor, and carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen. The ash or dust is pyroclastic ejecta and lava is molten extrusive material consisting mainly of magnesium silicate. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Critical analyses of books or other monographic works.
Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.
Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.
A group of Indian Ocean Islands, east of Tanzania. Their capital is Victoria. They were first claimed by the French in 1744 but taken by the English in 1794 and made a dependency of MAURITIUS in 1810. They became a crown colony in 1903 and a republic within the Commonwealth in 1976. They were named for the French finance minister, Jean Moreau de Sechelles, but respelled by the English in 1794. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1102 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p496)
The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.
Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.
The bones of the upper and lower ARM. They include the CLAVICLE and SCAPULA.
A defense mechanism operating unconsciously, in which the individual attempts to justify or make consciously tolerable, by plausible means, feelings, behavior, and motives that would otherwise be intolerable.