Loading...
Composite Tissue Allografts: A graft consisting of multiple tissues, such as muscle, bone, nerve, vasculature, and skin, comprising a functional unit for reconstructive purposes.Hand Transplantation: The transference of a complete HAND, as a composite of many tissue types, from one individual to another.Facial Transplantation: The transference between individuals of the entire face or major facial structures. In addition to the skin and cartilaginous tissue (CARTILAGE), it may include muscle and bone as well.Tissue Transplantation: Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Transplantation Tolerance: An induced state of non-reactivity to grafted tissue from a donor organism that would ordinarily trigger a cell-mediated or humoral immune response.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Rats, Inbred WFVascularized Composite Allotransplantation: Transference of multiple tissues, such as muscle, bone, nerve, and skin, as a functional unit for reconstructive purposes. Blood supply to the transplanted tissues is maintained throughout the transplantation procedure with minimal ischemia. Maintenance of vascularity in the graft promotes its viability, function, and survival in the recipient.Skin Transplantation: The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.Rectus Abdominis: A long flat muscle that extends along the whole length of both sides of the abdomen. It flexes the vertebral column, particularly the lumbar portion; it also tenses the anterior abdominal wall and assists in compressing the abdominal contents. It is frequently the site of hematomas. In reconstructive surgery it is often used for the creation of myocutaneous flaps. (From Gray's Anatomy, 30th American ed, p491)Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.