Financial assistance provided by the government to indigent families with dependent children who meet certain requirements as defined by the Social Security Act, Title IV, in the U.S.
Financial assistance to impoverished persons for the essentials of living through federal, state or local government programs.
Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).
Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.
Hospitals which provide care for the military personnel and usually for their dependents.
The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.
Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.
Schedule giving optimum times usually for primary and/or secondary immunization.
The first MENSTRUAL CYCLE marked by the initiation of MENSTRUATION.
A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
The granting of a license to practice pharmacy.
A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.
Organizations which are not operated for a profit and may be supported by endowments or private contributions.
Private, not-for-profit hospitals that are autonomous, self-established, and self-supported.
Hospitals owned and operated by a corporation or an individual that operate on a for-profit basis, also referred to as investor-owned hospitals.
Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).
A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
Discarded animal and vegetable matter from a kitchen or the refuse from food preparation. (From Random House College Dictionary, 1982)
The branch of psychology concerned with psychological methods of recognizing and treating behavior disorders.
Those customs and ceremonies pertaining to the dead.
Process of preserving a dead body to protect it from decay.
Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.
A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to domestic national security.
Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)
Voluntary acceptance of a child of other parents to be as one's own child, usually with legal confirmation.
Families who care for neglected children or patients unable to care for themselves.
Promotion and protection of the rights of children; frequently through a legal process.
The formally authorized guardianship or care of a CHILD.
Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.