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(1/4947) Leukemia translocation protein PLZF inhibits cell growth and expression of cyclin A.

The PLZF gene was identified by its fusion with the RARalpha locus in a therapy resistant form of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) associated with the t(11;17)(q23;q21) translocation. Here we describe PLZF as a negative regulator of cell cycle progression ultimately leading to growth suppression. PLZF can bind and repress the cyclin A2 promoter while expression of cyclin A2 reverts the growth suppressed phenotype of myeloid cells expressing PLZF. In contrast RARalpha-PLZF, a fusion protein generated in t(11;17)(q23;q21)-APL activates cyclin A2 transcription and allows expression of cyclin A in anchorage-deprived NIH3T3 cells. Therefore, cyclin A2 is a candidate target gene for PLZF and inhibition of cyclin A expression may contribute to the growth suppressive properties of PLZF. Deregulation of cyclin A2 by RARalpha-PLZF may represent an oncogenic mechanism of this chimeric protein and contribute to the aggressive clinical phenotype of t(11;17)(q23;q21)-associated APL.  (+info)

(2/4947) Three distinct domains in TEL-AML1 are required for transcriptional repression of the IL-3 promoter.

A cytogenetically cryptic (12;21) translocation is the most common molecular abnormality identified in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and it generates a chimeric TEL-AML1 protein. Fusion of the Helix-Loop-Helix (HLH) (also called the pointed) domain of TEL to AML1 has been suggested to convert AML1 from a transcriptional activator to a repressor. To define the structural features of this chimeric protein required for repression, we analysed the transcriptional activity of a series of TEL-AML1 mutants on the AML1-responsive interleukin-3 (IL-3) promoter, a potentially relevant gene target. Our results demonstrate that TEL-AML1 represses basal IL-3 promoter activity in lymphoid cells, and deletion mutant analysis identified three distinct domains of TEL-AML1 that are required for repression; the HLH (pointed) motif contained in the TEL portion of TEL-AML1, and both the runt homology domain (Rhd) and the 74 amino acids downstream of the Rhd that are present in the AML1 portion of the fusion protein. Although AML1B (and a shorter AML1 isoform, AML1A) have transcriptional activating activity on the IL-3 promoter, fusion of the AML1 gene to the TEL gene generates a repressor of IL-3 expression. Consistent with this activity, freshly isolated human ALL cells that contain TEL-AML1 do not express IL-3.  (+info)

(3/4947) Retinoic acid, but not arsenic trioxide, degrades the PLZF/RARalpha fusion protein, without inducing terminal differentiation or apoptosis, in a RA-therapy resistant t(11;17)(q23;q21) APL patient.

Primary blasts of a t(11;17)(q23;q21) acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) patient were analysed with respect to retinoic acid (RA) and arsenic trioxide (As2O3) sensitivity as well as PLZF/RARalpha status. Although RA induced partial monocytic differentiation ex vivo, but not in vivo, As203 failed to induce apoptosis in culture, contrasting with t(15;17) APL and arguing against the clinical use of As203 in t(11;17)(q23;q21) APL. Prior to cell culture, PLZF/RARalpha was found to exactly co-localize with PML onto PML nuclear bodies. However upon cell culture, it quickly shifted towards microspeckles, its localization found in transfection experiments. Arsenic trioxide, known to induce aggregation of PML nuclear bodies, left the microspeckled PLZF/RARalpha localization completely unaffected. RA treatment led to PLZF/RARalpha degradation. However, this complete PLZF/RARalpha degradation was not accompanied by differentiation or apoptosis, which could suggest a contribution of the reciprocal RARalpha/PLZF fusion product in leukaemogenesis or the existence of irreversible changes induced by the chimera.  (+info)

(4/4947) Insertion of excised IgH switch sequences causes overexpression of cyclin D1 in a myeloma tumor cell.

Oncogenes are often dysregulated in B cell tumors as a result of a reciprocal translocation involving an immunoglobulin locus. The translocations are caused by errors in two developmentally regulated DNA recombination processes: V(D)J and IgH switch recombination. Both processes share the property of joining discontinuous sequences from one chromosome and releasing intervening sequences as circles that are lost from progeny cells. Here we show that these intervening sequences may instead insert in the genome and that during productive IgH mu-epsilon switch recombination in U266 myeloma tumor cells, a portion of the excised IgH switch intervening sequences containing the 3' alpha-1 enhancer has inserted on chromosome 11q13, resulting in overexpression of the adjacent cyclin D1 oncogene.  (+info)

(5/4947) TEL/PDGFbetaR induces hematologic malignancies in mice that respond to a specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

The TEL/PDGFbetaR fusion protein is expressed as the consequence of a recurring t(5;12) translocation associated with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Unlike other activated protein tyrosine kinases associated with hematopoietic malignancies, TEL/PDGFbetaR is invariably associated with a myeloid leukemia phenotype in humans. To test the transforming properties of TEL/PDGFbetaR in vivo, and to analyze the basis for myeloid lineage specificity in humans, we constructed transgenic mice with TEL/PDGFbetaR expression driven by a lymphoid-specific immunoglobulin enhancer-promoter cassette. These mice developed lymphoblastic lymphomas of both T and B lineage, demonstrating that TEL/PDGFbetaR is a transforming protein in vivo, and that the transforming ability of this fusion is not inherently restricted to the myeloid lineage. Treatment of TEL/PDGFbetaR transgenic animals with a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor with in vitro activity against PDGFbetaR (CGP57148) resulted in suppression of disease and a prolongation of survival. A therapeutic benefit was apparent both in animals treated before the development of overt clonal disease and in animals transplanted with clonal tumor cells. These results suggest that small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be effective treatment for activated tyrosine kinase-mediated malignancies both early in the course of disease and after the development of additional transforming mutations.  (+info)

(6/4947) Structure and inheritance of some heterozygous Robertsonian translocation in man.

Banding studies in 25 Robertsonian translocations showed that all could be interpreted as stable dicentrics. The mechanism for their stability is likely to be the proximity of their centromeres but centromeric suppression could also have a role. In many of these dicentric translocations, discontinuous centromeric suppression, as indicated by chromatid separation at one of the centromeric regions, was observed in C-banded preparations. A further observation of undefined relation to the first was that the ratio of the two constitutive centromeric heterochromatin (CCH) regions from the component chromosomes of the translocations was variable in the same translocation type, e.g. t(13;14). It is proposed that this ratio may influence the segregation ratio. Abnormal spermatogenesis is suggested as the likely mechanism for the difference in the proportion of aneuploid offspring in the progeny of maternal and paternal heterozygotes. Neither of the t dic(21;21)s could be interpreted as isochromosomes. It is proposed that Robertsonian fusion translocations be defined as stable, dicentric, whole-arm translocations, with both centromeres in a median position and resulting in the loss of a small acentric fragment during this formation. It is suggested that they occur at high frequency between telocentric or, as in man, certain acrocentric chromosomes because of some intrinsic property of those chromosomes not possessed by metacentric chromosomes and mediated by interphase association of centromeres.  (+info)

(7/4947) Der(22) syndrome and velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome share a 1.5-Mb region of overlap on chromosome 22q11.

Derivative 22 (der[22]) syndrome is a rare disorder associated with multiple congenital anomalies, including profound mental retardation, preauricular skin tags or pits, and conotruncal heart defects. It can occur in offspring of carriers of the constitutional t(11;22)(q23;q11) translocation, owing to a 3:1 meiotic malsegregation event resulting in partial trisomy of chromosomes 11 and 22. The trisomic region on chromosome 22 overlaps the region hemizygously deleted in another congenital anomaly disorder, velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS). Most patients with VCFS/DGS have a similar 3-Mb deletion, whereas some have a nested distal deletion endpoint resulting in a 1.5-Mb deletion, and a few rare patients have unique deletions. To define the interval on 22q11 containing the t(11;22) breakpoint, haplotype analysis and FISH mapping were performed for five patients with der(22) syndrome. Analysis of all the patients was consistent with 3:1 meiotic malsegregation in the t(11;22) carrier parent. FISH-mapping studies showed that the t(11;22) breakpoint occurred in the same interval as the 1.5-Mb distal deletion breakpoint for VCFS. The deletion breakpoint of one VCFS patient with an unbalanced t(18;22) translocation also occurred in the same region. Hamster-human somatic hybrid cell lines from a patient with der(22) syndrome and a patient with VCFS showed that the breakpoints occurred in an interval containing low-copy repeats, distal to RANBP1 and proximal to ZNF74. The presence of low-copy repetitive sequences may confer susceptibility to chromosome rearrangements. A 1.5-Mb region of overlap on 22q11 in both syndromes suggests the presence of dosage-dependent genes in this interval.  (+info)

(8/4947) Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes: therapeutic implications.

Genetic instability is a hallmark of cancer. Alterations in DNA through mutations, deletions, and translocations affect genes that are fundamental to normal cell growth differentiation and programmed cell death. Here, we discuss these alterations as they relate to oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. In addition, we describe the implications the changes in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have on designing new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer.  (+info)