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(1/52) Diagnosis and treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity.

This bibliographic review provides a general view of the etiology, characteristics and treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity, so that professionals can use this information in the therapeutic management of this clinical condition. For this purpose, the authors have analyzed whole texts of relevant articles on the subject. This study showed that the predisposing factors associated with the causes of dentinal hypersensitivity must be controlled or eliminated, by educating the patient regarding the excessive intake of acidic food, as well as providing guidance on the proper tooth brushing technique and analysis of occlusion. Effective treatment must be preceded by a proper diagnosis, established after the exclusion of any other possible causes of the pain. These cases must be managed efficiently, quickly and permanently. The availability of a wide variety of treatment could be an indicator that there is still no effective desensitizing agent to completely resolve the patient's discomfort, or that it is difficult to treat, irrespective of the available treatment options. Even with the large number of published studies, it has not been possible to reach a consensus about the product that represents the gold standard in the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity.  (+info)

(2/52) Glass ionomer cements and their role in the restoration of non-carious cervical lesions.

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(3/52) Genetic integration of molar cusp size variation in baboons.

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(4/52) Reasons for placement of restorations on previously unrestored tooth surfaces by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

OBJECTIVE: The authors conducted a study to identify and quantify the reasons used by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) for placing restorations on unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and the dental materials they used in doing so. METHODS: A total of 229 DPBRN practitioner-investigators provided data from their practices regarding 9,890 consecutive restorations in 5,810 patients. Information the practitioner-investigators provided included their reasons for restoring the teeth, the specific teeth and surfaces they restored and the restorative materials they used. RESULTS: Primary caries (85 percent of teeth, 8,351 of 9,890) and noncarious defects (15 percent, 1,479 of 9,890) were the main reasons participants gave for placing restorations. Participants placed restorations necessitated by caries most frequently on occlusal surfaces (49 percent, 4,091 of 8,351). They used amalgam for 47 percent of the molar restorations and 45 percent of the premolar restorations. They used directly placed resin-based composite (RBC) for 48 percent of the molar restorations, 50 percent of the premolar restorations and 93 percent of the anterior restorations. CONCLUSION: DPBRN practitioner-investigators cited dental caries on occlusal and proximal surfaces of molar teeth as the main reasons for placing restorations on previously unrestored tooth surfaces. RBC was the material they used most commonly for occlusal and anterior restorations. Amalgam remains the material of choice to restore posterior teeth with proximal caries, although the authors noted significant differences in the use of amalgam and RBC by dentists in various regions of the DPBRN.  (+info)

(5/52) Tooth wear: prevalence and associated factors in general practice patients.

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(6/52) Tooth use and wear in three iron-biomineralizing mollusc species.

Chitons and limpets harden their teeth with biominerals in order to scrape algae from hard rock surfaces. To elucidate relationships between tooth structure and function, light and electron microscopy were used to examine naturally worn teeth in three species of mollusc with iron-mineralized teeth and to analyze the grazing marks left by members of these species feeding on wax. For the two chiton species, teeth wore down progressively from the medial to the lateral edge of the cusp, while for the limpet, wear was more evenly distributed across the edges of each cusp. In chitons, this pattern of wear matched the medially biased morphology of the cusps in their protracted position and relates to what is known about the mineral composition and substructure of the teeth. The patterns of progressive tooth wear for each of these species, together with the distinct grazing marks left by each species on the wax substrate, indicate that the teeth are designed to remain functionally effective for as long as possible, and have proved to be a valuable means of rationalizing the internal architecture of the teeth at a range of spatial scales. This information is critical for ongoing studies aimed at understanding the interactions between the organic matrix and mineral components of these teeth.  (+info)

(7/52) Hunter-Schreger Band patterns in human tooth enamel.

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(8/52) Age and individual foraging behavior predict tooth wear in Amboseli baboons.

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