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(1/1709) Effects of soybean oil emulsion and eicosapentaenoic acid on stress response and immune function after a severely stressful operation.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of soybean oil emulsion and oral or enteral administration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on stress response, cytokine production, protein metabolism, and immune function after surgery for esophageal cancer. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: It has been reported that safflower oil, rich in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA), affects the survival rate of septic animals and decreases the immune function. It has also been reported that the administration of fish oil, in contrast, reduces these stress responses and stress-induced immunosuppression. In humans, the effects of soybean oil emulsion and the administration of EPA on stress response and immune function after surgery have not been established. METHODS: Patients who underwent esophagectomy with thoracotomy were divided into three groups. Seven patients were fed by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with soybean oil emulsion, which accounted for 20% of total calories. Seven patients were given oral or enteral administration of 1.8 g/day EPA, in addition to TPN with soybean oil emulsion. Nine patients served as the control group; these patients received fat-free TPN. Serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein, concanavalin A (con A)- or phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, natural killer cell activity, and stress hormones were measured. RESULTS: The postoperative level of serum IL-6 was significantly higher in the group receiving soybean oil emulsion than in the fat-free group. Oral or enteral supplementation of EPA with soybean oil emulsion significantly reduced the level of serum IL-6 compared with the patients receiving soybean oil emulsion. Con A- or PHA-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation decreased significantly on postoperative day 7 in all groups of patients. The supplementation of EPA with soybean oil emulsion significantly improved the lymphocyte proliferation and natural killer cell activity on postoperative day 21 compared with the group receiving soybean oil emulsion. CONCLUSIONS: Soybean oil emulsion amplifies, and the supplementation of EPA reduces, the stress response and stress-induced immunosuppression.  (+info)

(2/1709) Evidence of improving survival of patients with rectal cancer in france: a population based study.

BACKGROUND: Over the past 20 years there have been many changes in the management of rectal cancer. Their impact on the overall population is not well known. AIMS: To determine trends in management and prognosis of rectal cancer in two French regions. SUBJECTS: 1978 patients with a rectal carcinoma diagnosed between 1978 and 1993. METHODS: Time trends in treatment, stage at diagnosis, operative mortality, and survival were studied on a four year basis. A non-conditional logistic regression was performed to obtain an odds ratio for each period adjusted for the other variables. To estimate the independent effect of the period a multivariate relative survival analysis was performed. RESULTS: Over the 16 year period resection rates increased from 66.0% to 80.1%; the increase was particularly noticeable for sphincter saving procedures (+30.6% per four years, p=0.03). The percentage of patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy increased from 24.0% to 40.0% (p=0.02). The proportion of patients with Dukes' type A cancer increased from 17. 7% to 30.6% with a corresponding decrease in those with more advanced disease. Operative mortality decreased by 31.1% per four years (p=0.03). All these improvements have resulted in a dramatic increase in relative survival (from 35.4% for the 1978-1981 period to 57.0% for the 1985-1989 period). CONCLUSIONS: Substantial advances in the management of rectal cancer have been achieved, but there is evidence that further improvements can be made in order to increase survival.  (+info)

(3/1709) Double gallbladder originating from left hepatic duct: a case report and review of literature.

BACKGROUND: Double gallbladder is a rare anomaly of the biliary tract. Double gallbladder arising from the left hepatic duct was previously reported only once in the literature. CASE REPORT: A case of symptomatic cholelithiasis in a double gallbladder, diagnosed on preoperative ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram (ERCP) is reported. At laparoscopic cholangiography via the accessory gallbladder no accessory cystic duct was visualized. After conversion to open cholecystectomy, the duplicated gallbladder was found to arise directly from the left hepatic duct; it was resected and the duct repaired. CONCLUSIONS: We emphasize that a careful intraoperative cholangiographic evaluation of the accessory gallbladder is mandatory in order to prevent inadvertent injury to bile ducts, since a large variety of ductal abnormality may exist.  (+info)

(4/1709) Surgical options in the management of groin hernias.

Inguinal and femoral hernias are the most common conditions for which primary care physicians refer patients for surgical management. Hernias usually present as swelling accompanied by pain or a dragging sensation in the groin. Most hernias can be diagnosed based on the history and clinical examination, but ultrasonography may be useful in differentiating a hernia from other causes of groin swelling. Surgical repair is usually advised because of the danger of incarceration and strangulation, particularly with femoral hernias. Three major types of open repair are currently used, and laparoscopic techniques are also employed. The choice of technique depends on several factors, including the type of hernia, anesthetic considerations, cost, period of postoperative disability and the surgeon's expertise. Following initial herniorrhaphy, complication and recurrence rates are generally low. Laparoscopic techniques make it possible for patients to return to normal activities more quickly, but they are more costly than open procedures. In addition, they require general anesthesia, and the long-term hernia recurrence rate with these procedures is unknown.  (+info)

(5/1709) Comparison of Payne and Scott operations for morbid obesity.

One hundred five patients were operated upon for morbid obesity using accepted criteria for operation. Forty-five patients with the Payne operation (35 cm of jejunum anastomosed end-to-side to 10 cm of ileum) were compared with 45 patients having the Scott operation (30 cm of jejunum anatomosed end-to-end to 15 cm of ileum with the proximal cut end of ileum vented into the transverse colon). The weight loss in the first two years was similar, although the Scott procedure patients lost slightly more weight. Comparison of the two groups by a new grading system also showed little difference in the two procedures. The Scott procedure takes longer and subjects the patient to an additional anastomosis. Study of a smaller group of patients having the Scott operation with varying lengths of jejunum and ileum indicates that there should not be less than 30 cm of jejunum nor more than 15 cm of ileum left in continuity. The length of jejunum is particularly important in the production of weight loss, and accurate intraoperative measurement of intestinal length is crucial. In the postoperative period the length of functional jejunum and ileum can be determined by upper gastrointestinal barium roentgenograms.  (+info)

(6/1709) Patients' experience of surgical accidents.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychological impact of surgical accidents and assess the adequacy of explanations given to the patients involved. DESIGN: Postal questionnaire survey. SETTING: Subjects were selected from files held Action for Victims of Medical Accidents. PATIENTS: 154 surgical patients who had been injured by their treatment, who considered that their treatment had fallen below acceptable standards. MAIN MEASURES: Adequacy of explanations given to patients and responses to standard questionnaires assessing pain, distress, psychiatric morbidity, and psychosocial adjustment (general health questionnaire, impact of events scale, McGill pain questionnaire, and psychosocial adjustment to illness scale). RESULTS: 101 patients completed the questionnaires (69 women, 32 men; mean age 44 (median 41.5) years. Mean scores on the questionnaires indicated that these injured patients were more distressed than people who had suffered serious accidents or bereavements; their levels of pain were comparable, over a year after surgery, to untreated postoperative pain; and their psychosocial adjustment was considerably worse than in patients with serious illnesses. They were extremely unsatisfied with the explanations given about their accident, which they perceived as lacking in information, unclear, inaccurate, and given unsympathetically. Poor explanations were associated with higher levels of disturbing memories and poorer adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical accidents have a major adverse psychological impact on patients, and poor communication after the accident may increase patients' distress. IMPLICATIONS: Communication skills in dealing with such patients should be improved to ensure the clear and comprehensive explanations that they need. Many patients will also require psychological treatment to help their recovery.  (+info)

(7/1709) Measuring patient satisfaction: a test of construct validity.

OBJECTIVE: To establish the validity of two patient satisfaction questionnaires (surgery satisfaction questionnaire (SSQ) and consultation satisfaction questionnaire (CSQ)) developed for use in general practice. DESIGN: Prospective study of performance of SSQ and CSQ in patients selected for their predicted levels of satisfaction. SETTING: Avon Family Health Services Authority (FHSA); general practices in Bristol (practice A) and in Cheltenham (practice B). PATIENTS: 400 patients selected by Avon FHSA who had changed practices but not their home address and whose original practice had not changed its services (group 1); 869 randomly selected patients (221 from practice A, 648 from practice B) (group 2). MAIN MEASURES: Median difference in satisfaction scores for each questionnaire between groups 1 and 2 and between subgroups of group 2 patients according to assessed level in continuity of care (< 50%, > or = 50%) in the past 12 consultations. RESULTS: 272 (68.0%) patients in group 1 completed the SSQ and CSQ. 711 (81.2%) patients in group 2 (178/221 (80.5%) in practice A, 533/648(82.3%) in practice B) completed the SSQ and 374(88/106(83.0%), 286/335(85.4%)) completed the CSQ. Both questionnaires classified patients in groups 1 and 2 according to the construct of satisfaction; thus the difference in median scores for every component of satisfaction in each questionnaire was significant and occurred in the direction predicted by the construct. Each questionnaire also discriminated between patients grouped according to their assessed level of continuity of care. CONCLUSION: SSQ and CSQ are valid measures of satisfaction for these types of patients. IMPLICATIONS: Valid measures of patient satisfaction can be developed; untested instruments should no longer be used.  (+info)

(8/1709) An approach to an index of hospital performance.

Two indexes are described, based on measures of administrative effectiveness and patient care effectiveness. The measures used were selected and ranked by a Delphi panel from a list of 30 measures drawn from the literature. Weights were assigned by the panel to 19 selected measures. The resulting indexes did well in a test on data collected from 32 Texas hospitals.  (+info)