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(1/1254) Return of lymphatic function after flap transfer for acute lymphedema.

OBJECTIVE: The goals of this work were to develop animal models of lymphedema and tissue flap transfer, and to observe physiologic changes in lymphatic function that occur in these models over time, both systemically with lymphoscintigraphy (LS) and locally using fluorescence microlymphangiography (FM). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Although lymphedema has been managed by a combination of medical and surgical approaches, no effective long-term cure exists. Surgical attempts aimed at reconnecting impaired lymphatic channels or bypassing obstructed areas have failed. METHODS: The tails of rats (A groups) and mice (B groups) were used because of their different features. Lymphedema was created by ligation of the lymphatics at the tail base and quantified by diameter measurements there. In the experimental group, rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was transferred across the ligation. In addition to the ligation (A1 and B1) and ligation + flap (A2 and B2) groups, three control groups were included: sham flap with ligation (B4), sham flap alone (B5), and normal (A3 and B3) animals. Observations were made at weekly time points for lymphatic function and continuity. RESULTS: Lymphedema was successfully created in the mouse ligation groups (B1 and B4) and sustained for the entire length of observation (up to 14 weeks). Lymphatic continuity was restored in those animals with transferred flaps across the ligation site (A2 and B2), as seen both by LS and FM. Sham flaps did not visibly affect lymphatic function nor did they cause any visible swelling in the tail. CONCLUSIONS: Acute lymphedema developing after ligation of tail lymphatics in mice can be prevented by myocutaneous flap transfer. Restored lymphatic continuity and function were demonstrable using lymphoscintigraphy and fluorescence microlymphangiography.  (+info)

(2/1254) Modified Bankart procedure for recurrent anterior dislocation and subluxation of the shoulder in athletes.

Thirty-four athletes (34 shoulders) with recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability were treated with a modified Bankart procedure, using a T-shaped capsular incision in the anterior capsule. The inferior flap was advanced medially and/or superiorly and rigidly fixed at the point of the Bankart lesion by a small cancellous screw and a spike-washer. The superior flap was advanced inferiority and sutured over the inferior flap. Twenty-five athletes (median age: 22) were evaluated over a mean period of follow-up of 65 months. The clinical results were graded, according to Rowe, as 22 (88%) excellent, 3 (12%) good, and none as fair or poor. The mean postoperative range of movement was 92 degrees of external rotation in 90 degrees of abduction. Elevation and internal rotation was symmetrical with the opposite side. Twenty-four patients returned to active sport, 22 at their previous level. This modified Bankart procedure is an effective treatment for athletes with recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability.  (+info)

(3/1254) Breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

This activity is designed for primary care physicians. GOAL: To appreciate the significant advances and current techniques in breast reconstruction after mastectomy and realize the positive physical and emotional benefits to the patient. OBJECTIVES: 1. Understand basic and anatomic principles of breast reconstruction. 2. Discuss the options for breast reconstruction: a) immediate versus delayed; b) autologous tissue versus implant; and c) stages of reconstruction and ancillary procedures. 3. Provide a comprehensive overview of the risks and benefits of, as well as the alternatives to, each approach so primary care physicians can counsel patients effectively.  (+info)

(4/1254) Soft tissue cover for the exposed knee prosthesis.

This study assess the use of muscle flaps to cover exposed knee prostheses and emphasises the need for early plastic surgery consultation. In five of the six patients studied the wound was successfully covered and the knee prosthesis salvaged with a reasonable functional outcome.  (+info)

(5/1254) Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging after acoustic neuroma surgery: influence of packing materials in the drilled internal auditory canal on assessment of residual tumor.

Serial magnetic resonance (MR) images taken after acoustic neuroma surgery were analyzed to evaluate the pattern and timing of postoperative contrast enhancement in 22 patients who underwent acoustic neuroma removal via the suboccipital transmeatal approach. The opened internal auditory canal (IAC) was covered with a muscle piece in nine patients and with fibrin glue in 13. A total of 56 MR imaging examinations were obtained between days 1 and 930 after surgery. MR imaging showed linear enhancement at the IAC within the first 2 days after surgery, and revealed nodular enhancement on day 3 or later in patients with a muscle piece. MR imaging tended to show linear enhancement at the IAC, irrespective of the timing of the examination in the patients with fibrin glue. Postoperative MR imaging on day 3 or later showed the incidence of nodular enhancement in patients with muscle was significantly higher than in patients with fibrin glue. The results illustrate the difficulty in differentiating nodular enhancement on a muscle piece from tumor by a single postoperative MR imaging study. Therefore, fibrin glue is generally advocated as a packing material of the IAC because it rarely shows masslike enhancement on postoperative MR imaging. When a muscle piece is used in patients at high risk for postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks, MR imaging should be obtained within the first 2 days after surgery, since benign enhancement of muscle will not occur and obscure the precise extent of tumor resection.  (+info)

(6/1254) Mechanical properties of heel pads reconstructed with flaps.

We compared the mechanical properties of normal and reconstructed heel pads in seven patients. Four had latissimus dorsi flaps and one each an anterior thigh flap, a local dorsalis pedis flap and a sural arterial flap. The thickness of the heel pad was measured under serial incremental loads of 0.5 kg to a maximum of 3 kg and then relaxed sequentially. The load-displacement curve of the heel pad during a loading-unloading cycle was plotted and from this the unloaded heel-pad thickness (UHPT), compressibility index (CI), elastic modulus (Ep), and energy dissipation ratio (EDR) were calculated. The EDR was significantly increased in the reconstructed heels (53.7 +/- 18% v 23.4 +/- 6.5%, p = 0.003) indicating that in them more energy is dissipated as heat. Insufficient functional capacity in the reconstructed heel pad can lead to the development of shock-induced discomfort and ulceration.  (+info)

(7/1254) Labial fat pad grafts (modified Martius graft) in complex perianal fistulas.

Complex perianal fistulas may at times be very difficult to treat. New vascularised tissue can reach the perineum from leg muscles and the omentum. A less well-known source is the labial fat tissue (modified Martius graft) which has a robust posterolateral pedicle and which can be useful as an adjunctive technique for high anterior anal and rectovaginal fistulas. Between November 1993 and July 1997, eight women (age range 18-55 years) underwent modified Martius grafting, six of the eight having a rectovaginal fistula and two a high complex (suprasphincteric) perianal fistula. Anorectal advancement flaps were performed in five patients and three had a transperineal approach with simultaneous anterior sphincter repair because of concurrent anal incontinence. All patients had a defunctioning stoma. The fistula healed in six of the eight patients (75%) and recurred in two patients. The stoma has been closed in five of the eight patients (one patient's fistula has healed but her stoma cannot be closed because of anal incontinence). This is a useful technique when confronted with a difficult anterior fistula in women.  (+info)

(8/1254) Three ventriculoplasty techniques applied to three left-ventricular pseudoaneurysms in the same patient.

A 59-year-old male patient underwent surgery for triple-vessel coronary artery disease and left-ventricular aneurysm in 1994. Four months after coronary artery bypass grafting and classical left-ventricular aneurysmectomy (with Teflon felt strips), a left-ventricular pseudoaneurysm developed due to infection, and this was treated surgically with an autologous glutaraldehyde-treated pericardium patch over which an omental pedicle graft was placed. Two months later, under emergent conditions, re-repair was performed with a diaphragmatic pericardial pedicle graft due to pseudoaneurysm reformation and rupture. A 3rd repair was required in a 3rd episode 8 months later. Sternocostal resection enabled implantation of the left pectoralis major muscle into the ventricular defect. Six months after the last surgical intervention, the patient died of cerebral malignancy. Pseudoaneurysm reformation, however, had not been observed. To our knowledge, our case is the 1st reported in the literature in which there have been 3 or more different operative techniques applied to 3 or more distinct episodes of pseudoaneurysm formation secondary to post-aneurysmectomy infection. We propose that pectoral muscle flaps be strongly considered as a material for re-repair of left-ventricular aneurysms.  (+info)