Laboratory surge response to pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, New York City metropolitan area, USA. (1/12)

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Laboratory surge capacity and pandemic influenza. (2/12)

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Southeastern Regional Pediatric Disaster Surge Network: a public health partnership. (3/12)

In the event of a natural or man-made disaster involving large numbers of children, resources in the Southeastern U.S. are extremely limited. This article chronicles the efforts of the Alabama Department of Public Health, the Mississippi State Department of Health, and the South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness in conjunction with more than 40 organizations to develop a voluntary network of health-care providers, public health departments, volunteers, and emergency responders from Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. The purpose of the Southeastern Regional Pediatric Disaster Surge Network (the Network) is to improve the pediatric preparedness response strategies of public health, emergency response, and pediatric providers in the event of large-scale emergencies or disasters that overwhelm local or state pediatric resources. The planning and development of the Network is proceeding through three general phases--information sharing, mutual goal setting and collective action, and long-term formal linkages. In Phase 1, critical planning tasks to be undertaken in the development of the Network were identified. In Phase 2, the agencies developed a draft operational handbook that served as the basis for a formal memorandum of understanding. In Phase 3, participants will engage in exercises and evaluations that will further identify and work out logistical and operational details.  (+info)

Radiation injury after a nuclear detonation: medical consequences and the need for scarce resources allocation. (4/12)

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Pandemic response lessons from influenza H1N1 2009 in Asia. (5/12)

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Hospital all-risk emergency preparedness in Ghana. (6/12)

OBJECTIVE: This paper assessed the emergency preparedness programs of health facilities for all-risks but focused on Road Traffic Accidents, (RTA) resulting in surge demand. It adopted W. H. O checklist covering hospital preparedness, equipment, manpower and surge capacity planning as best practices for the mitigation of public health emergencies. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study of purposively selected health facilities. The method used consisted of site visit, questionnaire survey, literature and internet review. The W. H. O. standard for emergency preparedness of health facilities was used to evaluate and assess the nation's hospitals surge capacity programs. The study was conducted between March-June, 2010. A total of 22 district and regional health facilities including teaching hospitals participated in the study. All 10 regions of the country were covered. RESULT: These were: (1) many of the nation's hospitals were not prepared for large RTA's resulting in surge demands, and did not possess general emergency preparedness programs. (2) The hospitals' respective abilities to handle large scale RTA's were compromised by the lack of competent medical and allied health personnel and adequate supplies. DISCUSSION: The inadequacies of the hospital system in responding to emergencies raise serious public health concerns. The biggest challenge facing the hospitals in their emergency intervention is the lack of pre-emergency and emergency preparedness plans as well as the coordination of the hospitals response mechanisms. CONCLUSION: The paper ended with recommendations on how the nation's hospitals and their supervisory agencies could improve emergency preparedness.  (+info)

Lessons learned from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic response in Thailand. (7/12)

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Secondary surge capacity: a framework for understanding long-term access to primary care for medically vulnerable populations in disaster recovery. (8/12)

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