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(1/1217) Ten year follow-up of depression after diagnosis in general practice.

BACKGROUND: Depression is a serious illness with a high recurrence rate, mortality, and suicide rate, and a substantial loss of quality of life. Long-term course of depression, in particular of patients not referred to specialist care, is not completely clear. We performed a study in which the course of depression in general practice was studied for 10 years after the first diagnosis. AIM: To learn more about long-term course and outcome of patients with depressive illness for a full 10 years after diagnosis. METHOD: A historic cohort study with 386 patients classified as depressive before January 1984, recruited from four general practices belonging to the Continuous Morbidity Registry of the University of Nijmegen in The Netherlands. This cohort was followed up for 10 years. Mortality was compared with a control group matched for age, sex, social class, and practice. Of 222 patients out of this cohort who could be followed up for a full 10 years after diagnosis, the case records were studied in detail. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found in mortality between the 386 patients and the control group. Recurrence of depressive episodes did not occur in about 60% of the 222 patients (confidence interval 54% to 67%). Of the depressive patients, 15% were referred to secondary care and 9% were admitted to hospital. CONCLUSION: Mortality, suicide, and recurrence rate were lower than expected, taking into account what is known from depression studies in psychiatry. These results stress the importance of long-term prospective follow-up studies of all patients with depression because of the emphasis on case-finding and treatment without exact knowledge of long-term course and outcome of patients who were not referred.  (+info)

(2/1217) Drug problems dealt with by 62 London casualty departments. A preliminary report.

A study of the whole spectrum of drug incidents dealt with in one month by 62 casualty departments in the Greater London area was carried out in the summer of 1975. Apart from demonstrating the large number of such incidents, this preliminary report presents an analysis of the drugs responsible for these episodes, basic demographic characteristics of the drug users, and an estimate of the contribution of drug dependence.  (+info)

(3/1217) Evaluation and treatment of patients with suicidal ideation.

Suicidal ideation is more common than completed suicide. Most persons who commit suicide have a psychiatric disorder at the time of death. Because many patients with psychiatric disorders are seen by family physicians and other primary care practitioners rather than by psychiatrists, it is important that these practitioners recognize the signs and symptoms of the psychiatric disorders (particularly alcohol abuse and major depression) that are associated with suicide. Although most patients with suicidal ideation do not ultimately commit suicide, the extent of suicidal ideation must be determined, including the presence of a suicide plan and the patient's means to commit suicide.  (+info)

(4/1217) A worldwide assessment of the frequency of suicide, suicide attempts, or psychiatric hospitalization after predictive testing for Huntington disease.

Prior to the implementation of predictive-testing programs for Huntington disease (HD), significant concern was raised concerning the likelihood of catastrophic events (CEs), particularly in those persons receiving an increased-risk result. We have investigated the frequency of CEs-that is, suicide, suicide attempt, and psychiatric hospitalization-after an HD predictive-testing result, through questionnaires sent to predictive-testing centers worldwide. A total of 44 persons (0.97%) in a cohort of 4,527 test participants had a CE: 5 successful suicides, 21 suicide attempts, and 18 hospitalizations for psychiatric reasons. All persons committing suicide had signs of HD, whereas 11 (52.4%) of 21 persons attempting suicide and 8 (44.4%) of 18 who had a psychiatric hospitalization were symptomatic. A total of 11 (84.6%) of 13 asymptomatic persons who experienced a CE during the first year after HD predictive testing received an increased-risk result. Factors associated with an increased risk of a CE included (a) a psychiatric history +info)

(5/1217) Acute barium intoxication following ingestion of ceramic glaze.

A case of deliberate overdose of barium sulphide in a psychiatric setting is presented, with resulting flaccid paralysis, malignant arrhythmia, respiratory arrest and severe hypokalaemia, but ultimately with complete recovery. The degree of paralysis appears to be related directly to serum barium levels. The value of early haemodialysis, particularly with respiratory paralysis and hypokalaemia, is emphasised.  (+info)

(6/1217) Epidemic of self-poisoning with seeds of the yellow oleander tree (Thevetia peruviana) in northern Sri Lanka.

Deliberate self-harm is an important problem in the developing world. Ingestion of yellow oleander seeds (Thevetia peruviana) has recently become a popular method of self-harm in northern Sri Lanka -- there are now thousands of cases each year. These seeds contain cardiac glycosides that cause vomiting, dizziness, and cardiac dysrhythmias such as conduction block affecting the sinus and AV nodes. This paper reports a study of the condition's mortality and morbidity conducted in 1995 in Anuradhapura General Hospital, a secondary referral centre serving 750 000 people in Sri Lanka's north central province. 415 cases were admitted to the hospital during 11 months; 61% were women and 46% were less than 21 years old. A prospective study of 79 patients showed that 6% died soon after admission. 43% presented with marked cardiac dysrhythmias which necessitated ther transfer to the coronary care unit in Colombo for prophylactic temporary cardiac pacing. The reasons for the acts of self-harm were often relatively trivial, particularly in children; most denied that they wished to die. Unfortunately, the case fatality rate for oleander poisoning in Sri Lanka is at least 10%. This epidemic is not only causing many unnecessary deaths, it is also putting immense stress on the already stretched Sri Lankan health services. There is an urgent need for an intervention which could be used in rural hospitals, thus preventing the hazardous and expensive emergency transfer of patients to the capital.  (+info)

(7/1217) Serotonin syndrome caused by overdose with paroxetine and moclobemide.

Well known clinical syndromes can be produced by overdose with more commonly ingested substances such as opiates or tricyclic antidepressants. A case of a much more unusual syndrome presenting to the accident and emergency department resulting from overdose with a combination of tablets is reported. The clinical presentation of serotonin syndrome and its management are described. This resulted from acute ingestion of paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, and moclobemide, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor.  (+info)

(8/1217) Prevalence and correlates of survival sex among runaway and homeless youth.

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the prevalence and correlates of survival sex among runaway and homeless youths. METHODS: A nationally representative sample of shelter youths and a multicity sample of street youths were interviewed. RESULTS: Approximately 28% of street youths and 10% of shelter youths reported having participated in survival sex, which was associated with age, days away from home, victimization, criminal behaviors, substance use, suicide attempts, sexually transmitted disease, and pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Intensive and ongoing services are needed to provide resources and residential assistance to enable runaway and homeless youths to avoid survival sex, which is associated with many problem behaviors.  (+info)