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(1/4730) Classification of thermophilic streptomycetes, including the description of Streptomyces thermoalcalitolerans sp. nov.

A polyphasic taxonomic study was undertaken to clarify relationships within and between representative thermophilic alkalitolerant streptomycetes isolated from soil and appropriate marker strains. The resultant data, notably those from DNA-DNA relatedness studies, support the taxonomic integrity of the validly described species Streptomyces thermodiastaticus, Streptomyces thermoviolaceus and Streptomyces thermovulgaris. However, the genotypic and phenotypic data clearly show that Streptomyces thermonitrificans Desai and Dhala 1967 and S. thermovulgaris (Henssen 1957) Goodfellow et al. 1987 represent a single species. On the basis of priority, S. thermonitrificans is a later subjective synonym of S. thermovulgaris. Similarly, 10 out of the 11 representative thermophilic alkalitolerant isolates had a combination of properties consistent with their classification as S. thermovulgaris. The remaining thermophilic alkalitolerant isolate, Streptomyces strain TA56, merited species status. The name Streptomyces thermoalcalitolerans sp. nov. is proposed for this strain. A neutrophilic thermophilic isolate, Streptomyces strain NAR85, was identified as S. thermodiastaticus.  (+info)

(2/4730) Diperamycin, a new antimicrobial antibiotic produced by Streptomyces griseoaurantiacus MK393-AF2. I. Taxonomy, fermentation, isolation, physico-chemical properties and biological activities.

Antibacterial antibiotics, diperamycin (1) was produced in the culture broth of Streptomyces griseoaurantiacus MK393-AF2. Various spectroscopic analyses of 1 suggested that 1 belonged to a member of cyclic hexadepsipeptide antibiotic. Antibiotic 1 had potent inhibitory activity against various Gram-positive bacteria including Enterococcus seriolicida and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.  (+info)

(3/4730) Characterization of an insertion sequence element associated with genetically diverse plant pathogenic Streptomyces spp.

Streptomycetes are common soil inhabitants, yet few described species are plant pathogens. While the pathogenicity mechanisms remain unclear, previous work identified a gene, nec1, which encodes a putative pathogenicity or virulence factor. nec1 and a neighboring transposase pseudogene, ORFtnp, are conserved among unrelated plant pathogens and absent from nonpathogens. The atypical GC content of nec1 suggests that it was acquired through horizontal transfer events. Our investigation of the genetic organization of regions adjacent to the 3' end of nec1 in Streptomyces scabies 84.34 identified a new insertion sequence (IS) element, IS1629, with homology to other IS elements from prokaryotic animal pathogens. IS1629 is 1,462 bp with 26-bp terminal inverted repeats and encodes a putative 431-amino-acid (aa) transposase. Transposition of IS1629 generates a 10-bp target site duplication. A 77-nucleotide (nt) sequence encompassing the start codon and upstream region of the transposase was identified which could function in the posttranscritpional regulation of transposase synthesis. A functional copy of IS1629 from S. turgidiscabies 94.09 (Hi-C-13) was selected in the transposon trap pCZA126, through its insertion into the lambda cI857 repressor. IS1629 is present in multiple copies in some S. scabies strains and is present in all S. acidiscabies and S. turgidiscabies strains examined. A second copy of IS1629 was identified between ORFtnp and nec1 in S. acidiscabies strains. The diversity of IS1629 hybridization profiles was greatest within S. scabies. IS1629 was absent from the 27 nonpathogenic Streptomyces strains tested. The genetic organization and nucleotide sequence of the nec1-IS1629 region was conserved and identical among representatives of S. acidiscabies and S. turgidiscabies. These findings support our current model for the unidirectional transfer of the ORFtnp-nec1-IS1629 locus from IS1629-containing S. scabies (type II) to S. acidiscabies and S. turgidiscabies.  (+info)

(4/4730) Electron microscopy studies of cell-wall-anchored cellulose (Avicel)-binding protein (AbpS) from Streptomyces reticuli.

Streptomyces reticuli produces a 35-kDa cellulose (Avicel)-binding protein (AbpS) which interacts strongly with crystalline cellulose but not with soluble types of cellulose. Antibodies that were highly specific for the NH2-terminal part of AbpS were isolated by using truncated AbpS proteins that differed in the length of the NH2 terminus. Using these antibodies for immunolabelling and investigations in which fluorescence, transmission electron, or immunofield scanning electron microscopy was used showed that the NH2 terminus of AbpS protrudes from the murein layer of S. reticuli. Additionally, inspection of ultrathin sections of the cell wall, as well as biochemical experiments performed with isolated murein, revealed that AbpS is tightly and very likely covalently linked to the polyglucane layer. As AbpS has also been found to be associated with protoplasts, we predicted that a COOH-terminal stretch consisting of 17 hydrophobic amino acids anchors the protein to the membrane. Different amounts of AbpS homologues of several Streptomyces strains were synthesized.  (+info)

(5/4730) Multiple genetic modifications of the erythromycin polyketide synthase to produce a library of novel "unnatural" natural products.

The structures of complex polyketide natural products, such as erythromycin, are programmed by multifunctional polyketide synthases (PKSs) that contain modular arrangements of functional domains. The colinearity between the activities of modular PKS domains and structure of the polyketide product portends the generation of novel organic compounds-"unnatural" natural products-by genetic manipulation. We have engineered the erythromycin polyketide synthase genes to effect combinatorial alterations of catalytic activities in the biosynthetic pathway, generating a library of >50 macrolides that would be impractical to produce by chemical methods. The library includes examples of analogs with one, two, and three altered carbon centers of the polyketide products. The manipulation of multiple biosynthetic steps in a PKS is an important milestone toward the goal of producing large libraries of unnatural natural products for biological and pharmaceutical applications.  (+info)

(6/4730) Evolutionary relationships among diverse bacteriophages and prophages: all the world's a phage.

We report DNA and predicted protein sequence similarities, implying homology, among genes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages and prophages spanning a broad phylogenetic range of host bacteria. The sequence matches reported here establish genetic connections, not always direct, among the lambdoid phages of Escherichia coli, phage phiC31 of Streptomyces, phages of Mycobacterium, a previously unrecognized cryptic prophage, phiflu, in the Haemophilus influenzae genome, and two small prophage-like elements, phiRv1 and phiRv2, in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The results imply that these phage genes, and very possibly all of the dsDNA tailed phages, share common ancestry. We propose a model for the genetic structure and dynamics of the global phage population in which all dsDNA phage genomes are mosaics with access, by horizontal exchange, to a large common genetic pool but in which access to the gene pool is not uniform for all phage.  (+info)

(7/4730) Characterization of aklavinone-11-hydroxylase from Streptomyces purpurascens.

Aklavinone-11-hydroxylase (RdmE) is a FAD monooxygenase participating in the biosynthesis of daunorubicin, doxorubicin and rhodomycins. The rdmE gene encodes an enzyme of 535 amino acids. The sequence of the Streptomyces purpurascens enzyme is similar to other Streptomyces aromatic polyketide hydroxylases. We overexpressed the gene in Streptomyces lividans and purified aklavinone-11-hydroxylase to apparent homogeneity with four chromatographic steps utilizing a kinetic photometric enzyme assay. The enzyme is active as the monomer with a molecular mass of 60 kDa; it hydroxylates aklavinone and other anthracyclinones. Aklavinone-11-hydroxylase can use both NADH and NADPH as coenzyme but it is slowly inactivated in the presence of NADH. The apparent Km for NADPH is 2 mM and for aklavinone 10 microM. The enzyme is inactivated in the presence of phenylglyoxal and 2,3-butanedione. NADPH protects against inactivation of aklavinone-11-hydroxylase by phenylglyoxal.  (+info)

(8/4730) A 20-kDa domain is required for phosphatidic acid-induced allosteric activation of phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus.

Two phospholipase D (PLD) enzymes with both hydrolase and transferase activities were isolated from Streptomyces chromofuscus. There were substantial differences in the kinetic properties of the two PLD enzymes towards monomeric, micellar, and vesicle substrates. The most striking difference was that the higher molecular weight enzyme (PLD57 approximately 57 kDa) could be activated allosterically with a low mole fraction of phosphatidic acid (PA) incorporated into a PC bilayer (Geng et al., J. Biol. Chem. 273 (1998) 12195-12202). PLD42/20, a tightly associated complex of two peptides, one of 42 kDa and the other 20 kDa, had a 4-6-fold higher Vmax toward PC substrates than PLD57 and was not activated by PA. N-Terminal sequencing of both enzymes indicated that both components of PLD42/20 were cleavage products of PLD57. The larger component included the N-terminal segment of PLD57 and contained the active site. The N-terminus of the smaller peptide corresponded to the C-terminal region of PLD57; this peptide had no PLD activity by itself. Increasing the pH of PLD42/20 to 8.9, followed by chromatography of PLD42/20 on a HiTrap Q column at pH 8.5 separated the 42- and 20-kDa proteins. The 42-kDa complex had about the same specific activity with or without the 20-kDa fragment. The lack of PA activation for the 42-kDa protein and for PLD42/20 indicates that an intact C-terminal region of PLD57 is necessary for activation by PA. Furthermore, the mechanism for transmission of the allosteric signal requires an intact PLD57.  (+info)