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(1/3051) Cryo-electron microscopy structure of an SH3 amyloid fibril and model of the molecular packing.

Amyloid fibrils are assemblies of misfolded proteins and are associated with pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and the spongiform encephalopathies. In the amyloid diseases, a diverse group of normally soluble proteins self-assemble to form insoluble fibrils. X-ray fibre diffraction studies have shown that the protofilament cores of fibrils formed from the various proteins all contain a cross-beta-scaffold, with beta-strands perpendicular and beta-sheets parallel to the fibre axis. We have determined the threedimensional structure of an amyloid fibril, formed by the SH3 domain of phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase, using cryo-electron microscopy and image processing at 25 A resolution. The structure is a double helix of two protofilament pairs wound around a hollow core, with a helical crossover repeat of approximately 600 A and an axial subunit repeat of approximately 27 A. The native SH3 domain is too compact to fit into the fibril density, and must unfold to adopt a longer, thinner shape in the amyloid form. The 20x40-A protofilaments can only accommodate one pair of flat beta-sheets stacked against each other, with very little inter-strand twist. We propose a model for the polypeptide packing as a basis for understanding the structure of amyloid fibrils in general.  (+info)

(2/3051) Socs1 binds to multiple signalling proteins and suppresses steel factor-dependent proliferation.

We have identified Socs1 as a downstream component of the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase signalling pathway. We show that the expression of Socs1 mRNA is rapidly increased in primary bone marrow-derived mast cells following exposure to Steel factor, and Socs1 inducibly binds to the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase via its Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. Previous studies have shown that Socs1 suppresses cytokine-mediated differentiation in M1 cells inhibiting Janus family kinases. In contrast, constitutive expression of Socs1 suppresses the mitogenic potential of Kit while maintaining Steel factor-dependent cell survival signals. Unlike Janus kinases, Socs1 does not inhibit the catalytic activity of the Kit tyrosine kinase. In order to define the mechanism by which Socs1-mediated suppression of Kit-dependent mitogenesis occurs, we demonstrate that Socs1 binds to the signalling proteins Grb-2 and the Rho-family guanine nucleotide exchange factors Vav. We show that Grb2 binds Socs1 via its SH3 domains to putative diproline determinants located in the N-terminus of Socs1, and Socs1 binds to the N-terminal regulatory region of Vav. These data suggest that Socs1 is an inducible switch which modulates proliferative signals in favour of cell survival signals and functions as an adaptor protein in receptor tyrosine kinase signalling pathways.  (+info)

(3/3051) Anopheles gambiae Ag-STAT, a new insect member of the STAT family, is activated in response to bacterial infection.

A new insect member of the STAT family of transcription factors (Ag-STAT) has been cloned from the human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. The domain involved in DNA interaction and the SH2 domain are well conserved. Ag-STAT is most similar to Drosophila D-STAT and to vertebrate STATs 5 and 6, constituting a proposed ancient class A of the STAT family. The mRNA is expressed at all developmental stages, and the protein is present in hemocytes, pericardial cells, midgut, skeletal muscle and fat body cells. There is no evidence of transcriptional activation following bacterial challenge. However, bacterial challenge results in nuclear translocation of Ag-STAT protein in fat body cells and induction of DNA-binding activity that recognizes a STAT target site. In vitro treatment with pervanadate (vanadate and H2O2) translocates Ag-STAT to the nucleus in midgut epithelial cells. This is the first evidence of direct participation of the STAT pathway in immune responses in insects.  (+info)

(4/3051) DEF-1, a novel Src SH3 binding protein that promotes adipogenesis in fibroblastic cell lines.

The Src homology 3 (SH3) motif is found in numerous signal transduction proteins involved in cellular growth and differentiation. We have purified and cloned a novel protein, DEF-1 (differentiation-enhancing factor), from bovine brain by using a Src SH3 affinity column. Ectopic expression of DEF-1 in fibroblasts resulted in the differentiation of a significant fraction of the culture into adipocytes. This phenotype appears to be related to the induction of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), since DEF-1 NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated augmented levels of PPARgamma mRNA and, when treated with activating PPARgamma ligands, efficient induction of differentiation. Further evidence for a role for DEF-1 in adipogenesis was provided by heightened expression of DEF-1 mRNA in adipose tissue isolated from obese and diabetes mice compared to that in tissue isolated from wild-type mice. However, DEF-1 mRNA was detected in multiple tissues, suggesting that the signal transduction pathway(s) in which DEF-1 is involved is not limited to adipogenesis. These results suggest that DEF-1 is an important component of a signal transduction process that is involved in the differentiation of fibroblasts and possibly of other types of cells.  (+info)

(5/3051) Identification of a new Pyk2 target protein with Arf-GAP activity.

Protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2 is activated by a variety of G-protein-coupled receptors and by extracellular signals that elevate intracellular Ca2+ concentration. We have identified a new Pyk2 binding protein designated Pap. Pap is a multidomain protein composed of an N-terminal alpha-helical region with a coiled-coil motif, followed by a pleckstrin homology domain, an Arf-GAP domain, an ankyrin homology region, a proline-rich region, and a C-terminal SH3 domain. We demonstrate that Pap forms a stable complex with Pyk2 and that activation of Pyk2 leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of Pap in living cells. Immunofluorescence experiments demonstrate that Pap is localized in the Golgi apparatus and at the plasma membrane, where it is colocalized with Pyk2. In addition, in vitro recombinant Pap exhibits strong GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity towards the small GTPases Arf1 and Arf5 and weak activity towards Arf6. Addition of recombinant Pap protein to Golgi preparations prevented Arf-dependent generation of post-Golgi vesicles in vitro. Moreover, overexpression of Pap in cultured cells reduced the constitutive secretion of a marker protein. We propose that Pap functions as a GAP for Arf and that Pyk2 may be involved in regulation of vesicular transport through its interaction with Pap.  (+info)

(6/3051) Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated signaling pathways in human neutrophils. Involvement of Jak2 in the stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) regulates many of the biological activities of human neutrophils. The signaling pathways via which these effects are mediated are not fully understood. We have shown previously that GM-CSF treatment of human neutrophils activates the Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/STAT) pathway and, more specifically, Jak2, STAT3, and STAT5B in neutrophils. GM-CSF also stimulates the activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) in a tyrosine kinase-dependent manner. Here we report that pretreating the cells with a Jak2 inhibitor (AG-490) abolishes tyrosine phosphorylation of the p85 subunit of PI3-kinase induced by GM-CSF. Furthermore, p85 was found to associate with Jak2, but not with Lyn, in stimulated cells in situ and with its autophosphorylated form in vitro; however, Jak2 did not bind to either of the two Src homology 2 (SH2) domains of the p85 subunit of PI3-kinase. Although STAT5B bound to the carboxyl-terminal SH2 domain of p85, it was absent from the complex containing PI3-kinase and Jak2. These results suggest that stimulation of the activity of PI3-kinase induced by GM-CSF is mediated by Jak2 and that the association between Jak2 and p85 depends on an adaptor protein yet to be identified.  (+info)

(7/3051) C-terminal Src kinase associates with ligand-stimulated insulin-like growth factor-I receptor.

Increased expression of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) protein-tyrosine kinase occurs in several kinds of cancer and induces neoplastic transformation in fibroblast cell lines. The transformed phenotype can be reversed by interfering with the function of the IGF-IR. The IGF-IR is required for transformation by a number of viral and cellular oncoproteins, including SV40 large T antigen, Ras, Raf, and Src. The IGF-IR is a substrate for Src in vitro and is phosphorylated in v-Src-transformed cells. We observed that the IGF-IR and IR associated with the C-terminal Src kinase (CSK) following ligand stimulation. We found that the SH2 domain of CSK binds to the tyrosine-phosphorylated form of IGF-IR and IR. We determined the tyrosine residues in the IGF-IR and in the IR responsible for this interaction. We also observed that fibroblasts stimulated with IGF-I or insulin showed a rapid and transient decrease in c-Src tyrosine kinase activity. The results suggest that c-Src and CSK are involved in IGF-IR and IR signaling and that the interaction of CSK with the IGF-IR may play a role in the decrease in c-Src activity following IGF-I stimulation.  (+info)

(8/3051) Identification of Grb4/Nckbeta, a src homology 2 and 3 domain-containing adapter protein having similar binding and biological properties to Nck.

Adapter proteins made up of Src homology (SH) domains mediate multiple cellular signaling events initiated by receptor protein tyrosine kinases. Here we report that Grb4 is an adapter protein closely related to but distinct from Nck that is made up of three SH3 domains and one SH2 domain. Northern analysis indicated that both genes are expressed in multiple tissues. Both Nck and Grb4 proteins could associate with receptor tyrosine kinases and the SH3-binding proteins PAK, Sos1, and PRK2, and they synergized with v-Abl and Sos to induce gene expression via the transcription factor Elk-1. Although neither protein was transforming on its own, both Nck and Grb4 cooperated with v-Abl to transform NIH 3T3 cells and influenced the morphology and anchorage-dependent growth of wild type Ras-transformed cells. Nck and Grb4 therefore appear to be functionally redundant.  (+info)