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(1/3086) Specific receptors for glucocorticoid in the cytoplasm of the liver of AH 130 tumor-bearing rats.

Specific receptors for dexamethasone (11beta, 17alpha, 21-trihydroxy-9alpha-fluoro-16alpha-methyl-1,4-pregnadiene-3,20-dione) in the cytoplasm of the liver from AH 130 (solid type) tumor-bearing rats markedly increased in the advanced stage of tumor growth. The cytoplasmic receptors of the livers of normal and tumor-bearing rats differed in their affinities for dexamethasone, and their apparent equilibrium (dissociation) constants (K) for dexamethasone were 4.0 and 2.6 X 10(-9) M, respectively. The rates of dissociation of dexamethasone-receptor complexes and the heat denaturations of the receptors in the livers of normal and tumor-bearing rats were similar. The glucocorticoid receptors of tumor-bearing rat liver had slightly higher affinities than did those of normal liver for all the steroids tested. Only a trace amount of receptors for dexamethasone could be detected in the cytoplasm of AH 130 ascites cells.  (+info)

(2/3086) The effects of glucocorticoids and progesterone on hormone-responsive human breast cancer in long-term tissue culture.

Glucocorticoids, at physiological concentration, inhibit cell division and thymidine incorporation in three lines of human breast cancer maintained in long-term tissue culture. At steroid concentrations sufficient to inhibit thymidine incorporation 50%, little or no effect is seen on protein synthesis 48 hr after hormone addition. All three of these lines are shown to have glucocorticoid receptors demonstrable by competitive protein binding assays. Receptors are extensively characterized in one line by sucrose density gradient analysis and binding specificity studies. Good correlation between receptor-binding specificity and biological activity is found except for progesterone, which binds to glucocorticoid receptor but is noninhibitory. Cross-competition and quantification studies demonstrate a separate receptor for progesterone. This receptor has limited binding specificities restricted largely to progestational agents, whereas the glucocorticoid receptor bound both glucocorticoids and progesterone. Two other human breast cancer lines neither contain glucocorticoid receptor nor are inhibited by glucocorticoids. It is concluded that in some cases glucocorticoids can directly limit growth in human breast cancer in vitro without requiring alterations in other trophic hormones.  (+info)

(3/3086) Effect of hepatocarcinogens on the binding of glucocorticoid-receptor complex in rat liver nuclei.

The effects of a number of carcinogens and hepatotoxins on the binding kinetics of the interactions of glucocorticoidcytosol receptor complex with nuclear acceptor sites in rat liver were investigated. Both the apparent sites in rat liver were investigated. Both the apparent concentration of nuclear binding sites and the Kd were significantly diminished following treatment of rats with sublethal doses of the carcinogens aflatoxin B1, diethylnitrosamine, dimethylnitrosamine, thioacetamide, 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene, 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene, and 3-methylcholanthrene. Treatment with actinomycin D resulted in a slight reduction in the apparent concentration of nuclear acceptor sites but had no effect on the nuclear binding Kd. The hepatotoxic but noncarcinogenic analgesic, acetaminophen, as well as the weakly toxic aflatoxin B1 cognate, aflatoxin B2, were without effect on the kinetics or binding capacity of glucocorticoid-nuclear acceptor site interaction. These experiments suggest that chemically induced alteration of functional glucocorticoid binding sites on chromatin may be involved in the biochemical effects produced in liver by carcinogens of several chemical types. This experimental model may provide a useful approach for further elucidation of early events in carcinogenesis.  (+info)

(4/3086) The cytoskeletal network controls c-Jun expression and glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity in an antagonistic and cell-type-specific manner.

The physical and functional link between adhesion molecules and the cytoskeletal network suggests that the cytoskeleton might mediate the transduction of cell-to-cell contact signals, which often regulate growth and differentiation in an antagonistic manner. Depolymerization of the cytoskeleton in confluent cell cultures is reportedly sufficient to initiate DNA synthesis. Here we show that depolymerization of the cytoskeleton is also sufficient to repress differentiation-specific gene expression. Glutamine synthetase is a glia-specific differentiation marker gene whose expression in the retinal tissue is regulated by glucocorticoids and is ultimately dependent on glia-neuron cell contacts. Depolymerization of the actin or microtubule network in cells of the intact retina mimics the effects of cell separation, repressing glutamine synthetase induction by a mechanism that involves induction of c-Jun and inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity. Depolymerization of the cytoskeleton activates JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and induces c-Jun expression by a signaling pathway that depends on tyrosine kinase activity. Induction of c-Jun expression is restricted to Muller glial cells, the only cells in the tissue that express glutamine synthetase and maintain the ability to proliferate upon cell separation. Our results suggest that the cytoskeletal network might play a part in the transduction of cell contact signals to the nucleus.  (+info)

(5/3086) Glucocorticoid receptor immunoreactivity in neurons and pituitary cells implicated in reproductive functions in rainbow trout: a double immunohistochemical study.

In order to identify the nature of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-expressing neurons and pituitary cells that potentially mediate the negative effects of stress on reproductive performance, double immunohistochemical stainings were performed in the brain and pituitary of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To avoid possible cross-reactions during the double staining studies, combinations of primary antibodies raised in different species were used, and we report here the generation of an antibody raised in guinea pig against the rainbow trout glucocorticoid receptor (rtGR). The results obtained in vitellogenic females showed that GnRH-positive neurons in the caudal telencephalon/anterior preoptic region consistently exhibited rtGR immunoreactivity. Similarly, in the anterior ventral preoptic region, a group of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons, known for inhibiting gonadotropin (GTH)-2 secretion during vitellogenesis, was consistently shown to strongly express GR. Finally, we show that a large majority of the GTH-1 (FSH-like) and GTH-2 (LH-like) cells of the pituitary exhibit rtGR immunoreactivity. These results indicate that cortisol may affect the neuroendocrine control of the reproductive process of the rainbow trout at multiple sites.  (+info)

(6/3086) Maternal adrenocortical hormones maintain the early development of pancreatic B cells in the fetal rat.

To investigate the effect of maternal adrenocortical hormones on the development of fetal pancreatic islet cells, pregnant rats were adrenalectomised on d 6 of gestation. On d 12-16 the growth patterns of fetal insulin-producing B cells, glucagon-producing A cells, and somatostatin-producing D cells were observed histometrically. Maternal adrenalectomy resulted in growth retardation of fetal B cells on d 12-15. Maternal corticosterone therapy prevented this retardation. Maternal adrenalectomy, however, did not affect the developmental patterns of A and D cells. By Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, glucocorticoid receptors were demonstrated to be present in the islet cells from d 12 to d 15. These results suggest that maternal adrenocortical hormones, glucocorticoids in particular, maintain the early development of fetal pancreatic B cells through their specific intracellular glucocorticoid receptor.  (+info)

(7/3086) Purification of two dexamethasone-binding proteins from rat-liver cytosol.

Two dexamethasone-binding proteins have been purified from rat liver cytosol. The main purification steps are: precipitation by protamine sulphate, affinity chromatography on CH-Sepharose 4B to which 11-deoxycorticosterone is linked through a disulfide bond and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Two binding components elute from the DEAE-cellulose column at 0.12 M and 0.2 M NaCl, respectively. By means of dodecylsulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis it was demonstrated that both components are composed predominantly of a single polypeptide with molecular weights of about 45 000 and 90 000. Antibodies to the two polypeptides have been elicited in rabbits. The antibodies to the 45 000-Mr polypeptide cross react with the 90 000-Mr component. Likewise the antibodies to the 90 000-Mr protein precipitate the 45 000-Mr polypeptide. Either of the two antibody preparations immunoprecipitates the major part (approximately 70%) of the dexamethasone-binding activity of the cytosol.  (+info)

(8/3086) RT-PCR quantification of AHR, ARNT, GR, and CYP1A1 mRNA in craniofacial tissues of embryonic mice exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and hydrocortisone.

C57BL/6N mouse embryos exposed to hydrocortisone (HC) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) develop cleft palate. An interaction between these agents produces clefts at doses which alone are not teratogenic. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and dioxin receptor (AhR) mediated these responses and their gene expression was altered by TCDD and/or HC in palates examined on gestation day (GD) 14 by Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. The present study quantifies AhR, AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT), and GR mRNA at 4, 12, 24, and 48 h after exposure (time 0 = dose administration at 8 A.M. on gestation day 12) on GD12 to TCDD (24 micrograms/kg), HC (100 mg/kg) or HC (25 mg/kg) + TCDD (3 micrograms/kg). The induction of CYP1A1 mRNA was also quantified at 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h for control and TCDD-exposed samples. Total RNA was prepared from midfacial tissue of 4-6 embryos/litter at each time and dose. An RNA internal standard (IS) for each gene was synthesized, which included the gene's primer sequences separated by a pUC19 plasmid sequence. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed on total RNA + IS using a range of 5-7 IS concentrations across a constant level of total RNA. PCR products were separated in gels (mRNA and IS-amplified sequences differed by 30-50 bases), ethidium bromide-stained, imaged (Hamamatsu Photonics Systems, Bridgewater, NJ), and quantified with NIH Image. CYP1A1 mRNA was significantly induced in the TCDD-exposed samples at all time points examined (p = 0.005 at 2 h and 0.001 after 2 h). During palatal shelf outgrowth on GD12, AhR mRNA levels increased significantly and this was not affected by treatment with TCDD or HC + TCDD. A significant increase in GR was detected at 24 h (p < 0.05) and this was unaffected by any of the exposures. Expression of ARNT increased at 12 h (p < 0.001); however, treatment with HC or HC + TCDD blocked this increase (p < 0.05). At 24 h, the TCDD-treated embryos had significantly lower ARNT mRNA compared with controls (p < 0.001). The relative overall expression level of the genes was AhR > ARNT > GR. Within individuals, expression of AhR and/or ARNT was highly correlated with GR level. In conclusion, CYP1A1 mRNA was expressed in developing craniofacial tissue and was highly induced by TCDD exposure. AhR, ARNT, and GR mRNA are upregulated in early palatogenesis, although not on the same schedule. The TCDD-induced decrease in ARNT at 24 h after dosing and the HC and HC + TCDD-induced delay in upregulation of ARNT may affect the dynamics of heterodimer formation between AhR and ARNT. The changes in ARNT mRNA level could also affect availability of this transcriptional regulator to interact with other potential partners, and these effects, separately or in combination, may be involved in disruption of normal embryonic development.  (+info)