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(1/2898) Acute haemodynamic and proteinuric effects of prednisolone in patients with a nephrotic syndrome.

BACKGROUND: Administration of prednisolone causes an abrupt rise in proteinuria in patients with a nephrotic syndrome. METHODS: To clarify the mechanisms responsible for this increase in proteinuria we have performed a placebo controlled study in 26 patients with a nephrotic syndrome. Systemic and renal haemodynamics and urinary protein excretion were measured after prednisolone and after placebo. RESULTS: After i.v. administration of 125-150 mg prednisolone total proteinuria increased from 6.66+/-4.42 to 9.37+/-6.07 mg/min (P<0.001). By analysing the excretion of proteins with different charge and weight (albumin, transferrin, IgG, IgG4 and beta2-microglobulin) it became apparent that the increase of proteinuria was the result of a change in size selectivity rather than a change in glomerular charge selectivity or tubular protein reabsorption. Glomerular filtration rate rose from 83+/-34 ml to 95+/-43 ml/min (P<0.001) after 5 h, whereas effective renal plasma flow and endogenous creatinine clearance remained unchanged. As a result filtration fraction was increased, compatible with an increased glomerular pressure, which probably contributes to the size selectivity changes. Since corticosteroids affect both the renin-angiotensin system and renal prostaglandins, we have evaluated the effects of prednisolone on proteinuria after pretreatment with 3 months of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor lisinopril or after 2 weeks of the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin. Neither drug had any effect on prednisolone-induced increases of proteinuria. CONCLUSIONS: Prednisolone increases proteinuria by changing the size selective barrier of the glomerular capillary. Neither the renin-angiotensin axis nor prostaglandins seem to be involved in these effects of prednisolone on proteinuria.  (+info)

(2/2898) Primary biliary cirrhosis associated with membranous glomerulonephritis.

A 33-year-old woman was admitted to our department for evaluation of liver dysfunction and proteinuria. A liver biopsy specimen showed ductular proliferation and moderate portal fibrosis indicating stage II primary biliary cirrhosis. A renal biopsy specimen showed mild to moderate mesangial cell proliferation without crescent formation or interstitial nephritis. Immunofluorescent staining revealed deposition of immunoglobulin G (IgG), third component of complement (C3), and Clq on glomerular basement membranes. The findings indicated stage I membranous glomerulonephritis. Administration of ursodesoxycholic acid together with prednisolone, azathioprine, and dipyridamole decreased proteinuria and improved cholestatic liver dysfunction.  (+info)

(3/2898) Effective control of Epstein-Barr virus-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with immunochemotherapy. Histiocyte Society.

The familial form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a lethal disorder. Although the prognosis for Epstein-Barr virus-associated HLH (EBV-HLH) remains uncertain, numerous reports indicate that it can also be fatal in a substantial proportion of cases. We therefore assessed the potential of immunochemotherapy with a core combination of steroids and etoposide to control EBV-HLH in 17 infants and children who met stringent diagnostic criteria for this reactive disorder of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Treatment of life-threatening emergencies was left to the discretion of participating investigators and typically included either intravenous Ig or cyclosporin A (CSA). Five patients (29%) entered complete remission during the induction phase (1 to 2 months), whereas 10 others (57%) required additional treatment to achieve this status. In 2 cases, immunochemotherapy was ineffective, prompting allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Severe but reversible myelosuppression was a common finding; adverse late sequelae were limited to epileptic activity in one child and chronic EBV infection in 2 others. Fourteen of the 17 patients treated with immunochemotherapy have maintained their complete responses for 4+ to 39+ months (median, 15+ months), suggesting a low probability of disease recurrence. These results provide a new perspective on EBV-HLH, showing effective control (and perhaps cure) of the majority of EBV-HLH cases without bone marrow transplantation, using steroids and etoposide, with or without immunomodulatory agents.  (+info)

(4/2898) Th1 and Th2 cytokine mRNA profiles in childhood nephrotic syndrome: evidence for increased IL-13 mRNA expression in relapse.

Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome of childhood is thought to be associated with T lymphocyte dysfunction often triggered by viral infections, with the production of circulating factor(s) resulting in proteinuria. In view of the conflicting evidence of T cell activation and Th1 or Th2 pattern of cytokine synthesis in this disease, this study examined the mRNA expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma, IL-4, and IL-13 from CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in steroid-responsive nephrotic patients in relapse and remission. Fifty-five children with steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome were included in this study, together with 34 normal controls and 24 patient controls with viral infections. RNA was isolated from purified CD4+ or CD8+ cells from peripheral blood and subjected to reverse transcription-PCR. Cytokine mRNA expression was measured semiquantitatively, and a cytokine index was derived from densitometric readings, with cyclophilin as the housekeeping gene. Both cross-sectional and paired data showed an increased CD4+ and CD8+ IL-13 mRNA expression in patients with nephrotic relapse as compared to remission, normal, and patient controls (P < 0.008). This was also associated with increased cytoplasmic IL-13 expression in phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin-activated CD3+ cells (6.66+/-3.39%) from patients with nephrotic relapse compared to remission (2.59+/-1.35%) (P < 0.0001). However, there was no significant difference in CD4+ or CD8+ IL-2, interferon-gamma and IL-4 mRNA expression. IL-13 is an important T cell cytokine with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory functions on B cells and monocytes. It is conceivable that IL-13 may act on monocytes to produce vascular permeability factor(s) involved in the pathogenesis of proteinuria in patients with relapse nephrotic syndrome.  (+info)

(5/2898) A case of eosinophilic myocarditis complicated by Kimura's disease (eosinophilic hyperplastic lymphogranuloma) and erythroderma.

This report describes a patient with eosinophilic myocarditis complicated by Kimura's disease (eosinophilic hyperplastic lymphogranuloma) and erythroderma. A 50-year-old man presented with a complaint of precordial pain. However, the only abnormal finding on examinatioin was eosinophilia (1617 eosinophils/microl). Three years later, the patient developed chronic eczema, and was diagnosed with erythroderma posteczematosa. One year later, a tumor was detected in the right auricule, and a diagnosis of Kimura's disease was made, based on the biopsy findings. The patient developed progressive dyspnea 6 months later and was found to have cardiomegaly and a depressed left ventricular ejection fraction (17%). A diagnosis of eosinophilic myocarditis was made based on the results of a right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy. The eosinophilic myocarditis and erythrodrema were treated with steroids with improvement of both the eosinophilia and left ventricular function.  (+info)

(6/2898) Serum lipoprotein(a) and apolipoprotein(a) phenotypes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

OBJECTIVE: To determine serum lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) concentrations and to analyze the apolipoprotein(a) (Apo[a]) phenotype in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: The subjects included 131 patients with RA and 200 healthy control subjects. Serum Lp(a) concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the Apo(a) phenotype was determined by immunoblotting. HLA-DR typing was also done. RESULTS: The mean serum Lp(a) level was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the RA patients (27.5 mg/dl) than in the controls (15.0 mg/dl). The S3 allele was found in 70.0% of the patients versus 39.5% of the controls (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in HLA-DR4 positivity between patients with and without the S3 phenotype. CONCLUSION: The serum Lp(a) level was increased in patients with RA, possibly partly because of S3 phenotype predominance.  (+info)

(7/2898) Effective immunosuppressive therapy in a patient with primary pulmonary hypertension.

The case history is described of a young woman who presented with primary pulmonary hypertension and non-specific inflammatory signs. The patient received prolonged immunosuppressive treatment with low dose methotrexate and prednisone without any vasodilator agent. After one year the pulmonary artery pressure fell from a mean value of 47 mm Hg to 30 mm Hg and there was a corresponding clinical response. This case suggests that, in patients with pulmonary hypertension of unknown origin, immunopathogenetic factors should be sought in order to consider the utility of immunosuppressive therapy.  (+info)

(8/2898) A pharmacoeconomic analysis of rimexolone for the treatment of ophthalmic inflammatory conditions.

Topical steroids are the standard first-line therapy for treating ophthalmic inflammatory conditions. However, potent ophthalmic steroids can lead to an elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP), which can result in greater medical resource utilization and increased costs. We have developed a decision analysis model from a societal perspective to evaluate the costs and consequences of the treatment of ophthalmic inflammatory conditions with two potent topical steroids: prednisolone and rimexolone. Data for the model are based on information from clinical trials, national data-bases, published literature, and responses by ophthalmologists to a questionnaire on treatment patterns for elevated IOP. Three steroid-responsive conditions are examined separately with the model: uveitis; postoperative inflammation following cataract surgery; and other ophthalmic inflammatory conditions (blepharitis, episcleritis, postoperative refractive surgery, and corneal transplant). The model evaluates patients with acute conditions versus those with chronic conditions and those with mild to moderate elevation of IOP versus those with severe elevation of IOP. Although the unit cost of rimexolone is higher than that of prednisolone, use of rimexolone leads to cost savings because the incidence of elevated IOP is decreased. If rimexolone is used instead of prednisolone for the treatment of ophthalmic inflammatory conditions, the estimated cost saved (at 1995 AWP prices) is approximately $10 million across the entire US population. The savings across the health maintenance organization population on an annualized basis is approximately $3.9 million. Even if rimexolone were priced higher than current market charges (at 130% to 150% of the AWP of prednisolone), cost savings ranging from the $2.9 million to $720,000 would accrue with use of rimexolone compared with prednisolone. However if, rimexolone were priced at 160% of the AWP of prednisolone, its use would incur an additional cost of $300,000. The primary medical resource utilized in treating elevated IOP in ophthalmic inflammatory conditions is physician visits. Medications are responsible for only one-fifth to one-third of the total cost of treating elevated IOP. This analysis indicates that rimexolone is associated with decreased medical resource utilization and cost savings to the entire healthcare system.  (+info)