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(1/3746) Peri-operative changes in echocardiographic measurements and plasma atrial and brain natriuretic peptide concentrations in 3 dogs with patent ductus arteriosus.

Peri-operative changes in echocardiographic measurements and plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were investigated for 1 month in 3 dogs with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Post-operative left ventricular end-diastolic dimention and fractional shortening decreased in all cases. Pre-operatively increased plasma ANP concentrations reduced dramatically after the operation. Peri-operative changes in plasma BNP levels had slightly S-shaped curves in all cases. These observations suggest that post-operative responsiveness of ANP and cardiac function are rapid in comparison with cardiac morphological changes, and BNP has a different pathophysiological significance from ANP in dogs with PDA.  (+info)

(2/3746) Usefulness of fractional flow reserve to predict clinical outcome after balloon angioplasty.

BACKGROUND: After regular coronary balloon angioplasty, it would be helpful to identify those patients who have a low cardiac event rate. Coronary angiography alone is not sensitive enough for that purpose, but it has been suggested that the combination of optimal angiographic and optimal functional results indicates a low restenosis chance. Pressure-derived myocardial fractional flow reserve (FFR) is an index of the functional severity of the residual epicardial lesion and could be useful for that purpose. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 60 consecutive patients with single-vessel disease, balloon angioplasty was performed by use of a pressure instead of a regular guide wire. Both quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and measurement of FFR were performed 15 minutes after the procedure. A successful angioplasty result, defined as a residual diameter stenosis (DS) <50%, was achieved in 58 patients. In these patients, DS and FFR, measured 15 minutes after PTCA, were analyzed in relation to clinical outcome. In those 26 patients with both optimal angiographic (residual DS by QCA /=0.90) results, event-free survival rates at 6, 12, and 24 months were 92+/-5%, 92+/-5%, and 88+/-6%, respectively, versus 72+/-8%, 69+/-8%, and 59+/-9%, respectively, in the remaining 32 patients in whom the angiographic or functional result or both were suboptimal (P=0.047, P=0.028, and P=0.014, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with a residual DS /=0.90, clinical outcome up to 2 years is excellent. Therefore, there is a complementary value of coronary angiography and coronary pressure measurement in the evaluation of PTCA result.  (+info)

(3/3746) Reduction of laparoscopic-induced hypothermia, postoperative pain and recovery room length of stay by pre-conditioning gas with the Insuflow device: a prospective randomized controlled multi-center study.

OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of Insuflow (Georgia BioMedical, Inc.) filter heater hydrator device in reducing the incidence, severity and extent of hypothermia, length of recovery room stay and postoperative pain at the time of laparoscopy. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, blinded, controlled multi-center study. Patients underwent gynecologic procedures via laparoscopy; surgeons, anesthesiologists and recovery room personnel assessed the results. SETTING: Seven North American institutions. PATIENTS: Seventy-two women for safety evaluation and efficacy studies. INTERVENTIONS: Intraoperative pre-conditioning of laparoscopic gas with the Insuflow device (treatment) or standard raw gas (control) during laparoscopic surgery and postoperatively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence, severity and extent of hypothermia, postoperative pain perception and length of recovery room stay. RESULTS: The Insuflow group had significantly less intraoperative hypothermia, reduced length of recovery room stay and reduced postoperative pain. Pre-conditioning of laparoscopic gas by filtering heating and hydrating was well tolerated with no adverse effects. The safety profile of the Insuflow pre-conditioned gas showed significant benefits compared to currently used raw gas. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-conditioning laparoscopic gas by filtering heating and hydrating with the Insuflow device was significantly more effective than the currently used standard raw gas and was safe in reducing or eliminating laparoscopic-induced hypothermia, shortening recovery room length of stay and reducing postoperative pain.  (+info)

(4/3746) Manipulation of total knee replacements. Is the flexion gained retained?

As part of a prospective study of 476 total knee replacements (TKR), we evaluated the use of manipulation under anaesthesia in 47 knees. Manipulation was considered when intensive physiotherapy failed to increase flexion to more than 80 degrees. The mean time from arthroplasty to manipulation was 11.3 weeks (median 9, range 2 to 41). The mean active flexion before manipulation was 62 degrees (35 to 80). One year later the mean gain was 33 degrees (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, range -5 to 70, 95% CI 28.5 to 38.5). Definite sustained gains in flexion were achieved even when manipulation was performed four or more months after arthroplasty (paired t-test, p < 0.01, CI 8.4 to 31.4). A further 21 patients who met our criteria for manipulation declined the procedure. Despite continued physiotherapy, there was no significant increase in flexion in their knees. Six weeks to one year after TKR, the mean change was 3.1 degrees (paired t-test, p = 0.23, CI -8.1 to +2).  (+info)

(5/3746) Hyperhomocyst(e)inaemia in children with chronic renal failure.

BACKGROUND: Hyperhomocyst(e)inaemia has been identified as a significant risk factor for the occurrence of atherosclerosis in adults with chronic renal failure. Because of its presumed direct toxic effect on the vascular wall, long-standing hyperhomocyst(e)inaemia in children with chronic renal failure might have an important influence on their risk of future development of atherosclerosis. Hitherto no data on hyperhomocyst(e)inaemia in children with renal failure have been published. METHODS: We investigated 16 children with chronic renal failure on conservative management, 12 children on haemodialysis and 17 children with a renal transplant. Age-matched controls were used for comparison. Plasma homocyst(e)ine levels after an overnight fast were determined by HPLC. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated by the Schwartz formula. RESULTS: Mean plasma homocyst(e)ine levels were 12.6 +/- 5.2 micromol/l in the conservatively managed group, 22.2 +/- 13.5 micromol/l in the haemodialysed group, 14.2 +/- 2.1 micromol/l in transplanted children with an estimated GFR > 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 and 17.5 +/- 5.1 micromol/l in transplanted children with a lower estimated GFR. In all groups homocyst(e)ine levels were significantly elevated as compared to controls. Homocyst(e)ine levels were significantly correlated with age and negatively correlated with estimated GFR and serum folate levels. CONCLUSIONS: Hyperhomocyst(e)inaemia is a feature of chronic renal failure in children as well as in adults. Elevated homocyst(e)ine levels can already be demonstrated in children with renal failure before end-stage renal disease has developed and persist after renal transplantation. Whether treatment of hyperhomocyst(e)inaemia in children with renal failure decreases the risk for future atherosclerosis remains to be proven.  (+info)

(6/3746) Immediate and early renal function after living donor transplantation.

BACKGROUND: In order to assess the immediate renal function after living donor transplantation, renal function was compared in eight renal allograft recipients and their living related kidney donors during the first 24 h after transplantation. METHODS: Substantial and comparable intraoperative volume loading with Ringer's acetate and mannitol was performed together with the administration of frusemide. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) were estimated by the clearances of inulin and p-aminohippurane, respectively. Tubular reabsorptive function and injury were estimated from the clearance of lithium, the fractional excretion of sodium and the urinary excretion of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase. RESULTS: One hour after completion of surgery, GFR (54 +/- 7 ml/min) and ERPF (294 +/- 35 ml/min) were only 30% lower in the grafts than in the remaining donor kidneys, increasing to similar levels within 3 h. Only minor tubular dysfunction and injury were revealed in the grafted kidneys, and these tended to normalize within 24 h. CONCLUSIONS: By the present transplantation procedure comprising short ischaemia time and substantial volume expansion combined with mannitol and frusemide administration, kidneys from living donors regain nearly normal function within a few hours after transplantation.  (+info)

(7/3746) Leptin in CAPD patients: serum concentrations and peritoneal loss.

BACKGROUND: To determine whether serum leptin concentrations in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) are influenced by peritoneal loss of leptin and to compare serum leptin levels of normal subjects with those of patients receiving renal replacement therapy such as haemodialysis (HD), CAPD, or kidney transplantation. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Eighty-four individuals were investigated: six females and 14 males on standard CAPD; 13 females and 13 males on chronic HD; 10 female and eight male kidney transplant recipients, and 10 female and 10 male subjects as controls. Morning serum, 8-h and 24-h samples of peritoneal fluid concentrated to 6-20-fold by Centricon 3 (cutoff 3000 daltons), and 24-h urinary concentrations of leptin were measured with commercial RIA (Linco Research, Inc., USA). Venous blood and peritoneal fluid samples of albumin, beta2-microglobulin, glucose, urea, and creatinine were determined by standard laboratory techniques. Serum insulin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: Patients (men and women) on CAPD and after kidney transplantation exhibited significantly higher serum concentrations of leptin and leptin/BMI ratios than control subjects. These increased values did not reach statistical significance in HD patients. Serum leptin concentrations were correlated very significantly with BMI in all cases (r=0.380, P<0.001). Moreover, in CAPD patients (r=0.630, P<0.007) and in HD patients (r=0.668, P<0.005), but not in kidney transplant recipients or control subjects, significant correlations were observed between serum leptin and insulin concentrations. Residual renal function (RRF) in the range 0-12.8 ml/min and serum beta2-microglobulin levels in the range 7.9-47.1 mg/l did not influence serum leptin levels in CAPD and HD patients. As expected, leptin was detected in the peritoneal fluid of CAPD patients. Twenty-four-hour peritoneal loss (30.95+/-21.05 ng/min) and 24-h peritoneal clearance (0.01+/-0.01 ml/kg/min) of leptin account for only 3.9% of estimated whole-body leptin production rate and 0.7% of leptin clearance from plasma respectively. Twenty-four-hour urinary losses of leptin in CAPD patients were negligible, accounting for 5.6+/-1.8% (range 0.3-15.2%) of total (peritoneal and urinary) loss of this hormone. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that serum leptin levels are not affected by continuous peritoneal loss of leptin during CAPD and that insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia contribute to elevated serum leptin concentrations in CAPD and HD patients. The aetiology of increased serum leptin levels in kidney transplant recipients is probably different from that in dialysis patients.  (+info)

(8/3746) Erythromycin enhances early postoperative contractility of the denervated whole stomach as an esophageal substitute.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether early postoperative administration of erythromycin accelerates the spontaneous motor recovery process after elevation of the denervated whole stomach up to the neck. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Spontaneous motor recovery after gastric denervation is a slow process that progressively takes place over years. METHODS: Erythromycin was administered as follows: continuous intravenous (i.v.) perfusion until postoperative day 10 in ten whole stomach (WS) patients at a dose of either 1 g (n = 5) or 2 g (n = 5) per day; oral intake at a dose of 1 g/day during 1.5 to 8 months after surgery in 11 WS patients, followed in 7 of them by discontinuation of the drug during 2 to 4 weeks. Gastric motility was assessed with intraluminal perfused catheters in these 21 patients, in 23 WS patients not receiving erythromycin, and in 11 healthy volunteers. A motility index was established by dividing the sum of the areas under the curves of >9 mmHg contractions by the time of recording. RESULTS: The motility index after IV or oral administration of erythromycin at and after surgery was significantly higher than that without erythromycin (i.v., 1 g: p = 0.0090; i.v., 2 g: p = 0.0090; oral, 1 g: p = 0.0017). It was similar to that in healthy volunteers (i.v., 1 g: p = 0.2818; oral, 1 g: p = 0.7179) and to that in WS patients with >3 years of follow-up who never received erythromycin (i.v., 1 g: p = 0.2206; oral, 1 g: p = 0.8326). The motility index after discontinuation of the drug was similar or superior to that recorded under medication in four patients who did not experience any modification of their alimentary comfort, whereas it dropped dramatically parallel to deterioration of the alimentary comfort in three patients. CONCLUSIONS: Early postoperative contractility of the denervated whole stomach pulled up to the neck under either i.v. or oral erythromycin is similar to that recovered spontaneously beyond 3 years of follow-up. In some patients, this booster effect persists after discontinuation of the drug.  (+info)