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(1/4580) Hyper-IgE syndrome with recurrent infections--an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder.

BACKGROUND: The hyper-IgE syndrome with recurrent infections is a rare immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent skin and pulmonary abscesses and extremely elevated levels of IgE in serum. Associated facial and skeletal features have been recognized, but their frequency is unknown, and the genetic basis of the hyper-IgE syndrome is poorly understood. METHODS: We studied 30 patients with the hyper-IgE syndrome and 70 of their relatives. We took histories, reviewed records, performed physical and dental examinations, took anthropometric measurements, and conducted laboratory studies. RESULTS: Nonimmunologic features of the hyper-IgE syndrome were present in all patients older than eight years. Seventy-two percent had the previously unrecognized feature of failure or delay of shedding of the primary teeth owing to lack of root resorption. Common findings among patients were recurrent fractures (in 57 percent of patients), hyperextensible joints (in 68 percent), and scoliosis (in 76 percent of patients 16 years of age or older). The classic triad of abscesses, pneumonia, and an elevated IgE level was identified in 77 percent of all patients and in 85 percent of those older than eight. In 6 of 23 adults (26 percent), IgE levels declined over time and came closer to or fell within the normal range. Autosomal dominant transmission of the hyper-IgE syndrome was found, but with variable expressivity. Of the 27 relatives at risk for inheriting the hyper-IgE syndrome, 10 were fully affected, 11 were unaffected, and 6 had combinations of mild immunologic, dental, and skeletal features of the hyper-IgE syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: The hyper-IgE syndrome is a multisystem disorder that affects the dentition, the skeleton, connective tissue, and the immune system. It is inherited as a single-locus autosomal dominant trait with variable expressivity.  (+info)

(2/4580) Variants of a Cryptococcus neoformans strain elicit different inflammatory responses in mice.

The virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans isolates with high and low extracellular proteolytic activity was investigated in mice. No consistent relationship between proteolytic activity and virulence was observed, but isolates derived from one strain were shown to elicit different inflammatory responses.  (+info)

(3/4580) Expression of heat shock protein 72 by alveolar macrophages in hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

The current study was done to look at a possible role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). The specific aims were to determine whether there was a difference in the expression of HSP72 in alveolar macrophages (AMs) between mice challenged with HP antigen and saline-treated control mice and between AMs obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from 18 patients with HP and 11 normal subjects. The expression of HSP72 was studied under basal conditions and under a mild heat shock. HSP72 expression by AMs in response to in vitro stimulation with Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula was lower in AMs of control mice than in those of HP animals. HSP72 was constitutively expressed in AMs of both normal and HP subjects. Densitometric ratios showed that AMs from normal subjects responded to heat shock with a 39 degrees C-to-37 degrees C ratio of 1.72 +/- 0.18 (mean +/- SE), and AMs from HP patients responded with a ratio of 1.16 +/- 0.16 (P = 0.0377). This decreased induction by additional stress of AMs could lead to an altered immunoregulatory activity and account for the inflammation seen in HP.  (+info)

(4/4580) Pneumonia in febrile neutropenic patients and in bone marrow and blood stem-cell transplant recipients: use of high-resolution computed tomography.

PURPOSE: To obtain statistical data on the use of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for early detection of pneumonia in febrile neutropenic patients with unknown focus of infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred eighty-eight HRCT studies were performed prospectively in 112 neutropenic patients with fever of unknown origin persisting for more than 48 hours despite empiric antibiotic treatment. Fifty-four of these studies were performed in transplant recipients. All patients had normal chest roentgenograms. If pneumonia was detected by HRCT, guided bronchoalveolar lavage was recommended. Evidence of pneumonia on chest roentgenograms during follow-up and micro-organisms detected during follow-up were regarded as documentation of pneumonia. RESULTS: Of the 188 HRCT studies, 112 (60%) showed pneumonia and 76 were normal. Documentation of pneumonia was possible in 61 cases by chest roentgenography or micro-organism detection (54%) (P < 10(-6)). Sensitivity of HRCT was 87% (88% in transplant recipients), specificity was 57% (67%), and the negative predictive value was 88% (97%). A time gain of 5 days was achieved by the additional use of HRCT compared to an exclusive use of chest roentgenography. CONCLUSION: The high frequency of inflammatory pulmonary disease after a suspicious HRCT scan (> 50%) proves that pneumonia is not excluded by a normal chest roentgenogram. Given the significantly longer duration of febrile episodes in transplant recipients, HRCT findings are particularly relevant in this subgroup. Patients with normal HRCT scans, particularly transplant recipients, have a low risk of pneumonia during follow-up. All neutropenic patients with fever of unknown origin and normal chest roentgenograms should undergo HRCT.  (+info)

(5/4580) Blastomycosis acquired occupationally during prairie dog relocation--Colorado, 1998.

On August 31, 1998, two suspected cases of fungal pneumonia were reported to the Boulder County (Colorado) Health Department (BCHD). Both patients were immunocompetent, otherwise healthy adults working for the City of Boulder Open Space (CBOS) program on a prairie dog relocation project. This report summarizes the epidemiologic investigation by BCHD, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and CDC; the findings indicate that these two persons acquired blastomycosis in Colorado, which is outside the area where the disease is endemic.  (+info)

(6/4580) Pulmonary expression of interleukin-13 causes inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, subepithelial fibrosis, physiologic abnormalities, and eotaxin production.

Interleukin (IL)-13 is a pleiotropic cytokine produced in large quantities by activated CD4(+) Th2 lymphocytes. To define further its potential in vivo effector functions, the Clara cell 10-kDa protein promoter was used to express IL-13 selectively in the lung, and the phenotype of the resulting transgenic mice was characterized. In contrast to transgene-negative littermates, the lungs of transgene-positive mice contained an inflammatory response around small and large airways and in the surrounding parenchyma. It was mononuclear in nature and contained significant numbers of eosinophils and enlarged and occasionally multinucleated macrophages. Airway epithelial cell hypertrophy, mucus cell metaplasia, the hyperproduction of neutral and acidic mucus, the deposition of Charcot-Leyden-like crystals, and subepithelial airway fibrosis were also prominently noted. Eotaxin protein and mRNA were also present in large quantities in the lungs of the transgene-positive, but not the transgene-negative, mice. IL-4, IL-5, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-5 were not similarly detected. Physiological evaluations revealed significant increases in baseline airways resistance and airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine in transgene-positive animals. Thus, the targeted pulmonary expression of IL-13 causes a mononuclear and eosinophilic inflammatory response, mucus cell metaplasia, the deposition of Charcot-Leyden-like crystals, airway fibrosis, eotaxin production, airways obstruction, and nonspecific AHR. IL-13 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of similar responses in asthma or other Th2-polarized tissue responses.  (+info)

(7/4580) Bone marrow-derived cells are required for the induction of a pulmonary inflammatory response mediated by CD40 ligation.

The expression of inflammatory mediators by various cells following in vitro CD40 ligation is well known. However, knowledge of the role and interaction with these cells in the establishment and maintenance of in vivo immune-mediated inflammation is limited. In this report, a chimeric mouse model based on CD40 knockout and wild-type mice was used to assess the role of bone marrow (BM)-derived and non-BM-derived cells in a CD40-mediated pulmonary inflammation response. CD40+ BM-derived cells were required for initial cell recruitment, pulmonary edema, and weight loss associated with this response. The structural CD40+ non-BM-derived cells of the lung, such as fibroblasts, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells, could not by themselves establish any level of pulmonary inflammation. However, both the CD40+ BM-derived cells and the structural CD40+ non-BM-derived cells of the lung were required to maximize the level of pulmonary inflammation. Both B cells and T cells played a contributing role in macrophage recruitment and pulmonary edema but neither contributed to the inflammation-associated weight loss. These experiments indicate that CD40+ BM-derived cells were critical to the induction of pulmonary inflammation and that alveolar macrophages, B cells, and T cells contributed to selective aspects of the response.  (+info)

(8/4580) Long-term morbidity and mortality following hypoxaemic lower respiratory tract infection in Gambian children.

Acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) are the main cause of death in young children worldwide. We report here the results of a study to determine the long-term survival of children admitted to hospital with severe pneumonia. The study was conducted on 190 Gambian children admitted to hospital in 1992-94 for ALRI who survived to discharge. Of these, 83 children were hypoxaemic and were treated with oxygen, and 107 were not. On follow-up in 1996-97, 62% were traced. Of the children with hypoxaemia, 8 had died, compared with 4 of those without. The mortality rates were 4.8 and, 2.2 deaths per 100 child-years of follow-up for hypoxaemic and non-hypoxaemic children, respectively (P = 0.2). Mortality was higher for children who had been malnourished (Z-score < -2) when seen in hospital (rate ratio = 3.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-10.29; P = 0.045). Children with younger siblings experienced less frequent subsequent respiratory infections (rate ratio for further hospitalization with respiratory illness = 0.15; 95% CI = 0.04-0.50; P = 0.002). Children in Gambia who survive hospital admission with hypoxaemic pneumonia have a good prognosis. Survival depends more on nutritional status than on having been hypoxaemic. Investment in oxygen therapy appears justified, and efforts should be made to improve nutrition in malnourished children with pneumonia.  (+info)