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(1/735) Legalized physician-assisted suicide in Oregon--the first year's experience.

BACKGROUND AND METHODS: On October 27, 1997, Oregon legalized physician-assisted suicide. We collected data on all terminally ill Oregon residents who received prescriptions for lethal medications under the Oregon Death with Dignity Act and who died in 1998. The data were obtained from physicians' reports, death certificates, and interviews with physicians. We compared persons who took lethal medications prescribed under the act with those who died from similar illnesses but did not receive prescriptions for lethal medications. RESULTS: Information on 23 persons who received prescriptions for lethal medications was reported to the Oregon Health Division; 15 died after taking the lethal medications, 6 died from underlying illnesses, and 2 were alive as of January 1, 1999. The median age of the 15 patients who died after taking lethal medications was 69 years; 8 were male, and all 15 were white. Thirteen of the 15 patients had cancer. The case patients and controls were similar with regard to sex, race, urban or rural residence, level of education, health insurance coverage, and hospice enrollment. No case patients or controls expressed concern about the financial impact of their illness. One case patient and 15 controls expressed concern about inadequate control of pain (P=0.10). The case patients were more likely than the controls to have never married (P=0.04) and were more likely to be concerned about loss of autonomy due to illness (P=0.01) and loss of control of bodily functions (P=0.02). At death, 21 percent of the case patients and 84 percent of the controls were completely disabled (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: During the first year of legalized physician-assisted suicide in Oregon, the decision to request and use a prescription for lethal medication was associated with concern about loss of autonomy or control of bodily functions, not with fear of intractable pain or concern about financial loss. In addition, we found that the choice of physician-assisted suicide was not associated with level of education or health insurance coverage.  (+info)

(2/735) Decline in cigarette consumption following implementation of a comprehensive tobacco prevention and education program--Oregon, 1996-1998.

In November 1996, residents of Oregon approved a ballot measure increasing the cigarette tax by 30 cents (to 68 cents per pack). The measure stipulated that 10% of the additional tax revenue be allocated to the Oregon Health Division (OHD) to develop and implement a tobacco-use prevention program. In 1997, OHD created Oregon's Tobacco Prevention and Education Program (TPEP), a comprehensive, community-based program modeled on the successful tobacco-use prevention programs in California and Massachusetts. To assess the effects of the tax increase and TPEP in Oregon, OHD evaluated data on the number of packs of cigarettes taxed before (1993-1996) and after (1997-1998) the ballot initiative and implementation of the program. Oregon's results also were compared with national data. This report summarizes the results of the analysis, which indicate that consumption of cigarettes in Oregon declined substantially after implementation of the excise tax and TPEP and exceeded the national rate of decline.  (+info)

(3/735) Improving clinician acceptance and use of computerized documentation of coded diagnosis.

After the Northwest Division of Kaiser Permanente implemented EpicCare, a comprehensive electronic medical record, clinicians were required to directly document orders and diagnoses on this computerized system, a task they found difficult and time consuming. We analyzed the sources of this problem to improve the process and increase its acceptance by clinicians. One problem was the use of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) as our coding scheme, even though ICD-9 is not a complete nomenclature of diseases and using it as such creates difficulties. In addition, the synonym list we used had some inaccurate associations, contributing to clinician frustration. Furthermore, the initial software program contained no adequate mechanism for adding qualifying comments or preferred terminology. We sought to address all these issues. Strategies included adjusting the available coding choices and descriptions and modifying the medical record software. In addition, the software vendor developed a utility that allows clinicians to replace the ICD-9 description with their own preferred terminology while preserving the ICD-9 code. We present an evaluation of this utility.  (+info)

(4/735) Evaluating the sale of a nonprofit health system to a for-profit hospital management company: the Legacy Experience.

OBJECTIVE: To introduce and develop a decision model that can be used by the leadership of nonprofit healthcare organizations to assist them in evaluating whether selling to a for-profit organization is in their community's best interest. STUDY SETTING/DATA SOURCES: A case study of the planning process and decision model that Legacy Health System used to evaluate whether to sell to a for-profit hospital management company and use the proceeds of the sale to establish a community health foundation. Data sources included financial statements of benchmark organizations, internal company records, and numerous existing studies. STUDY DESIGN: The development of the multivariate model was based on insight gathered through a review of the current literature regarding the conversion of nonprofit healthcare organizations. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: The effect that conversion from nonprofit to for-profit status would have on each variable was estimated based on assumptions drawn from the current literature and on an analysis of Legacy and for-profit hospital company data. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results of the decision model calculations indicate that the sale of Legacy to a for-profit firm and the subsequent creation of a community foundation would have a negative effect on the local community. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the decision model enabled senior management and trustees to systematically address the conversion question and to conclude that continuing to operate as a nonprofit organization would provide the most benefit to the local community. The model will prove useful to organizations that decide to sell to a for-profit organization as well as those that choose to continue nonprofit operations. For those that decide to sell, the model will assist in minimizing any potential negative effect that conversion may have on the community. The model will help those who choose not to sell to develop a better understanding of the organization's value to the community.  (+info)

(5/735) Phylogenetic analysis of particle-attached and free-living bacterial communities in the Columbia river, its estuary, and the adjacent coastal ocean.

The Columbia River estuary is a dynamic system in which estuarine turbidity maxima trap and extend the residence time of particles and particle-attached bacteria over those of the water and free-living bacteria. Particle-attached bacteria dominate bacterial activity in the estuary and are an important part of the estuarine food web. PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes from particle-attached and free-living bacteria in the Columbia River, its estuary, and the adjacent coastal ocean were cloned, and 239 partial sequences were determined. A wide diversity was observed at the species level within at least six different bacterial phyla, including most subphyla of the class Proteobacteria. In the estuary, most particle-attached bacterial clones (75%) were related to members of the genus Cytophaga or of the alpha, gamma, or delta subclass of the class Proteobacteria. These same clones, however, were rare in or absent from either the particle-attached or the free-living bacterial communities of the river and the coastal ocean. In contrast, about half (48%) of the free-living estuarine bacterial clones were similar to clones from the river or the coastal ocean. These free-living bacteria were related to groups of cosmopolitan freshwater bacteria (beta-proteobacteria, gram-positive bacteria, and Verrucomicrobium spp.) and groups of marine organisms (gram-positive bacteria and alpha-proteobacteria [SAR11 and Rhodobacter spp.]). These results suggest that rapidly growing particle-attached bacteria develop into a uniquely adapted estuarine community and that free-living estuarine bacteria are similar to members of the river and the coastal ocean microbial communities. The high degree of diversity in the estuary is the result of the mixing of bacterial communities from the river, estuary, and coastal ocean.  (+info)

(6/735) Type 2 diabetes: incremental medical care costs during the first 8 years after diagnosis.

OBJECTIVE: To describe and analyze the time course of medical care costs caused by type 2 diabetes, from the time of diagnosis through the first 8 postdiagnostic years. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: From electronic health maintenance organization (HMO) records, we ascertained the ongoing medical care costs for all members with type 2 diabetes who were newly diagnosed between 1988 and 1995. To isolate incremental costs (costs caused by the diagnosis of diabetes), we subtracted the costs of individually matched HMO members without diabetes from costs of members with diabetes. RESULTS: The economic burden of diabetes is immediately apparent from the time of diagnosis. In year 1, total medical costs were 2.1 times higher for patients with diabetes compared with those without diabetes. Diabetes-associated incremental costs (type 2 diabetic costs minus matched costs for people without diabetes) averaged $2,257 per type 2 diabetic patient per year during the first 8 postdiagnostic years. Annual incremental costs varied relatively little over the period but were higher during years 1, 7, and 8 because of higher-cost hospitalizations for causes other than diabetes or its complications. CONCLUSIONS: For the first 8 years after diabetes diagnosis, patients with type 2 diabetes incurred substantially higher costs than matched nondiabetic patients, but those high costs remained largely flat. Once the growth in costs due to general aging is controlled for, it appears that diabetic complications do not increase incremental costs as early as is commonly believed. Additional research is needed to better understand how diabetes and its diagnosis affect medical care costs over longer periods of time.  (+info)

(7/735) Neuronal vacuolation in raccoons from Oregon.

During a 2-year period (1995-1997), vacuoles were detected in neurons of 21/50 (42% prevalence) raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Oregon. Age or sex predisposition was not apparent. Twenty of these raccoons were from within a radius of 40 km of Corvallis in western Oregon. Microscopically, the vacuoles were variable in size, were in the perikarya, and were consistently present in pontine nuclei. Brain tissues were negative for rabies virus antigen by fluorescent antibody test and for the protease-resistant protein prion by immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopic examination of the brain stem of selected animals revealed accumulation of electron-dense material within neuronal perikarya. Light and electron microscopic examination indicated that the accumulated intracellular material had a high lipid content. These lesions suggest a form of neuronal storage condition. Further research is required to identify the composition of the intracellular lipid material, to elucidate the mechanism of neuronal vacuolation in raccoons, and to understand the basis for the apparent geographic restriction of this lesion.  (+info)

(8/735) Outbreak of Salmonella serotype Muenchen infections associated with unpasteurized orange juice--United States and Canada, June 1999.

During June 1999, Public Health-Seattle and King County (PHSKC) and the Washington state health department and the Oregon Health Division independently investigated clusters of diarrheal illness attributed to Salmonella serotype Muenchen infections in each state. Both clusters were associated with a commercially distributed unpasteurized orange juice traced to a single processor, which distributes widely in the United States. As of July 13, 207 confirmed cases associated with this outbreak have been reported by 15 states and two Canadian provinces; an additional 91 cases of S. Muenchen infection reported since June 1 are under investigation. This report summarizes the two state-based investigations and presents preliminary information about the outbreak in the other states and Canada.  (+info)