Loading...
(1/28523) A novel method for determining linkage between DNA sequences: hybridization to paired probe arrays.

Cooperative hybridization has been used to establish physical linkage between two loci on a DNA strand. Linkage was detected by hybridization to a new type of high-density oligonucleotide array. Each synthesis location on the array contains a mixture of two different probe sequences. Each of the two probes can hybridize independently to a different target sequence, but if the two target sequences are physically linked there is a cooperative increase in hybridization yield. The ability to create and control non-linear effects raises a host of possibilities for applications of oligonucleotide array hybridization. The method has been used to assign linkage in 50:50 mixtures of DNA containing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) separated by 17, 693, 1350 and 2038 bp and to reconstruct haplotypes. Other potential uses include increasing the specificity of hybridization in mutation detection and gene expression monitoring applications, determining SNP haplotypes, characterizing repetitive sequences, such as short tandem repeats, and aiding contig assembly in sequen-cing by hybridization.  (+info)

(2/28523) Smoothing of the thermal stability of DNA duplexes by using modified nucleosides and chaotropic agents.

The effect of alkyltrimethylammonium ions on the thermostability of natural and modified DNA duplexes has been investigated. We have shown that the use of tetramethylammonium ions TMA+along with the chemical modification of duplexes allow the fine adjustment of T m and the possibility of obtaining several duplex systems with varied isostabilizedtemperatures, some of which show greater stability than those of natural DNA. This approach could be very useful for DNA sequencing by hybridization.  (+info)

(3/28523) Combining SSH and cDNA microarrays for rapid identification of differentially expressed genes.

Comparing patterns of gene expression in cell lines and tissues has important applications in a variety of biological systems. In this study we have examined whether the emerging technology of cDNA microarrays will allow a high throughput analysis of expression of cDNA clones generated by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). A set of cDNA clones including 332 SSH inserts amplified by PCR was arrayed using robotic printing. The cDNA arrays were hybridized with fluorescent labeled probes prepared from RNA from ER-positive (MCF7 and T47D) and ER-negative (MDA-MB-231 and HBL-100) breast cancer cell lines. Ten clones were identified that were over-expressed by at least a factor of five in the ER-positive cell lines. Northern blot analysis confirmed over-expression of these 10 cDNAs. Sequence analysis identified four of these clones as cytokeratin 19, GATA-3, CD24 and glutathione-S-transferase mu-3. Of the remaining six cDNA clones, four clones matched EST sequences from two different genes and two clones were novel sequences. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence confirmed that CD24 protein was over-expressed in the ER-positive cell lines. We conclude that SSH and microarray technology can be successfully applied to identify differentially expressed genes. This approach allowed the identification of differentially expressed genes without the need to obtain previously cloned cDNAs.  (+info)

(4/28523) Identification of the genes responsive to etoposide-induced apoptosis: application of DNA chip technology.

DNA chip technology was used in an attempt to identify target genes responsible for apoptosis induced by etoposide, a p53 activating topoisomerase II inhibitor used clinically as an antitumor agent. 62 Individual mRNAs whose mass changed significantly were identified after screening oligonucleotide arrays capable of detecting 6591 unique human mRNA species. 12 (Nine induced and three repressed) of the etoposide-responsive genes were further studied by Northern analysis and an agreement rate of 92%, was reached. Among the 12 genes studied, two (WAF1/p21 and PCNA) are known p53 regulatory genes, two (glutathione peroxidase and S100A2 calcium-binding protein) appear to be the novel p53 target genes and the others appear to be p53-independent. Based upon these findings, the signalling pathways that possibly mediate etoposide-induced apoptosis are proposed.  (+info)

(5/28523) Development of an oligonucleotide-specific capture plate hybridization assay for detection of Haemophilus parasuis.

An oligonucleotide-specific capture plate hybridization assay has been developed to rapidly, specifically, and sensitively detect Haemophilus parasuis from nasal swabs. Several in vitro studies have been performed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the test, and in vivo studies have validated this technique in pigs. Results suggest that the assay detects <100 colony-forming units/ml in a pure culture and gives a positive result when H. parasuis is present in a ratio of 1:10(3)-10(4) in a mixed culture, and the probe does not hybridize with other related species found in the upper respiratory tract. This assay is more sensitive than culture for detection of the microorganism from nasal swabs and lesions.  (+info)

(6/28523) Versatile derivatisation of solid support media for covalent bonding on DNA-microchips.

A chemistry was developed that permits on DNA-arrays both the covalent immobilisation of pre-fabricated nucleic acids-such as oligonucleotides, PCR-products or peptide nucleic acid oligomers-and the in situ synthesis of such compounds on either glass or polypropylene surfaces. Bonding was found to be stable even after some 30 cycles of stripping. Due to a dendrimeric structure of the linker molecule, the loading can be modified in a controlled manner and increased beyond the capacity of glass without negative effects on hybridisation efficiency. Also, the chemistry warrants the modulation of other surface properties such as charge or hydrophobicity. Preferentially, attachment of nucleic acids takes place only via the terminal amino-group of amino-modified oligonucleotides or the terminal hydroxyl-group of unmodified molecules so that the entire molecule is accessible to probe hybridisation. This derivatisation represents a support chemistry versatile enough to serve nearly all current forms of DNA-arrays or microchips.  (+info)

(7/28523) Timely toxicology.

The ToxChip, a DNA microarray chip, allows the monitoring of the expression levels of thousands of different genes at a time, thereby condensing months of painstaking laboratory tasks into a day's work. For toxicology researchers in particular, this tool is important because it promises a more effective way to identify environmental hazards and their effects on DNA. The ToxChip, developed by NIEHS scientists J. Carl Barrett, Cynthia Afshari, and Emile F. Nuwaysir, could transform the way toxicologists approach environmental problems.  (+info)

(8/28523) DNA microarray technology: the anticipated impact on the study of human disease.

One can imagine that, one day, there will be a general requirement that relevant array data be deposited, at the time of publication of manuscripts in which they are described, into a single site made available for the storage and analysis of array data (modeled after the GenBank submission requirements for DNA sequence information). With this system in place, one can anticipate a time when data from thousands of gene expression experiments will be available for meta-analysis, which has the potential to balance out artifacts from many individual studies, thus leading to more robust results and subtle conclusions. This will require that data adhere to some type of uniform structure and format that would ideally be independent of the particular expression technology used to generate it. The pros and cons of various publication modalities for these large electronic data sets have been discussed elsewhere [12], but, practical difficulties aside, general depositing must occur for this technology to reach the broadest range of investigators. Finally, as mentioned at the beginning of this review, it is unfortunate that this important research tool remains largely restricted to a few laboratories that have developed expertise in this area and to a growing number of commercial interests. Ultimately the real value of microarray technology will only be realized when this approach is generally available. It is hoped that issues including platforms, instrumentation, clone availability, and patents [20] will be resolved shortly, making this technology accessible to the broadest range of scientists at the earliest possible moment.  (+info)