The amino acid sequence of Neurospora NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. The tryptic peptides. (1/1876)

The NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa was digested with trypsin, and peptides accounting for 441 out of the 452 residues of the polypeptide chain were isolated and substantially sequenced. Additional experimental detail has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50052 (11 pages) with the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, W. Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained under the terms given in Biochem J. (1975) 145, 5.  (+info)

The amino acid sequence of Neurospora NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. Peptides from digestion with a staphylococcal proteinase. (2/1876)

The extracellular proteinase of Staphylococcus aureus strain V8 was used to digest the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa. Of 35 non-overlapping peptides expected from the glutamate content of the polypeptide chain, 29 were isolated and substantially sequenced. The sequences obtained were valuable in providing overlaps for the alignment of about two-thirds of the sequences found in tryptic peptides [Wootton, J. C., Taylor, J, G., Jackson, A. A., Chambers, G. K. & Fincham, J. R. S. (1975) Biochem. J. 149, 739-748]. The blocked N-terminal peptide of the protein was isolated. This peptide was sequenced by mass spectrometry, and found to have N-terminal N-acetylserine by Howard R. Morris and Anne Dell, whose results are presented as an Appendix to the main paper. The staphylococcal proteinase showed very high specificity for glutamyl bonds in the NH4HCO3 buffer used. Partial splits of two aspartyl bonds, both Asp-Ile, were probably attributable to the proteinase. No cleavage of glutaminyl or S-carboxymethylcysteinyl bonds was found. Additional experimental detail has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50053 (5 pages) with the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, W. Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K, from whom copies may be obtained under the terms given in Biochem. J. (1975) 1458 5.  (+info)

The amino acid sequence of Neurospora NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. Peptic and chymotryptic peptides and the complete sequence. (3/1876)

Peptic and chymotryptic peptides were isolated form the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa and substantially sequenced. Out of 452 residues in the polypeptide chain, 265 were recovered in the peptic and 427 in the chymotryptic peptides. Together with the tryptic peptides [Wootton, J. C., Taylor, J. G., Jackson, A. A., Chambers, G. K. & Fincham, J. R. S. (1975) Biochem. J. 149, 749-755], these establish the complete sequence of the chain, including the acid and amide assignments, except for seven places where overlaps are inadequate. These remaining alignments are deduced from information on the CNBr fragments obtained in another laboratory [Blumenthal, K. M., Moon, K. & Smith, E. L. (1975), J. Biol. Chem. 250, 3644-3654]. Further information has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50054 (17 pages) with the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, W. Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained under the terms given in Biochem. J. (1975) 145, 5.  (+info)

Uncoupling of transfer of the presequence and unfolding of the mature domain in precursor translocation across the mitochondrial outer membrane. (4/1876)

Translocation of mitochondrial precursor proteins across the mitochondrial outer membrane is facilitated by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex. By using site-specific photocrosslinking, we have mapped interactions between TOM proteins and a mitochondrial precursor protein arrested at two distinct stages, stage A (accumulated at 0 degrees C) and stage B (accumulated at 30 degrees C), in the translocation across the outer membrane at high resolution not achieved previously. Although the stage A and stage B intermediates were assigned previously to the forms bound to the cis site and the trans site of the TOM complex, respectively, the results of crosslinking indicate that the presequence of the intermediates at both stage A and stage B is already on the trans side of the outer membrane. The mature domain is unfolded and bound to Tom40 at stage B whereas it remains folded at stage A. After dissociation from the TOM complex, translocation of the stage B intermediate, but not of the stage A intermediate, across the inner membrane was promoted by the intermembrane-space domain of Tom22. We propose a new model for protein translocation across the outer membrane, where translocation of the presequence and unfolding of the mature domain are not necessarily coupled.  (+info)

Characterisation of the last Fe-S cluster-binding subunit of Neurospora crassa complex I. (5/1876)

We have cloned cDNAs encoding the last iron-sulphur protein of complex I from Neurospora crassa. The cDNA sequence contains an open reading frame that codes for a precursor polypeptide of 226 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 24972 Da. Our results indicate that the mature protein belongs probably to the peripheral arm of complex I and is rather unstable when not assembled into the enzyme. The protein is highly homologous to the PSST subunit of bovine complex I, the most likely candidate to bind iron-sulphur cluster N-2. All the amino acid residues proposed to bind such a cluster are conserved in the fungal protein.  (+info)

Transport of the ADP/ATP carrier of mitochondria from the TOM complex to the TIM22.54 complex. (6/1876)

Members of the mitochondrial carrier family such as the ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) are composed of three structurally related modules. Here we show that each of the modules contains a mitochondrial import signal recognized by Tim10 and Tim12 in the intermembrane space. The first and the second module are translocated across the outer membrane independently of the membrane potential, DeltaDeltapsipsi, but they are not inserted into the inner membrane. The third module interacts tightly with the TOM complex and thereby prevents complete translocation of the precursor across the outer membrane. At this stage, binding of a TIM9.10 complex confers a topology to the translocation intermediate which reflects the modular structure of the AAC. The precursor is then transferred to the TIM9.10.12 complex, still interacting with the TOM complex. Release of the precursor from the TOM complex and insertion into the inner membrane by the TIM22.54 complex requires a DeltaDeltapsipsi-responsive signal in the third module.  (+info)

Evidence for negative interference: clustering of crossovers close to the am locus in Neurospora crassa among am recombinants. (7/1876)

In response to a conflict between two mapping studies in the predicted orientation of the allele map with respect to the centromere, Fincham proposed that recombination events at the Neurospora am locus rarely have an associated crossover. Fincham considered that the elevated levels of crossing over between flanking markers in am recombinants resulted from negative interference, an increased probability of a nearby second event, and on this basis predicted a clustering of crossing over near am in these recombinants. In this article we reevaluate the data from three mapping studies of the am locus and report molecular evidence that shows crossovers to be clustered immediately proximal to am in am recombinants.  (+info)

N-terminal tail export from the mitochondrial matrix. Adherence to the prokaryotic "positive-inside" rule of membrane protein topology. (8/1876)

Export of N-terminal tails of mitochondrial inner membrane proteins from the mitochondrial matrix is a membrane potential-dependent process, mediated by the Oxa1p translocation machinery. The hydrophilic segments of these membrane proteins, which undergo export, display a characteristic charge profile where intermembrane space-localized segments bear a net negative charge, whereas those remaining in the matrix have a net positive one. Using a model protein, preSu9(1-112)-dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), which undergoes Oxa1p-mediated N-tail export, we demonstrate here that the net charge of N- and C-flanking regions of the transmembrane domain play a critical role in determining the orientation of the insertion process. The N-tail must bear a net negative charge to be exported to the intermembrane space. Furthermore, a net positive charge of the C-terminal region supports this N-tail export event. These data provide experimental evidence that protein export in mitochondria adheres to the "positive-inside" rule, described for sec-independent sorting of membrane proteins in prokaryotes. We propose here that the importance of a charge profile reflects a need for specific protein-protein interactions to occur in the export reaction, presumably at the level of the Oxa1p export machinery.  (+info)