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(1/9994) Tumour ablation and hepatic decompensation rates in multi-agent chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma.

Thirty-seven cirrhotic patients with 62 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) foci--most Child-Pugh class B or C and/or with large, inoperable tumours--underwent 148 sessions of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) using lipiodol, doxorubicin and cisplatin. Treatment efficacy was assessed by serial hepatic arteriography in 34/37 (91.9%) patients and abdominal CT scanning in 3/37 (8.1%) patients. Child-Pugh status was determined prior to each treatment session. Varying degrees of control of tumour neovascularity occurred for a median 390 days (range 90 to > 1680 days) in 33/34 (97.1%) patients in whom progress hepatic arteriography was performed. Ablation of tumour neovascularity occurred in 6/6 (100%), 4/12 (33.3%) and 6/16 (37.5%) patients with HCC diameters < 4 cm, 4-7 cm and > 8 cm, respectively (p < 0.02). Significantly more sessions were required for ablation of larger tumours (p < 0.05). Recurrent HCC was detected in 50% of patients after a median 240 days (range 60-1120 days). Deterioration in Child-Pugh status followed a session of TACE on 19/148 (12.8%) occasions but resulted in unscheduled hospitalization on only 4/148 (2.7%) occasions, the highest incidence (8.3%) in Child-Pugh C patients. Actuarial survival was 27/36 (75.0%) at 6 months, 17/34 (50.0%) at 12 months, 14/34 (41.2%) at 18 months, 9/31 (29.0%) at 24 months and 4/27 (14.8%) at 36 months. Multi-agent TACE with lipiodol, doxorubicin and cisplatin provides a useful anti-tumour effect, even in cirrhotic patients with large HCCs. The incidence of clinically significant deterioration in hepatic function due to ischaemia of non-tumorous liver is acceptably low, even in Child-Pugh C patients.  (+info)

(2/9994) Bone marrow angiogenesis and mast cell density increase simultaneously with progression of human multiple myeloma.

Immunohistochemical, cytochemical and ultrastructural data showing vivid angiogenesis and numerous mast cells (MCs) in the bone marrow of 24 patients with active multiple myeloma (MM) compared with 34 patients with non-active MM and 22 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) led us to hypothesize that angiogenesis parallels progression of MM, and that MCs participate in its induction via angiogenic factors in their secretory granules.  (+info)

(3/9994) Quantification of tumour vasculature and hypoxia by immunohistochemical staining and HbO2 saturation measurements.

Despite the possibility that tumour hypoxia may limit radiotherapeutic response, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. A new methodology has been developed in which information from several sophisticated techniques is combined and analysed at a microregional level. First, tumour oxygen availability is spatially defined by measuring intravascular blood oxygen saturations (HbO2) cryospectrophotometrically in frozen tumour blocks. Second, hypoxic development is quantified in adjacent sections using immunohistochemical detection of a fluorescently conjugated monoclonal antibody (ELK3-51) to a nitroheterocyclic hypoxia marker (EF5), thereby providing information relating to both the oxygen consumption rates and the effective oxygen diffusion distances. Third, a combination of fluorescent (Hoechst 33342 or DiOC7(3)) and immunohistological (PECAM-1/CD31) stains is used to define the anatomical vascular densities and the fraction of blood vessels containing flow. Using a computer-interfaced microscope stage, image analysis software and a 3-CCD colour video camera, multiple images are digitized, combined to form a photo-montage and revisited after each of the three staining protocols. By applying image registration techniques, the spatial distribution of HbO2 saturations is matched to corresponding hypoxic marker intensities in adjacent sections. This permits vascular configuration to be related to oxygen availability and allows the hypoxic marker intensities to be quantitated in situ.  (+info)

(4/9994) Rescue of diabetes-related impairment of angiogenesis by intramuscular gene therapy with adeno-VEGF.

Diabetes is a major risk factor for coronary and peripheral artery diseases. Although diabetic patients often present with advanced forms of these diseases, it is not known whether the compensatory mechanisms to vascular ischemia are affected in this condition. Accordingly, we sought to determine whether diabetes could: 1) impair the development of new collateral vessel formation in response to tissue ischemia and 2) inhibit cytokine-induced therapeutic neovascularization. Hindlimb ischemia was created by femoral artery ligation in nonobese diabetic mice (NOD mice, n = 20) and in control C57 mice (n = 20). Hindlimb perfusion was evaluated by serial laser Doppler studies after the surgery. In NOD mice, measurement of the Doppler flow ratio between the ischemic and the normal limb indicated that restoration of perfusion in the ischemic hindlimb was significantly impaired. At day 14 after surgery, Doppler flow ratio in the NOD mice was 0.49+/-0.04 versus 0.73+/-0.06 for the C57 mice (P< or =0.005). This impairment in blood flow recovery persisted throughout the duration of the study with Doppler flow ratio values at day 35 of 0.50+/-0.05 versus 0.90+/-0.07 in the NOD and C57 mice, respectively (P< or =0.001). CD31 immunostaining confirmed the laser Doppler data by showing a significant reduction in capillary density in the NOD mice at 35 days after surgery (302+/-4 capillaries/mm2 versus 782+/-78 in C57 mice (P< or =0.005). The reduction in neovascularization in the NOD mice was the result of a lower level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the ischemic tissues, as assessed by Northern blot, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The central role of VEGF was confirmed by showing that normal levels of neovascularization (compared with C57) could be achieved in NOD mice that had been supplemented for this growth factor via intramuscular injection of an adenoviral vector encoding for VEGF. We conclude that 1) diabetes impairs endogenous neovascularization of ischemic tissues; 2) the impairment in new blood vessel formation results from reduced expression of VEGF; and 3) cytokine supplementation achieved by intramuscular adeno-VEGF gene transfer restores neovascularization in a mouse model of diabetes.  (+info)

(5/9994) Inhibition of angiogenesis induces chromaffin differentiation and apoptosis in neuroblastoma.

Inhibition of angiogenesis has been shown to reduce tumor growth, metastasis, and tumor microvascular density in experimental models. To these effects we would now like to add induction of differentiation, based on biological analysis of xenografted human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, WAG rnu/rnu) treated with the angiogenesis inhibitor TNP-470. Treatment with TNP-470 (10 mg/kg s.c., n = 15) reduced the tumor growth by 66% and stereological vascular parameters (Lv, Vv, Sv) by 36-45%. The tumor cell apoptotic fraction increased more than threefold, resulting in a decrease in viable tumor cells by 33%. In contrast, the mean vascular diameter (29 microm) and the mean tumor cell proliferative index (49%) were unaffected. TNP-470-treated tumors exhibited striking chromaffin differentiation of neuroblastoma cells, observed as increased expression of insulin-like growth factor II gene (+88%), tyrosine hydroxylase (+96%), chromogranin A, and cellular processes. Statistical analysis revealed an inverse correlation between differentiation and angiogenesis. It is suggested that by inhibiting angiogenesis, TNP-470 induces metabolic stress, resulting in chromaffin differentiation and apoptosis in neuroblastoma. Such agonal differentiation may be the link between angiostatic therapy and tumor cell apoptosis.  (+info)

(6/9994) Early induction of angiogenetic signals in gliomas of GFAP-v-src transgenic mice.

Angiogenesis is a prerequisite for solid tumor growth. Glioblastoma multiforme, the most common malignant brain tumor, is characterized by extensive vascular proliferation. We previously showed that transgenic mice expressing a GFAP-v-src fusion gene in astrocytes develop low-grade astrocytomas that progressively evolve into hypervascularized glioblastomas. Here, we examined whether tumor progression triggers angiogenetic signals. We found abundant transcription of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in neoplastic astrocytes at surprisingly early stages of tumorigenesis. VEGF and v-src expression patterns were not identical, suggesting that VEGF activation was not only dependent on v-src. Late-stage gliomas showed perinecrotic VEGF up-regulation similarly to human glioblastoma. Expression patterns of the endothelial angiogenic receptors flt-1, flk-1, tie-1, and tie-2 were similar to those described in human gliomas, but flt-1 was expressed also in neoplastic astrocytes, suggesting an autocrine role in tumor growth. In crossbreeding experiments, hemizygous ablation of the tumor suppressor genes Rb and p53 had no significant effect on the expression of VEGF, flt-1, flk-1, tie-1, and tie-2. Therefore, expression of angiogenic signals is an early event during progression of GFAP-v-src tumors and precedes hypervascularization. Given the close similarities in the progression pattern between GFAP-v-src and human gliomas, the present results suggest that these mice may provide a useful tool for antiangiogenic therapy research.  (+info)

(7/9994) Endometrial microvascular growth in normal and dysfunctional states.

As a tissue that exhibits rapid cyclical growth and shedding throughout the reproductive life of the female, human endometrium provides a good model for the study of normal physiological angiogenesis. The objective of this paper is to summarize recent data on endometrial vascular growth, present new data on regional variability in endothelial cell proliferation within the endometrium, and interpret this information in light of current knowledge of the mechanisms by which angiogenesis occurs. Conventional angiogenesis normally involves a series of steps which include endothelial cell activation, breakdown of the basement membrane, migration and proliferation of the endothelial cell, fusion of sprouts, and tube formation. Other mechanisms by which angiogenesis occurs include intussusception and vessel elongation. Using immunohistochemical techniques we have shown repeatedly that levels of endothelial cell proliferation within human endometrium do not show any consistent pattern across the different stages of the menstrual cycle, which is unexpected since significant vascular growth must occur during the proliferative phase, when the endometrium increases in thickness by up to 4-fold. There are two possible explanations for this; either there is no obligatory link between endometrial endothelial cell proliferation and new vessel formation, or there is significant variation in endothelial cell proliferation within different regions of the same uterus. Multiple samples from hysterectomy specimens subsequently demonstrated that the variability is due to real differences between individuals, as well as showing that the endothelial cell proliferation index is significantly elevated in functionalis compared with basalis. During these studies we observed that endothelial cell proliferation nearly always appeared inside existing endometrial vessels, rather than be associated with structures that could be identified as vascular sprouts. To explore further whether sprout formation occurs during endometrial angiogenesis, we investigated the immunohistochemical distribution of integrin alphavbeta3 on endometrial endothelial cells. As for endothelial cell proliferation, integrin alphavbeta3 immunostaining was seen only on endothelial cells that appeared within existing blood vessels. The results from these studies have major implications for our understanding of the mechanisms that control endometrial angiogenesis. The lack of correlation between menstrual cycle stage and endothelial cell proliferation index, or endothelial cell expression of integrin alphavbeta3, suggests that vascular growth is not under the overall control of oestrogen and progesterone.  (+info)

(8/9994) Angiogenesis: a new theory for endometriosis.

Excessive endometrial angiogenesis is proposed as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Evidence is reviewed for the hypothesis that the endometrium of women with endometriosis has an increased capacity to proliferate, implant and grow in the peritoneal cavity. Data is summarized indicating that the endometrium of patients with endometriosis shows enhanced endothelial cell proliferation. Results are also reviewed indicating that the cell adhesion molecule integrin alphavbeta3 is expressed in more blood vessels in the endometrium of women with endometriosis when compared with normal women. Taken together, these results provide evidence for increased endometrial angiogenesis in women with endometriosis when compared with normal subjects. Endometriosis is one of the family of angiogenic diseases. Other angiogenic diseases include solid tumours, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and diabetic retanopathy. Excessive endometrial angiogenesis suggests novel new medical treatments for endometriosis aimed at the inhibition of angiogenesis.  (+info)