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(1/2113) Explanations for the clinical and microscopic localization of lesions in pemphigus foliaceus and vulgaris.

Patients with pemphigus foliaceus (PF) have blisters on skin, but not mucous membranes, whereas patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) develop blisters on mucous membranes and/or skin. PF and PV blisters are due to loss of keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion in the superficial and deep epidermis, respectively. PF autoantibodies are directed against desmoglein (Dsg) 1; PV autoantibodies bind Dsg3 or both Dsg3 and Dsg1. In this study, we test the hypothesis that coexpression of Dsg1 and Dsg3 in keratinocytes protects against pathology due to antibody-induced dysfunction of either one alone. Using passive transfer of pemphigus IgG to normal and DSG3(null) neonatal mice, we show that in the areas of epidermis and mucous membrane that coexpress Dsg1 and Dsg3, antibodies against either desmoglein alone do not cause spontaneous blisters, but antibodies against both do. In areas (such as superficial epidermis of normal mice) where Dsg1 without Dsg3 is expressed, anti-Dsg1 antibodies alone can cause blisters. Thus, the anti-desmoglein antibody profiles in pemphigus sera and the normal tissue distributions of Dsg1 and Dsg3 determine the sites of blister formation. These studies suggest that pemphigus autoantibodies inhibit the adhesive function of desmoglein proteins, and demonstrate that either Dsg1 or Dsg3 alone is sufficient to maintain keratinocyte adhesion.  (+info)

(2/2113) Circadian variation in the expression of cell-cycle proteins in human oral epithelium.

At the tissue level, there is experimental and clinical data to suggest a cytokinetic coordination of the cell cycle with a greater proportion of cycling cells entering S-phase and mitosis at specific times of the day. The association of certain cell-cycle proteins with defined events in the cell cycle is well established and may be used to study the timing of cell-cycle phases over 24 hours. In this study oral mucosal biopsies were obtained from six normal human volunteers at 4-hour intervals, six times over 24 hours. Using immunohistochemistry, the number of positive cells expressing the proteins p53, cyclin-E, cyclin-A, cyclin-B1, and Ki-67 was determined for each biopsy and expressed as the number of positive cells per mm of basement membrane. We found a statistically significant circadian variation in the nuclear expression of all of these proteins with the high point of expression for p53 at 10:56 hours, cyclin-E at 14:59 hours, cyclin-A at 16:09 hours, cyclin-B1 at 21:13 hours, and Ki-67 at 02:50 hours. The circadian variation in the nuclear expression of cyclins-E (G1/S phase), -A (G2-phase), and -B1 (M-phase) with a normal physiological progression over time suggests a statistically significant circadian variation in oral epithelial cell proliferation. The finding of a circadian variation in the nuclear expression of p53 protein corresponding to late G1 is novel. This information has clinical implications regarding the timing of chemotherapy and radiotherapy.  (+info)

(3/2113) Adhesive and mammalian transglutaminase substrate properties of Candida albicans Hwp1.

The pathogenesis of candidiasis involves invasion of host tissues by filamentous forms of the opportunistic yeast Candida albicans. Morphology-specific gene products may confer proinvasive properties. A hypha-specific surface protein, Hwp1, with similarities to mammalian small proline-rich proteins was shown to serve as a substrate for mammalian transglutaminases. Candida albicans strains lacking Hwp1 were unable to form stable attachments to human buccal epithelial cells and had a reduced capacity to cause systemic candidiasis in mice. This represents a paradigm for microbial adhesion that implicates essential host enzymes.  (+info)

(4/2113) Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is up-regulated in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

The purpose of this study was to determine whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was overexpressed in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expression of COX-2 in head and neck tissue. Mean levels of COX-2 mRNA were increased by nearly 150-fold in HNSCC (n = 24) compared with normal oral mucosa from healthy volunteers (n = 17). Additionally, there was about a 50-fold increase in amounts of COX-2 mRNA in normal-appearing epithelium adjacent to HNSCC (n = 10) compared with normal oral mucosa from healthy volunteers. Immunoblotting demonstrated that COX-2 protein was present in six of six cases of HNSCC but was undetectable in normal oral mucosa from healthy subjects. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that COX-2 was expressed in both HNSCC and adjacent normal-appearing epithelium. Taken together, these results suggest that COX-2 may be a target for the prevention or treatment of HNSCC.  (+info)

(5/2113) Nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoreticular tissue (NALT) immunity: fimbriae-specific Th1 and Th2 cell-regulated IgA responses for the inhibition of bacterial attachment to epithelial cells and subsequent inflammatory cytokine production.

To investigate the antibacterial activity of mucosal Th1 and Th2 immune responses induced nasally and orally, mice were immunized with mucosal vaccine containing fimbrial protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a causative agent for a destructive chronic inflammation in the periodontium, and cholera toxin (CT) as mucosal adjuvant. Nasal vaccine containing low doses of fimbriae (10 micrograms) and CT (1 microgram) induced Ag-specific Th1/Th2-type response in CD4+ T cells in mucosal effector tissues, including nasal passage and submandibular glands, which accounted for the generation of Ag-specific IgA-producing cells. In contrast, oral immunization required higher amounts of fimbriae and CT for the induction of Ag-specific IgA responses. Fimbriae-specific IgA mAbs generated from submandibular glands of nasally immunized mice inhibited P. gingivalis attachment to and reduced subsequent inflammatory cytokine production from epithelial cells. These findings suggest that nasal vaccination is an effective immunization regimen for the induction of Ag-specific Th1 and Th2 cell-driven IgA immune responses that possess the ability to inhibit bacterial attachment to epithelial cells and subsequent inflammatory cytokine production.  (+info)

(6/2113) Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 through breast-feeding: how can it be prevented?

One-third to two-thirds of maternal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection to breast-fed infants can be attributed to ingestion of breast milk. The presence of HIV-1 as cell-free and as cell-associated virus in milk has been documented. Several substances in breast milk may be protective against transmission, including maternal anti-HIV antibodies, vitamin A, lactoferrin, and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor. The portal of virus entry in the infant's gastrointestinal tract is unknown but may involve breaches in mucosal surfaces, transport across M cells, or direct infection of other epithelial cells, such as enterocytes. Timing of transmission of HIV-1 during lactation should be further clarified. An early rebound of plasma viremia after withdrawal of antiretrovirals was recently detected. This rebound may reduce the benefit of antiretroviral prophylaxis when women breast-feed their infants. Interventions should be viewed from the public health perspective of risks of infant morbidity and mortality associated with breast-feeding versus risks from formula-feeding.  (+info)

(7/2113) Oral transmission of primate lentiviruses.

Oral transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is well documented in children who become infected postnatally through breast milk. In contrast, epidemiologic surveys have yielded conflicting data regarding oral HIV-1 transmission among adults, even though case reports have described seroconversion and the development of AIDS in adults whose only risk was oral-genital contact. To study oral virus transmission in primate models, we exposed rhesus macaques of various ages to cell-free simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), including uncloned and molecularly cloned viruses. In neonates, viremia and AIDS developed after nontraumatic oral exposure to several SIV strains. Furthermore, chimeric simian human immunodeficiency viruses containing the HIV-1 envelope can also cross intact upper gastrointestinal mucosal surfaces in neonates. In adult macaques, infection and AIDS have resulted from well-controlled, nontraumatic, experimental oral exposure to different strains of SIV. These findings have implications for the risks of HIV-1 transmission during oral-genital contact.  (+info)

(8/2113) Mucosal dendritic cells and immunodeficiency viruses.

Dendritic cells [DCs] have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). When skin was used as a model for mucosae, the cutaneous DC-T cell milieu allowed the growth of HIV-1 and much of the newly produced virus could be detected in multinucleated DC-T cell syncytia. Such virus replication occurs irrespective of the genetic subtype, the syncytium- and non-syncytium-inducing capacities of the viruses, and whether they are classified as T cell- or macrophage-tropic. Similar DC-syncytia have been identified within the mucosal surfaces of the tonsillar tissue of HIV-1-infected persons. More recently, it was demonstrated that DC-T cell mixtures from the skin, mucosae, and blood of healthy macaques similarly support the replication of simian immunodeficiency virus. In both the human and monkey systems, active virus replication requires the presence of both DCs and T cells. Further studies using the macaque model are underway to elucidate the role of DCs in the transmission and spread of HIV infection.  (+info)