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(1/1416) Single-molecule anisotropy imaging.

A novel method, single-molecule anisotropy imaging, has been employed to simultaneously study lateral and rotational diffusion of fluorescence-labeled lipids on supported phospholipid membranes. In a fluid membrane composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, in which the rotational diffusion time is on the order of the excited-state lifetime of the fluorophore rhodamine, a rotational diffusion constant, D(rot) = 7 x 10(7) rad(2)/s, was determined. The lateral diffusion constant, measured by direct analysis of single-molecule trajectories, was D(lat) = 3.5 x 10(-8) cm(2)/s. As predicted from the free-volume model for diffusion, the results exhibit a significantly enhanced mobility on the nanosecond time scale. For membranes of DPPC lipids in the L(beta) gel phase, the slow rotational mobility permitted the direct observation of the rotation of individual molecules characterized by D(rot) = 1.2 rad(2)/s. The latter data were evaluated by a mean square angular displacement analysis. The technique developed here should prove itself profitable for imaging of conformational motions of individual proteins on the time scale of milliseconds to seconds.  (+info)

(2/1416) Real-time imaging of the dynamics of secretory granules in growth cones.

Secretory granules containing a hybrid protein consisting of the regulated secretory protein tissue plasminogen activator and an enhanced form of green fluorescent protein were tracked at high spatial resolution in growth cones of differentiated PC12 cells. Tracking shows that granules, unlike synaptic vesicles, generally are mobile in growth cones. Quantitative analysis of trajectories generated by granules revealed two dominant modes of motion: diffusive and directed. Diffusive motion was observed primarily in central and peripheral parts of growth cones, where most granules diffused two to four orders of magnitude more slowly than comparably sized spheres in dilute solution. Directed motion was observed primarily in proximal parts of growth cones, where a subset of granules underwent rapid, directed motion at average speeds comparable to those observed for granules in neurites. This high-resolution view of the dynamics of secretory granules in growth cones provides insight into granule organization and release at nerve terminals. In particular, the mobility of granules suggests that granules, unlike synaptic vesicles, are not tethered stably to cytoskeletal structures in nerve terminals. Moreover, the slow diffusive nature of this mobility suggests that secretory responses involving centrally distributed granules in growth cones will occur slowly, on a time scale of minutes or longer.  (+info)

(3/1416) Gadolinium-containing phosphatidylserine liposomes for molecular imaging of atherosclerosis.

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(4/1416) Quantum dots for live cell and in vivo imaging.

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(5/1416) Quantum dots - characterization, preparation and usage in biological systems.

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(6/1416) Synthesis and characterization of an (111)In-labeled peptide for the in vivo localization of human cancers expressing the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR).

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(7/1416) The application of on-chip optofluidic microscopy for imaging Giardia lamblia trophozoites and cysts.

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(8/1416) Visualization of the cell-selective distribution of PUFA-containing phosphatidylcholines in mouse brain by imaging mass spectrometry.

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