Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms. (1/17)

Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals.  (+info)

Direct multiplex sequencing (DMPS)--a novel method for targeted high-throughput sequencing of ancient and highly degraded DNA. (2/17)

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Ancient DNA reveals late survival of mammoth and horse in interior Alaska. (3/17)

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Removal of deaminated cytosines and detection of in vivo methylation in ancient DNA. (4/17)

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Temporal genetic change in the last remaining population of woolly mammoth. (5/17)

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Genomic DNA sequences from mastodon and woolly mammoth reveal deep speciation of forest and savanna elephants. (6/17)

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Complete Columbian mammoth mitogenome suggests interbreeding with woolly mammoths. (7/17)

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Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs. (8/17)

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