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(1/1040) Double-blind intervention trial on modulation of ozone effects on pulmonary function by antioxidant supplements.

The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute effects of ozone on lung function could be modulated by antioxidant vitamin supplementation in a placebo-controlled study. Lung function was measured in Dutch bicyclists (n = 38) before and after each training session on a number of occasions (n = 380) during the summer of 1996. The vitamin group (n = 20) received 100 mg of vitamin E and 500 mg of vitamin C daily for 15 weeks. The average ozone concentration during exercise was 77 microg/m3 (range, 14-186 microg/m3). After exclusion of subjects with insufficient compliance from the analysis, a difference in ozone exposure of 100 microg/m3 decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) 95 ml (95% confidence interval (CI) -265 to -53) in the placebo group and 1 ml (95% CI -94 to 132) in the vitamin group; for forced vital capacity, the change was -125 ml (95% CI -384 to -36) in the placebo group and -42 ml (95% CI -130 to 35) in the vitamin group. The differences in ozone effect on lung function between the groups were statistically significant. The results suggest that supplementation with the antioxidant vitamins C and E confers partial protection against the acute effects of ozone on FEV1 and forced vital capacity in cyclists.  (+info)

(2/1040) Evaluation of pulmonary volumetric morphometry at the light and electron microscopy level in several species of passerine birds.

The lungs of 3 small passerine species, having similar body mass but different diurnal activity patterns, were analysed morphometrically to assess the relationship between diurnal activity and pulmonary volumetry at the light and electron microscope levels. The percentage volumes of the major lung and exchange tissue components of the 3 species--an aerial insectivore, a foliage gleaner/nectarivore and a ground forager--were strikingly similar, and consistent with literature values for other passerine species. The only significant difference found was exchange tissue plasma volume and pulmonary haematocrit, with the ground-foraging, low activity Malurus splendens having significantly lower values than the other 2 species. This may indicate that cardiovascular parameters are more important determinants of metabolic activity in small passerines than aspects of pulmonary anatomy.  (+info)

(3/1040) Expiratory and inspiratory chest computed tomography and pulmonary function tests in cigarette smokers.

This study evaluated small airway dysfunction and emphysematous destruction of lung parenchyma in cigarette smokers, using chest expiratory high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFT). The degree of emphysematous destruction was classified by visual scoring (VS) and the average HRCT number at full expiration/full inspiration (E/I ratio) calculated in 63 male smokers and 10 male nonsmokers (group A). The Brinkman smoking index (BI), defined as cigarettes x day(-1) x yrs, was estimated. Sixty-three smokers were divided into three groups by PFT: group B1 (n=7), with normal PFT; group B2 (n=21), with diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DL,CO) > or = 80% predicted, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) < 80% pred and/or residual volume (RV) > 120% pred; and group B3 (n=35), with DL,CO < 80% pred, FEV1 < 80% pred and/or RV > 120% pred. Heavy smokers (BI > or = 600) (n=48) showed a significant increase in emphysema by both VS and E/I. E/I was significantly elevated in both group B2 (mean+/-SD 0.95+/-0.05) and B3 (0.96+/-0.06) compared with group B1 (0.89+/-0.03). VS could not differentiate group B2 (3.9+/-5.0) from B1 (1.1+/-1.6). These findings suggest that the expiration/inspiration ratio reflects hyperinflation and airway obstruction, regardless of the functional characteristics of emphysema, in cigarette smokers.  (+info)

(4/1040) Human lung volumes and the mechanisms that set them.

Definitions of human lung volumes and the mechanisms that set them are reviewed in the context of pulmonary function testing, with attention to the distinction between functional residual capacity (FRC) and the static relaxation volume of the respiratory system, and to the circumstances in which FRC and residual volume are set by dynamic rather than by static mechanisms. Related terms, conventions, and issues are addressed, including some common semantic and conceptual difficulties, with attention to "gas trapping", "hyperinflation", and "restriction".  (+info)

(5/1040) Compliance and stability of the bronchial wall in a model of allergen-induced lung inflammation.

Airway wall remodeling in response to inflammation might alter load on airway smooth muscle and/or change airway wall stability. We therefore determined airway wall compliance and closing pressures in an animal model. Weanling pigs were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA; ip and sc, n = 6) and were subsequently challenged three times with OVA aerosol. Control pigs received 0.9% NaCl (n = 4) in place of OVA aerosol. Bronchoconstriction in vivo was assessed from lung resistance and dynamic compliance. Semistatic airway compliance was recorded ex vivo in isolated segments of bronchus, after the final OVA aerosol or 0.9% NaCl challenge. Internally or externally applied pressure needed to close bronchial segments was determined in the absence or presence of carbachol (1 microM). Sensitized pig lungs exhibited immediate bronchoconstriction to OVA aerosol and also peribronchial accumulations of monocytes and granulocytes. Compliance was reduced in sensitized bronchi in vitro (P < 0.01), and closing pressures were increased (P < 0.05). In the presence of carbachol, closing pressures of control and sensitized bronchi were not different. We conclude that sensitization and/or inflammation increases airway load and airway stability.  (+info)

(6/1040) System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control mechanisms: diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

We applied cardiovascular system identification (CSI) to characterize closed-loop cardiovascular regulation in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). The CSI method quantitatively analyzes beat-to-beat fluctuations in noninvasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize four physiological coupling mechanisms, two of which are autonomically mediated (the heart rate baroreflex and the coupling of respiration, measured in terms of ILV, to heart rate) and two of which are mechanically mediated (the coupling of ventricular contraction to the generation of the ABP wavelet and the coupling of respiration to ABP). We studied 37 control and 60 diabetic subjects who were classified as having minimal, moderate, or severe DAN on the basis of standard autonomic tests. The autonomically mediated couplings progressively decreased with increasing severity of DAN, whereas the mechanically mediated couplings were essentially unchanged. CSI identified differences between the minimal DAN and control groups, which were indistinguishable based on the standard autonomic tests. CSI may provide a powerful tool for assessing DAN.  (+info)

(7/1040) Thoracic gas volume in early childhood.

A total body plethysmograph is descirbed which was used to study thoracic gas volume (TGV) in infants and young children from birth to 2 1/2 years, and was suitable for use even in very sick babies. Normal TGV values were obtained in 42 studies of 35 healthy infants and young children, and 16 children with abnormal lung volume are described. TGV correlated well with length, weight, chest circumference, and age in the healthy infants. A low TGV was found in children with respiratory difficulties after cardiac and thoracic surgery, in respiratory distress syndrome of the newborn, and in association with pulmonary infection and chest cage abnormalities. Abnormally high TGV was most frequently seen in infants with small airways disease.  (+info)

(8/1040) Comparison of two new methods for the measurement of lung volumes with two standard methods.

BACKGROUND: The two most commonly used methods for the measurement of lung volumes are helium dilution and body plethysmography. Two methods have been developed which are both easier and less time consuming to perform. Mathematical modelling uses complex calculations from the flow-volume loop to derive total lung capacity (TLC), and the nitrogen balance technique uses nitrogen from the atmosphere to calculate lung volume in a similar way to helium dilution. This study was designed to compare the two new methods with the two standard methods. METHODS: Sixty one subjects were studied, 23 with normal lung function, 17 with restrictive airway disease, and 21 with obstructive ventilatory defects. Each subject underwent repeated measurements of TLC by each of the four methods in random order. Reproducible values were obtained for each method according to BTS/ARTP guidelines. Bland-Altman plots were constructed for comparisons between the methods and paired t tests were used to assess differences in means. RESULTS: Bland-Altman plots showed that the differences between body plethysmography and helium dilution fell into clinically acceptable ranges (agreement limits +/-0.9 l). The agreement between mathematical modelling or the nitrogen balance technique and helium dilution or body plethysmography was poor (+/-1.8-3.4 l), especially for subjects with airflow obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Neither of the new methods agrees sufficiently with standard methods to be useful in a clinical setting.  (+info)