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(1/1952) Mechanisms of bronchoprotection by anesthetic induction agents: propofol versus ketamine.

BACKGROUND: Propofol and ketamine have been purported to decrease bronchoconstriction during induction of anesthesia and intubation. Whether they act on airway smooth muscle or through neural reflexes has not been determined. We compared propofol and ketamine to attenuate the direct activation of airway smooth muscle by methacholine and limit neurally mediated bronchoconstriction (vagal nerve stimulation). METHODS: After approval from the institutional review board, eight sheep were anesthetized with pentobarbital, paralyzed, and ventilated. After left thoracotomy, the bronchial artery was cannulated and perfused. In random order, 5 mg/ml concentrations of propofol, ketamine, and thiopental were infused into the bronchial artery at rates of 0.06, 0.20, and 0.60 ml/min. After 10 min, airway resistance was measured before and after vagal nerve stimulation and methacholine given via the bronchial artery. Data were expressed as a percent of baseline response before infusion of drug and analyzed by analysis of variance with significance set at P< or =0.05. RESULTS: Systemic blood pressure was not affected by any of the drugs (P>0.46). Baseline airway resistance was not different among the three agents (P = 0.56) or by dose (P = 0.96). Infusion of propofol and ketamine into the bronchial artery caused a dose-dependent attenuation of the vagal nerve stimulation-induced bronchoconstriction to 26+/-11% and 8+/-2% of maximum, respectively (P<0.0001). In addition, propofol caused a significant decrease in the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction to 43+/-27% of maximum at the highest concentration (P = 0.05) CONCLUSIONS: The local bronchoprotective effects of ketamine and propofol on airways is through neurally mediated mechanisms. Although the direct effects on airway smooth muscle occur at high concentrations, these are unlikely to be of primary clinical relevance.  (+info)

(2/1952) Bioavailability and metabolism of hydroquinone after intratracheal instillation in male rats.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the rate and extent of hydroquinone (HQ) absorption and first pass metabolism in the lungs of male rats in vivo. [14C]HQ in physiological saline was administered intratracheally via an indwelling endotracheal tube to simulate inhalation exposure to HQ dust. The bioavailability of HQ was determined by blood sampling simultaneously at arterial and venous sites beginning immediately after administration to conscious rats. Pulmonary absorption and metabolism, and systemic metabolism and elimination were determined by chromatographic analysis of parent compound and metabolites in blood samples after intratracheal administration of [14C]HQ at 0.1, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg. Pulmonary absorption of HQ was found to be very rapid with [14C]HQ detectable in arterial blood, and to a lesser extent in venous blood, within 5 to 10 s after dose administration. Only [14C]HQ was detected in the initial (5-10 s) arterial blood samples at all dose levels, indicating that pulmonary metabolism of HQ was not extensive. However, later blood samples (45-720 s) indicated rapid metabolism and elimination of the parent compound and metabolites after intratracheal absorption. The elimination half-life from the 0.1 mg/kg dose was allometrically scaled to human proportions and used to estimate the steady-state (maximum) human blood concentrations of HQ resulting from presupposed workplace exposures. The estimates indicated minimal levels of HQ in human blood after respiratory exposures of greater than 1 h at 0.1 or 2.0 mg/m3; these levels were less than background concentrations of HQ detected in human blood in previous studies.  (+info)

(3/1952) Inhalation exposure of animals.

Relative advantages and disadvantages and important design criteria for various exposure methods are presented. Five types of exposures are discussed: whole-body chambers, head-only exposures, nose or mouth-only methods, lung-only exposures, and partial-lung exposures. Design considerations covered include: air cleaning and conditioning; construction materials; losses of exposure materials; evenness of exposure; sampling biases; animal observation and care; noise and vibration control, safe exhausts, chamber loading, reliability, pressure fluctuations; neck seals, masks, animal restraint methods; and animal comfort. Ethical considerations in use of animals in inhalation experiments are also discussed.  (+info)

(4/1952) Correlating fibreoptic nasotracheal endoscopy performance and psychomotor aptitude.

We have investigated the correlation between the scores attained on computerized psychometric tests, measuring psychomotor and information processing aptitudes, and learning fibreoptic endoscopy with the videoendoscope. Sixteen anaesthetic trainees performed two adaptive tracking tasks (ADTRACK 2 and ADTRACK 3) and one information management task (MAZE) from the MICROPAT testing system. They then embarked on a standardized fibreoptic training programme during which they performed 15 supervised fibreoptic nasotracheal intubations on anaesthetized oral surgery patients. There was a significant correlation between the means of the 15 endoscopy times and both ADTRACK 2 (r = -0.599, P = 0.014) and ADTRACK 3 (r = -0.589, P = 0.016) scores. The correlation between the means of the 15 endoscopy times and MAZE scores was not significant. The ratios of the mean endoscopy time for the last seven endoscopies to the mean endoscopy time for the first seven endoscopies were not significantly correlated with ADTRACK 2, ADTRACK 3 or MAZE scores. Psychomotor abilities appeared to be determinants of trainees' initial proficiency in endoscopy, but did not appear to be determinants of trainees' rates of progress during early fibreoptic training.  (+info)

(5/1952) Evaluation of routine tracheal extubation in children: inflating or suctioning technique?

We studied prospectively the effects of the technique of tracheal extubation on arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2) in 120 ASA I-III children, mean age 5.3 (range 0.25-16.9) yr. At completion of surgery, tracheal extubation was performed when spontaneous ventilation had resumed, children were fully awake and SpO2 was 99-100%. Children were allocated randomly to receive a single lung inflation manoeuvre with 100% oxygen before tracheal extubation (group I; n = 59) or to have the tracheal tube removed while applying suction through the tube (group S; n = 61). SpO2 was monitored during the first 5 min after tracheal extubation in the operating room. Supplementary oxygen was given if SpO2 decreased to less than 92%. The time between tracheal extubation and decrease in SpO2 to 92% (T92) was recorded. Children in group S required oxygen administration more frequently after tracheal extubation than those in group I (65.6% vs 45.8%; P = 0.04), and had a three-fold shortening of T92 (mean 25 (SD 19) s vs 85 (63) s; P = 0.0001). These effects were more pronounced in children less than 4 yr of age compared with older children. We conclude that tracheal extubation greatly impaired oxygenation and therefore administration of oxygen was appropriate. This impairment was more marked when suction was used, and in young children. Lung inflation with 100% oxygen before removal of the tracheal tube is advised before routine tracheal extubation in children.  (+info)

(6/1952) Effect of remifentanil on the auditory evoked response and haemodynamic changes after intubation and surgical incision.

We have observed the effect of intubation and incision, as measured by the auditory evoked response (AER) and haemodynamic variables, in 12 patients undergoing hernia repair or varicose vein surgery who received remifentanil as part of either an inhaled anaesthetic technique using isoflurane or as part of a total i.v. technique using propofol. Anaesthesia was induced with remifentanil 1 microgram kg-1 and propofol, neuromuscular block was achieved with atracurium 0.6 mg kg-1 before intubation, and anaesthesia was maintained with a continuous infusion of remifentanil in combination with either a continuous infusion of propofol or inhaled isoflurane. The AER and haemodynamic variables were measured before and after intubation and incision. The effects of intubation and incision on the AER and haemodynamic variables were not significantly different between the remifentanil-propofol and remifentanil-isoflurane groups. However, the study had a low power for this comparison. When the data for the two anaesthetic combinations were pooled, the only significant effects were increases in diastolic arterial pressure and heart rate immediately after intubation; these were not seen 5 min after intubation. There were no cardiovascular responses to incision. There were no significant changes in the AER after intubation or incision.  (+info)

(7/1952) Large goitre causing difficult intubation and failure to intubate using the intubating laryngeal mask airway: lessons for next time.

A 63-yr-old woman was anaesthetized for sub-total thyroidectomy. The thyroid gland was large, deviating the trachea to the right and causing 30% tracheal narrowing at the level of the suprasternal notch. Mask ventilation was easy but laryngoscopy was Cormack and Lehane grade 3. Despite being able to see the tip of the epiglottis, tracheal intubation was impossible. An intubating laryngeal mask was inserted and although the airway was clear and ventilation easy, it was not possible to intubate the trachea either blindly or with the fibreoptic bronchoscope. Tracheal intubation was eventually achieved using a 6.5-mm cuffed oral tracheal tube via a size 4 laryngeal mask under fibreoptic control. We describe the case in detail and discuss the use of the intubating laryngeal mask, its potential limitations and how to optimize its use in similar circumstances.  (+info)

(8/1952) The presence and sequence of endotracheal tube colonization in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

Endotracheal tube colonization in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation was investigated. In the first part of this prospective study, the airway access tube was examined for the presence of secretions, airway obstruction and bacterial colonization, in cases undergoing extubation or tube change. In the second part of the study, the sequence of oropharyngeal, gastric, respiratory tract and endotracheal tube colonization was investigated by sequential swabbing at each site twice daily for 5 days in consecutive noninfected patients. In the first part, it was noted that all airway access tubes of cases undergoing extubation had secretions lining the interior of the distal third of the tube which were shown on scanning electron microscopy to be a biofilm. Gram-negative micro-organisms were isolated from these secretions in all but three cases. In the second part, it was noted that the sequence of colonization in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation was the oropharynx (36 h), the stomach (3660 h), the lower respiratory tract (60-84 h), and thereafter the endotracheal tube (60-96 h). Nosocomial pneumonia occurred in 13 patients and in eight cases identical organisms were noted in lower respiratory tract secretions and in secretions lining the interior of the endotracheal tube. The endotracheal tube of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation becomes colonized rapidly with micro-organisms commonly associated with nosocomial pneumonia, and which may represent a persistent source of organisms causing such infections.  (+info)