(1/1040) Peripheral hepatojejunostomy as palliative treatment for irresectable malignant tumors of the liver hilum.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the concept of surgical decompression of the biliary tree by peripheral hepatojejunostomy for palliative treatment of jaundice in patients with irresectable malignant tumors of the liver hilum. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Jaundice, pruritus, and recurrent cholangitis are major clinical complications in patients with obstructive cholestasis resulting from malignant tumors of the liver hilum. Methods for palliative treatment include endoscopic stenting, percutaneous transhepatic drainage, and surgical decompression. The palliative treatment of choice should be safe, effective, and comfortable for the patient. METHODS: In a retrospective study, surgical technique, perioperative complications, and efficacy of treatment were analyzed for 56 patients who had received a peripheral hepatojejunostomy between 1982 and 1997. Laparotomy in all of these patients had been performed as an attempt for curative resection. RESULTS: Hepatojejunostomy was exclusively palliative in 50 patients and was used for bridging to resection or transplantation in 7. Anastomosis was bilateral in 36 patients and unilateral in 20. The 1-month mortality in the study group was 9%; median survival was 6 months. In patients surviving >1 month, a marked and persistent decrease in cholestasis was achieved in 87%, although complete return to normal was rare. Among the patients with a marked decrease in cholestasis, 72% had no or only mild clinical symptoms such as fever or jaundice. CONCLUSIONS: Peripheral hepatojejunostomy is a feasible and reasonably effective palliative treatment for patients with irresectable tumors of the liver hilum. In patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy for attempted curative resection, this procedure frequently leads to persistent-although rarely complete-decompression of the biliary tree. In a few cases it may also be used for bridging to transplantation or liver resection after relief of cholestasis.  (+info)

(2/1040) Effect of coronary occlusion on left ventricular function with and without collateral supply during beating heart coronary artery surgery.

OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of coronary occlusion and collateral supply on left ventricular (LV) function during beating heart coronary artery surgery. DESIGN: Prospective intraoperative study, performed at baseline, during wall stabilisation, coronary artery occlusion, and 2 and 10 minutes after reperfusion. Transoesophageal M mode echocardiograms, simultaneous high fidelity LV pressure, and thermodilution cardiac output were measured. LV anterior wall thickening, thinning velocities, thickening fraction, regional work, and power production were derived. Asynchrony during the isovolumic periods was quantified as cycle efficiency. SETTING: Tertiary referral cardiac centre. PATIENTS: 14 patients with stable angina, mean (SD) age 62 (7) years, undergoing left anterior descending artery grafting using the "Octopus" device. RESULTS: Collaterals were absent in nine patients and present in five. Epicardial stabilisation did not affect LV function. Results are expressed as mean (SD). Coronary occlusion (15.6 (2) minutes) depressed anterior wall thickening (1.4 (0.6) v 2.6 (0.6) cm/s) and thinning velocities (1.4 (0.5) v 3.0 (0.6) cm/s), regional work (2.2 (0.8) v 4.6 (0.6) mJ/cm2), and power (21 (4) v 33 (5) mW/cm2) in patients without collaterals (p < 0.05 for all), but only wall thinning (3.5 (0.5) v 4.8 (0.5) cm/s, p < 0.05) in patients with collaterals. All returned to baseline within 10 minutes of reperfusion. Cycle efficiency and regional work were impaired at baseline and fell during occlusion, regardless of collaterals. Within 10 minutes of reperfusion both had increased above baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Coronary occlusion for up to 15 minutes during beating heart coronary artery surgery depressed standard measurements of systolic and diastolic anterior wall function in patients without collaterals, but only those of diastolic function in patients with collaterals. Regional synchrony decreased in both groups. All disturbances regressed within 10 minutes of reperfusion.  (+info)

(3/1040) Non-operative management of acetabular fractures. The use of dynamic stress views.

To assess the stability of the hip after acetabular fracture, dynamic fluoroscopic stress views were taken of 41 acetabular fractures that met the criteria for non-operative management. These included roof arcs of 45 degrees, a subchondral CT arc of 10 mm, displacement of less than 50% of the posterior wall, and congruence on the AP and Judet views of the hip. There were three unstable hips which were treated by open reduction and internal fixation. The remaining 38 fractures were treated non-operatively with early mobilisation and delayed weight-bearing. At a mean follow-up of 2.7 years, the results were good or excellent in 91% of the cases. Three fair results were ascribed to the patients' other injuries. Dynamic stress views can identify subtle instability in patients who would normally be considered for non-operative treatment.  (+info)

(4/1040) The use of electrophysiological monitoring in the intraoperative management of intracranial aneurysms.

OBJECTIVES: Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) have been increasingly utilised during surgery for intracranial aneurysms to identify cerebral ischaemia. Between July 1994 and April 1996, we surgically treated 70 aneurysms in 49 consecutive patients (58 operations) with the aid of intraoperative evoked potential monitoring. This study sought to evaluate the usefulness of SSEP and BAEP monitoring during intracranial aneurysm surgery. METHODS: Mean patient age was 51.9 (range 18-79) years. The sizes of the aneurysms were 3-4 mm (15), 5-9 mm (26), 10-14 mm (11), 15-19 mm (seven), 20-24 mm (six), and >25 mm (five). SSEPs were monitored in 58 procedures (100%) and BAEPs in 15 (26%). The neurological status of the patients was evaluated before and after surgery. RESULTS: Thirteen of the 58 procedures (22%) monitored with SSEPs had SSEP changes (12 transient, one persistent); 45 (78%) had no SSEP changes. Three of 15 patients (20%) monitored with BAEPs had changes (two transient, one persistent); 12 (80%) had no BAEP changes. Of the 14 patients with transient SSEP or BAEP changes, these changes resolved with adjustment or removal of aneurysm clips (nine), elevating MAP (four), or retractor adjustment (one). Mean time from precipitating event to electrophysiological change was 8.9 minutes (range 3-32), and the mean time for recovery of potentials in patients with transient changes was 20.2 minutes (range 3-60). Clinical outcome was excellent in 39 patients, good in five, and poor in three (two patients died), and was largely related to pretreatment grade. CONCLUSIONS: SSEPs and BAEPs are useful in preventing clinical neurological injury during surgery for intracranial aneurysms and in predicting which patients will have unfavourable outcomes.  (+info)

(5/1040) Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement through a transverse sternotomy: a word of caution.

OBJECTIVES: To compare aortic valve replacement (AVR) using a minimally invasive approach through a transverse sternotomy with the established approach of median sternotomy. DESIGN: Retrospective, case-control study. PATIENTS: Fourteen high risk patients (median age 78, Parsonnet score of 18%) who underwent AVR performed through a minimally invasive transverse sternotomy were compared with a historical group of patients matched for age, sex, and Parsonnet score who underwent AVR performed through a median sternotomy by the same surgeon. OUTCOME MEASURES: Cross clamp time, total bypass time, intensive care stay, postoperative in-hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality. RESULTS: There were two deaths in the minimally invasive group and none in the control group (NS). The cross clamp and total bypass times were longer in the minimally invasive group (67 and 92 minutes v 46 and 66 minutes, p < 0.001). There was a higher incidence of re-exploration for bleeding (14% v 0%) and paravalvar leaks (21% v 0%) in the minimally invasive group but these differences were not significant. The minimally invasive group had a longer postoperative in-hospital stay (p = 0.025). The incidence of mortality or major morbidity was 43% (six of 14) in the minimally invasive group and 7% (one of 14) in the matched pairs (p = 0.013). CONCLUSIONS: AVR can be performed through a transverse sternotomy but the operation takes longer and there is an unacceptably high incidence of morbidity and mortality.  (+info)

(6/1040) Validation of an automated technique for determining the mechanical characteristics of coronary arteries during balloon angioplasty: laboratory assessment with necropsy segments.

OBJECTIVES: To develop a technique for automatic inflation of a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) balloon, with continuous measurement of the balloon pressure and volume; to validate the technique for determining the mechanical characteristics of coronary arteries. METHODS: During necropsy examination of the hearts of nine patients, 17 coronary artery samples were obtained for histological examination. A PTCA balloon was inserted into each artery, and the balloon pressure and volume were measured continuously during four repeat automatic inflations of the balloon. RESULTS: Of the 17 arteries, eight showed elastic, six plastic, and three fracture pressure-volume deformation characteristics. For the plastic deformations, the first inflation required a higher pressure than subsequent repeat inflations of 82 (61) kPa (mean (SD), range 25 to 175 kPa). For the three in the fracture group, the pressure drop because of the fracture occurred between 210 and 540 kPa. Two of these three showed a tear on visual inspection, and the other showed disruption of the intimal plaque on blinded histological examination. Of the six with plastic deformation characteristics alone, one showed a tear, and on histological examination two others showed splitting of the internal and external elastic lamina and one showed separation of intima and media. None in the elastic group showed any of these characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Plastic and fracture deformation characteristics could be differentiated from elastic characteristics. Visual or histological evidence of fracturing was present in all three arteries identified during angioplasty as having pressure-volume fracture characteristics.  (+info)

(7/1040) Radiation dose to patients and personnel during intraoperative digital subtraction angiography.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The use of intraoperative angiography to assess the results of neurovascular surgery is increasing. The purpose of this study was to measure the radiation dose to patients and personnel during intraoperative angiography and to determine the effect of experience. METHODS: Fifty consecutive intraoperative angiographic studies were performed during aneurysmal clipping or arteriovenous malformation resection from June 1993 to December 1993 and another 50 from December 1994 to June 1995. Data collected prospectively included fluoroscopy time, digital angiography time, number of views, and amount of time the radiologist spent in the room. Student's t-test was used to assess statistical significance. Effective doses were calculated from radiation exposure measurements using adult thoracic and head phantoms. RESULTS: The overall median examination required 5.2 minutes of fluoroscopy, 55 minutes of operating room use, 40 seconds of digital angiographic series time, and four views and runs. The mean room time and the number of views and runs increased in the second group of patients. A trend toward reduced fluoroscopy time was noted. Calculated effective doses for median values were as follows: patient, 76.7 millirems (mrems); radiologist, 0.028 mrems; radiology technologist, 0.044 mrems; and anesthesiologist, 0.016 mrems. CONCLUSION: Intraoperative angiography is performed with a reasonable radiation dose to the patient and personnel. The number of angiographic views and the radiologist's time in the room increase with experience.  (+info)

(8/1040) Are changes in the evoked electromyogram during anaesthesia without neuromuscular blocking agents caused by failure of supramaximal nerve stimulation?

The evoked electromyogram often decreases during anaesthesia in the absence of neuromuscular block. We have measured the electromyogram of the first dorsal interosseous muscle evoked by train-of-four stimulation of the ulnar nerve in 63 patients undergoing anaesthesia for minor surgery. We used Medicotest P-00-S electrodes, a Datex Relaxograph and a current sink in the stimulating leads in parallel with the current path through the patient. The current sink was used to shunt some of the maximum available output current from the Relaxograph while maintaining the supramaximal stimulus current passing through the patient. After 30 min of anaesthesia, when the muscle response to train-of-four was stable, the ulnar nerve stimulus current was increased by reducing the proportion shunted through the current sink. The electromyographic response did not change during the study in 13 patients. In the remaining 50 patients, the response decreased to 78.4% (SD 27.1%, range 7.5-95.0%) of baseline values over the first 20 min of anaesthesia. In 22 of these patients, the electromyographic response increased from 71.4 (SD 22.6)% to 92.3 (9.5)% of baseline responses when the stimulus current was increased by 12.3 (2.4) mA, while in the remaining 28 patients the response decreased to 83.7 (10.6)% and did not increase with increasing stimulus current. These results suggest that loss of supramaximal stimulation is partly responsible for the observed changes in the evoked electromyogram during anaesthesia.  (+info)