Effects of maternal acetazolamide treatment on body weights and incisor development of the fetal rat. (1/1014)

The incisor development of fetal rats on gestation day 19 was well correlated with their fetal weights. The number of odontoblasts in the mandibular incisors, an index of incisor development, increased more than that of the maxillary incisors with increase in fetal body weights. Maternal acetazolamide treatments were observed to suppress the mean fetal weight and to retard incisor development. A smaller incisor size, a thinner predentin layer, and fewer odontoblasts were characteristic of the acetazolamide group. There was also a good correlation between the fetal weights and the number of odontoblasts in the acetazolamide group. From these results, we postulated that the retarded incisor development of the fetal rats caused by the maternal acetazolamide treatment was related to their suppressed fetal weights. However, the regression coefficient of the fetal weights and the number of odontoblasts in the acetazolamide group was smaller than that of the vehicle control group. It may indicate that retarded incisor development in response to maternal acetazolamide treatment is to some extent independent of suppressed fetal weight.  (+info)

A modern human pattern of dental development in lower pleistocene hominids from Atapuerca-TD6 (Spain). (2/1014)

The study of life history evolution in hominids is crucial for the discernment of when and why humans have acquired our unique maturational pattern. Because the development of dentition is critically integrated into the life cycle in mammals, the determination of the time and pattern of dental development represents an appropriate method to infer changes in life history variables that occurred during hominid evolution. Here we present evidence derived from Lower Pleistocene human fossil remains recovered from the TD6 level (Aurora stratum) of the Gran Dolina site in the Sierra de Atapuerca, northern Spain. These hominids present a pattern of development similar to that of Homo sapiens, although some aspects (e.g., delayed M3 calcification) are not as derived as that of European populations and people of European origin. This evidence, taken together with the present knowledge of cranial capacity of these and other late Early Pleistocene hominids, supports the view that as early as 0.8 Ma at least one Homo species shared with modern humans a prolonged pattern of maturation.  (+info)

Scanning electron microscopy of the lateral cell surfaces of rat incisor ameloblasts. (3/1014)

Dry dissected rat incisor ameloblasts studied in the scanning electron microscope show remarkable specializations of their lateral surfaces. Four or five cycles of a change from a surface with longitudinal gutterlike folds associated with large intercellular spaces, to one with microvilli and reduced intercellular spaces, are found along the length of the lower incisor maturation zone. It is argued that these changes indicate cyclical activity in maturation ameloblasts.  (+info)

Morphological changes in periodontal mechanoreceptors of mouse maxillary incisors after the experimental induction of anterior crossbite: a light and electron microscopic observation using immunohistochemistry for PGP 9.5. (4/1014)

Ruffini nerve endings (mechanoreceptors) in the periodontal ligament (PDL) of mouse incisors were examined to elucidate whether experimentally-induced crossbites cause any changes or abnormalities in their morphology and distribution. Anterior guiding planes were attached to the mandibular incisors of 3-week-old C3H/HeSlc mice. At 3 days and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks post-attachment of the appliance, the mice were sacrificed by perfusion fixation. Frozen sagittal cryostat sections of the decalcified maxillary incisors were processed for immunohistochemistry of protein gene product 9.5, followed by histochemical determination of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity to reveal sites of alveolar bone resorption. Despite the absence of bone resorption within the lingual PDL of control mice, distinct resorption sites were seen in the respective regions of the experimental animals. Unlike the controls, many Ruffini endings showing vague and swollen contours, with unusually long and pedunculated micro-projections were observed in the affected lingual PDL of the incisors in the experimental animals with short-term anterior crossbite induction. Club-shaped nerve terminations with few, if any, micro-projections were observed in the lingual PDL of experimental animals with long-term induction, as well as in aged control mouse incisors. Differences in the distribution of Ruffini endings were also observed. These results indicate that changing the direction of the force applied to the PDL results in rapid and prolonged changes in the morphology of Ruffini-like mechanoreceptors.  (+info)

Arrested eruption of the permanent lower second molar. (5/1014)

The incidence of retention/impaction of the permanent lower second molar (M2inf) lies between 0.6/1000 and 3/1000. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the craniofacial morphology, the frequency of dental anomalies and the inclination of the affected M2inf and the adjacent first molar in patients with arrested eruption of M2inf. The overall goal was to elucidate the aetiology of arrested tooth eruption and to present the characteristics of these patients in order to improve diagnosis and treatment planning. Radiographic material (profile radiographs and orthopantomograms) from 19 patients (nine females and 10 males; 13-19 years of age at the time of referral) were analysed. The ages of the patients when profile radiographs were taken for cephalometric analysis varied from 8 to 16 years. The study shows that this group of patients, compared with a reference group, had an increased sagittal jaw relationship (Class II). Specifically, the mandibular prognathism was less, the mandibular gonial angle smaller, the mandibular alveolar prognathism enlarged and the maxillary incisor inclination less than in the reference group. Furthermore, this group of patients had a more frequent occurrence of morphological tooth anomalies, such as root deflections, invaginations, and taurodontism. However, none of the patients with arrested eruption of M2inf had agenesis of the lower third molar. The study did not reveal an association between the degree of inclination of the M2inf and that of the first molar in the same region. The results of this investigation show that conditions such as the craniofacial morphology and deviations in the dentition are associated with arrested eruption of M2inf. Therefore, it is important to evaluate these conditions in future diagnosis and treatment planning of patients with arrested eruption of M2inf.  (+info)

The length and eruption rates of incisor teeth in rats after one or more of them had been unimpeded. (6/1014)

The eruption rate and length of all four incisor teeth in rats were measured under ether anaesthesia by recording the position of marks on their labial surfaces at 2-day intervals, using calibrated graticules in microscope eyepieces. The rats were divided into four groups and either a lower, an upper, both a lower and an upper, or no incisors were unimpeded. This paper describes the changes when the unimpeded incisors returned to the occlusion. Neither the unimpeded nor the impeded incisors simply returned to control values immediately the period of unimpeded eruption ended, but showed transient changes in their lengths and eruption rates. The results confirm that eruption rates are determined by the sum of the lengths of the lower and upper incisors, rather than by their own lengths, with longer teeth erupting more slowly. Specifically, restoring the bevel to the incisors did not slow their eruption below normal impeded rates. The slowing of the eruption of the longer of two adjacent incisors was related to the length differences of the incisors in the same jaw, not to the sum of the differences in both jaws. Contact with the contralateral incisor in the opposite jaw slowed the eruption of an incisor more than contact with the ipsilateral incisor.  (+info)

Pathological evaluation of the effects of intentional disocclusion and overloading occlusion in odontogenesis disorders in N-methylnitrosourea-treated hamsters. (7/1014)

This study compares the effects of disocclusion and overloading occlusion on dental lesions. Ten-day-old Syrian hamsters were divided into 4 groups: group I, untreated animals; group II, animals whose hemilateral incisors were disoccluded; group III, N-methylnitrosourea (MNU)-treated animals; and group IV, MNU-treated animals whose hemilateral incisors were disoccluded. The ipsilateral maxillary and mandibular incisors were repetitively cut with diamond discs. The hamster is easier to anesthetize. Animals received a 0.2% solution of MNU (10 mg/kg body weight) intragastrically twice a week for 16 wk. All the cut mandibular incisors and the MNU-treated uncut mandibular incisors showed lack of iron deposition on the enamel surface. The eruption rate was significantly higher in the cut disoccluded incisors of groups II and IV (p < 0.05) and significantly lower in the uncut overloaded incisors of groups II and IV (p < 0.05). In the cut mandibular incisors of group IV, the degree of the disturbance of odontogenesis and the atypical proliferation of odontogenic epithelium were more prominent (p < 0.02), and the dental lesions occurred earlier. Histologically, the disturbed Hertwig's epithelial sheath and the Hertwig's epithelial sheath-like transformed U-shaped part and enamel organ seemed to lead to disturbances of amelogenesis and detinogenesis as well as to atypical proliferation of odontogenic epithelium nests. Thus, this method of disocclusion of the incisors of rodents may represent a useful model for the investigation of the effects of various agents on tooth formation over a short experimental period.  (+info)

Postnatal expression of calretinin-immunoreactivity in periodontal Ruffini endings in the rat incisor: a comparison with protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5)-immunoreactivity. (8/1014)

The postnatal expression of immunoreactivity for calretinin, one of the calcium binding proteins, and for protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), a general neuronal marker, was investigated in mechanoreceptive Ruffini endings in the periodontal ligament of the rat incisor. Age-related changes in the expression of these two proteins in periodontal nerves were further quantified with a computerized image analysis. At 1 day after birth, a few PGP 9.5-immunoreactive nerve fibers and a still smaller number of calretinin-positive fibers were found in the periodontal ligament: they were thin and beaded in appearance and no specialized nerve terminals were recognized. Tree-like terminals, reminiscent of immature Ruffini endings, were recognizable in 4-day-old rats by PGP 9.5-immunohistochemistry, while calretinin-immunostaining failed to reveal these specialized endings. At postnatal 7-11 days when PGP 9.5-immunostaining could demonstrate typical Ruffini endings, calretinin-immunopositive nerve fibers merely tapered off without forming the Ruffini type endings. A small number of Ruffini endings showing calretinin-immunoreactivity began to occur in the periodontal ligament at 24-26 days after birth when the occlusion of the first molars had been established. At the functional occlusion stage (60-80 days after birth), the Ruffini endings showing calretinin-immunoreactivity drastically increased in number and density, but less so than those positive for PGP 9.5-immunoreaction. The delayed expression of calretinin suggests that the function of the periodontal Ruffini endings is established after the completion of terminal formation because Ca2+, which binds to calcium binding proteins including calretinin with high affinity, plays an important role in mechano-electric transduction.  (+info)