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(1/7113) T-cell development: a new marker of differentiation state.

Differentiation of T cells is a complicated affair and there has been a dearth of markers that faithfully reflect thymocyte phenotype. A new strategy based on T-cell receptor gene sequencing has revealed a marker that can be used to monitor thymocyte differentiation with fidelity and without perturbation.  (+info)

(2/7113) Bone marrow and peripheral blood dendritic cells from patients with multiple myeloma are phenotypically and functionally normal despite the detection of Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus gene sequences.

Multiple myeloma (MM) cells express idiotypic proteins and other tumor-associated antigens which make them ideal targets for novel immunotherapeutic approaches. However, recent reports show the presence of Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) gene sequences in bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs) in MM, raising concerns regarding their antigen-presenting cell (APC) function. In the present study, we sought to identify the ideal source of DCs from MM patients for use in vaccination approaches. We compared the relative frequency, phenotype, and function of BMDCs or peripheral blood dendritic cells (PBDCs) from MM patients versus normal donors. DCs were derived by culture of mononuclear cells in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4. The yield as well as the pattern and intensity of Ag (HLA-DR, CD40, CD54, CD80, and CD86) expression were equivalent on DCs from BM or PB of MM patients versus normal donors. Comparison of PBDCs versus BMDCs showed higher surface expression of HLA-DR (P =.01), CD86 (P =. 0003), and CD14 (P =.04) on PBDCs. APC function, assessed using an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), demonstrated equivalent T-cell proliferation triggered by MM versus normal DCs. Moreover, no differences in APC function were noted in BMDCs compared with PBDCs. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of genomic DNA from both MM patient and normal donor DCs for the 233-bp KSHV gene sequence (KS330233) was negative, but nested PCR to yield a final product of 186 bp internal to KS330233 was positive in 16 of 18 (88.8%) MM BMDCs, 3 of 8 (37.5%) normal BMDCs, 1 of 5 (20%) MM PBDCs, and 2 of 6 (33.3%) normal donor PBDCs. Sequencing of 4 MM patient PCR products showed 96% to 98% homology to the published KSHV gene sequence, with patient specific mutations ruling out PCR artifacts or contamination. In addition, KHSV-specific viral cyclin D (open reading frame [ORF] 72) was amplified in 2 of 5 MM BMDCs, with sequencing of the ORF 72 amplicon revealing 91% and 92% homology to the KSHV viral cyclin D sequence. These sequences again demonstrated patient specific mutations, ruling out contamination. Therefore, our studies show that PB appears to be the preferred source of DCs for use in vaccination strategies due to the ready accessibility and phenotypic profile of PBDCs, as well as the comparable APC function and lower detection rate of KSHV gene sequences compared with BMDCs. Whether active KSHV infection is present and important in the pathophysiology of MM remains unclear; however, our study shows that MMDCs remain functional despite the detection of KSHV gene sequences.  (+info)

(3/7113) Modulation of VLA-4 and L-selectin expression on normal CD34+ cells during mobilization with G-CSF.

We have evaluated the immunophenotype, functional activity and clonogenic potential of CD34+ cells from peripheral blood (PB) of normal donors before and after 4 and 6 days of G-CSF administration. The percentage and absolute number of CD34+ cells significantly increased at days 4 and 6 of G-CSF administration, compared to the steady-state level (P < 0.0001). Two-colour fluorescence analysis showed, at days 4 and 6, a lower proportion of CD34+/c-kit+ compared to the steady-state level (P < 0.0001), but a similar expression of CD13, CD33, CD38, HLA-DR and Thy-1 antigens on CD34+ cells. The expression of adhesion molecules on CD34+ cells revealed a significant reduction of CD11a (P = 0.009), CD18, CD49d and CD62L (P < 0.0001) at days 4 and 6, compared to the baseline level. Three-colour staining showed a reduction of the more immature compartment (34+/DR-/13-) and an increase of the more differentiated compartment (34+/DR+/13+). Downregulation of VLA-4 during mobilisation was seen almost exclusively on more committed cells (34+/13+); downregulation of CD62L, on the contrary, was observed on both early progenitors (34+/13-) and more committed cells (34+/13+). The expression of 34+/VLA-4+ decreased on both c-kit+ and c-kit- cells, while the expression of 34+/62L+ decreased on the c-kit+ cells only. In vivo administration of G-CSF reduced the adherence capacity of CD34+ cells to normal BM stroma; in vitro incubation with SCF or IL-3 enhanced the expression of CD49d on CD34+ cells, while GM-CSF reduced the expression of CD62L. SCF was the only cytokine able to induce a significant increase of CD34+ cell adherence to preformed stroma. Pre-incubation with the blocking beta2 integrin monoclonal antibody caused a reduction of CD34+ cell adherence. In conclusion, the decrease of CD49d expression on mobilized CD34+ cells correlates with a poor adhesion to BM stroma; CD34+ cells incubated in vitro with SCF showed, conversely, a higher expression of CD49d and a greater adherence capacity on normal preformed stroma.  (+info)

(4/7113) Early ontogeny of monocytes and macrophages in the pig.

Prenatal development of cord blood monocytes and tissue macrophages was studied in pig foetuses by immunophenotyping and functional assays. The function of peripheral blood monocytes was compared in germ-free and conventional piglets. First macrophages were identified by electron microscopy in foetal liver on the 25th day of gestation. Monoclonal antibodies against porcine CD45 and SWC3 antigens were used for flow cytometric identification of myelomonocytic cells in cell suspensions prepared from the yolk sac, foetal liver, spleen and cord blood. Leukocytes expressing the common myelomonocytic antigen SWC3 were found in all organs studied since the earliest stages of development. Opsonized zymosan ingestion assay was used to determine the phagocytic capacity of foetal mononuclear phagocytes isolated from cord blood, liver and spleen. In the foetal liver, avid phagocytosis of apoptic cells had been found to occur before cells were able to ingest zymosan in vitro. The first cells capable of ingesting zymosan particles were found on the 40th day of gestation in umbilical blood and 17 days later in foetal spleen and liver. Their relative proportion increased with age. Cord blood monocytes and peripheral blood monocytes in germ-free piglets had low oxidatory burst activity as shown by iodonitrophenyl tetrazolium reduction assay. A remarkable increase of oxidatory burst activity was observed in conventional piglets, probably due to activation of immune mechanisms by the microflora colonizing gastrointestinal tract.  (+info)

(5/7113) Immunodeficiency due to a unique protracted developmental delay in the B-cell lineage.

A unique immune deficiency in a 24-month-old male characterized by a transient but protracted developmental delay in the B-cell lineage is reported. Significant deficiencies in the number of B cells in the blood, the concentrations of immunoglobulins in the serum, and the titers of antibodies to T-dependent and T-independent antigens resolved spontaneously by the age of 39 months in a sequence that duplicated the normal development of the B-cell lineage: blood B cells followed by immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgG, IgA, and specific IgG antibodies to T-independent antigens (pneumococcal polysaccharides). Because of the sequence of recovery, the disorder could have been confused with other defects in humoral immunity, depending on when in the course of disease immunologic studies were conducted. Investigations of X-chromosome polymorphisms suggested that the disorder was not X linked in that the mother appeared to have identical X chromosomes. An autosomal recessive disorder involving a gene that controls B-cell development and maturation seems more likely. In summary, this case appears to be a novel protracted delay in the development of the B-cell lineage, possibly due to an autosomal recessive genetic defect.  (+info)

(6/7113) Predictive value of CD19 measurements for bacterial infections in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

We investigated the predictive value of CD19 cell percentages (CD19%) for times to bacterial infections, using data from six pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocols and adjusting for other potentially prognostic variables, such as CD4%, CD8%, immunoglobulin (IgA) level, lymphocyte count, prior infections, prior zidovudine treatment, and age. In addition, we explored the combined effects of CD19% and IgG level in predicting time to infection. We found that a low CD19% is associated with a nonsignificant 1.2-fold increase in hazard of bacterial infection (95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.49). In contrast, a high IgG level is associated with a nonsignificant 0.87-fold decrease in hazard of infection (95% confidence interval: 0.68, 1.12). CD4% was more prognostic of time to bacterial infection than CD19% or IgG level. Low CD19% and high IgG levels together lead to a significant (P < 0. 01) 0.50-fold decrease in hazard (95% confidence interval: 0.35, 0. 73) relative to low CD19% and low IgG levels. Similarly, in a model involving assay result changes (from baseline to 6 months) as well as baseline values, the effect of CD19% by itself is reversed from its effect in conjunction with IgG. In this model, CD19% that are increasing and high are associated with decreases in hazard of infection (P < 0.01), while increasing CD19% and increasing IgG levels are associated with significant (at the P = 0.01 level) fourfold increases in hazard of infection relative to stable CD19% and decreasing, stable, or increasing IgG levels. Our data suggest that CD19%, in conjunction with IgG level, provides a useful prognostic tool for bacterial infections. It is highly likely that T-helper function impacts on B-cell function; thus, inclusion of CD4% in such analyses may greatly enhance the assessment of risk for bacterial infection.  (+info)

(7/7113) Immunohistochemical analysis of arterial wall cellular infiltration in Buerger's disease (endarteritis obliterans).

PURPOSE: The diagnosis of Buerger's disease has depended on clinical symptoms and angiographic findings, whereas pathologic findings are considered to be of secondary importance. Arteries from patients with Buerger's tissue were analyzed histologically, including immunophenotyping of the infiltrating cells, to elucidate the nature of Buerger's disease as a vasculitis. METHODS: Thirty-three specimens from nine patients, in whom Buerger's disease was diagnosed on the basis of our clinical and angiographic criteria between 1980 and 1995 at Nagoya University Hospital, were studied. Immunohistochemical studies were performed on paraffin-embedded tissue with a labeled streptoavidin-biotin method. RESULTS: The general architecture of vessel walls was well preserved regardless of the stage of disease, and cell infiltration was observed mainly in the thrombus and the intima. Among infiltrating cells, CD3(+) T cells greatly outnumbered CD20(+) B cells. CD68(+) macrophages or S-100(+) dendritic cells were detected, especially in the intima during acute and subacute stages. All cases except one showed infiltration by the human leukocyte antigen-D region (HLA-DR) antigen-bearing macrophages and dendritic cells in the intima. Immunoglobulins G, A, and M (IgG, IgA, IgM) and complement factors 3d and 4c (C3d, C4c) were deposited along the internal elastic lamina. CONCLUSION: Buerger's disease is strictly an endarteritis that is introduced by T-cell mediated cellular immunity and by B-cell mediated humoral immunity associated with activation of macrophages or dendritic cells in the intima.  (+info)

(8/7113) Detection of small numbers of immature cells in the blood of healthy subjects.

AIMS: To determine the frequency of immature haemopoietic cells in the peripheral blood of healthy persons. METHODS: Cytocentrifuge preparations were made using mononuclear leucocytes separated by a Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient. The slides were stained by May-Grunwald-Giemsa. The combination with immunoperoxidase technique allowed immunotyping of uncommon blood cells. RESULTS: Blast cells expressing the progenitor cell marker CD34 represented 0.11 (0.06) per cent (mean (SD)) of the total mononuclear leucocyte count; these were the haemopoietic progenitor cells in the peripheral blood. Dark blue cells expressing CD38, CD45, HLA-DR, CD4, CD11a, CD29, CD49d, CD50, and CD54 represented 0.30 (0.21) per cent of the mononuclear leucocytes; most of these cells did not express T, B, NK, myelomonocytic, progenitor cell, proliferation, activation, blood dendritic cell, or follicular dendritic cell markers. These were dendritic cell precursors in the peripheral blood. Very small numbers of cells expressing CD83 were found. Blast-like cells expressing CD45, HLA-DR, CD11a, and CD50 represented 0.15 (0.10) per cent of the mononuclear leucocytes; morphology and immunotyping supported the conclusion that these cells were poorly differentiated monocytes. CONCLUSIONS: Morphological investigation of mononuclear leucocytes in peripheral blood of healthy persons can be used to detect small numbers of blasts, dark blue cells, and blast-like cells. The immunoperoxidase technique can then be used for immunotyping of these cells. This simple method may be helpful in diagnosing haematological disorders.  (+info)