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(1/1889) Clusters of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia: analysis of person-to-person transmission by genotyping.

Genotyping at the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear rRNA operon was performed on isolates of P. carinii sp. f. hominis from three clusters of P. carinii pneumonia among eight patients with haematological malignancies and six with HIV infection. Nine different ITS sequence types of P. carinii sp. f. hominis were identified in the samples from the patients with haematological malignancies, suggesting that this cluster of cases of P. carinii pneumonia was unlikely to have resulted from nosocomial transmission. A common ITS sequence type was observed in two of the patients with haematological malignancies who shared a hospital room, and also in two of the patients with HIV infection who had prolonged close contact on the ward. In contrast, different ITS sequence types were detected in samples from an HIV-infected homosexual couple who shared the same household. These data suggest that person-to-person transmission of P. carinii sp. f. hominis may occur from infected to susceptible immunosuppressed patients with close contact within hospital environments. However direct transmission between patients did not account for the majority of cases within the clusters, suggesting that person-to-person transmission of P. carinii sp. f. hominis infection may be a relatively infrequent event and does not constitute the major route of transmission in man.  (+info)

(2/1889) TEL/PDGFbetaR induces hematologic malignancies in mice that respond to a specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

The TEL/PDGFbetaR fusion protein is expressed as the consequence of a recurring t(5;12) translocation associated with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Unlike other activated protein tyrosine kinases associated with hematopoietic malignancies, TEL/PDGFbetaR is invariably associated with a myeloid leukemia phenotype in humans. To test the transforming properties of TEL/PDGFbetaR in vivo, and to analyze the basis for myeloid lineage specificity in humans, we constructed transgenic mice with TEL/PDGFbetaR expression driven by a lymphoid-specific immunoglobulin enhancer-promoter cassette. These mice developed lymphoblastic lymphomas of both T and B lineage, demonstrating that TEL/PDGFbetaR is a transforming protein in vivo, and that the transforming ability of this fusion is not inherently restricted to the myeloid lineage. Treatment of TEL/PDGFbetaR transgenic animals with a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor with in vitro activity against PDGFbetaR (CGP57148) resulted in suppression of disease and a prolongation of survival. A therapeutic benefit was apparent both in animals treated before the development of overt clonal disease and in animals transplanted with clonal tumor cells. These results suggest that small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be effective treatment for activated tyrosine kinase-mediated malignancies both early in the course of disease and after the development of additional transforming mutations.  (+info)

(3/1889) The minimum CD34 threshold depends on prior chemotherapy in autologous peripheral blood stem cell recipients.

We analysed 57 patients with non-myeloid malignancies who received a non-purged autologous PBSCT. All had similar mobilisation and conditioning regimens. A high prior chemotherapy score and the number of chemotherapy lines used (P = 0.015 and P = 0.01, respectively) were adverse predictors of CD34 cell yields. Lower CD34 values (P = 0.002) were seen in patients treated with potent stem cell toxins (BCNU, melphalan, CCNU and mustine), designated toxicity factor 4 agents (TF4). All patients infused with grafts containing CD34 cell doses between 1.0 and 2.0 x 10(6)/kg (range 1.25-1.90) engrafted by day 51. The only variable associated with slow platelet recovery was exposure to TF4 (P = 0.007). The majority of patients with CD34 >1.0 x 10(6)/kg achieved rapid and sustained engraftment and the only predictive factor of delayed recovery is prior exposure to stem cell toxins. Potential PBSCT candidates should if possible avoid first line and salvage chemotherapy containing TF4 drugs. We therefore advocate a minimum CD34 threshold of >1.0 x 10(6)/kg in patients without extensive prior chemoradiotherapy, and > or = 2.0 x 10(6)/kg in all other patients.  (+info)

(4/1889) Central venous catheter exchange by guidewire for treatment of catheter-related bacteraemia in patients undergoing BMT or intensive chemotherapy.

Current guidelines for the treatment of catheter-related bacteraemia (CRB) advise against central venous catheter (CVC) exchange because of the potential risk of prolonging infection. However, there are no consistent data proving this recommendation. We evaluated prospectively the usefulness of CVC exchange by guidewire for the treatment of CRB in patients undergoing BMT or intensive chemotherapy. CVC exchange was considered when fever and positive blood cultures persisted after 2 days of adequate antimicrobial therapy and no potential source of bacteraemia other than CVC could be identified. The guidewire exchange was preceded and followed by a slow infusion of adequate antimicrobial therapy. Bacteraemia was confirmed as catheter-related by demonstrating concordance between isolates from the tip and blood cultures by pulsed-field electrophoresis of genomic DNA. This procedure was performed in 19 episodes of bacteraemia during a 1-year period. Fourteen episodes (74%) were catheter-related and 71% of these were due to coagulase-negative staphylococci. Guidewire replacement was accomplished uneventfully 4 days after development of sepsis (range 3-6). In all cases, clinical signs of sepsis disappeared in less than 24 h after replacement. Definitive catheter withdrawal was carried out a median of 16 days (range 3-42) after guidewire exchange; in all cases, the tip culture was negative. We conclude that CVC replacement by guidewire under adequate antimicrobial therapy may be a reasonable option for the treatment of CRB when antimicrobial therapy alone has been unsuccessful.  (+info)

(5/1889) Itraconazole oral solution as prophylaxis for fungal infections in neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter trial. GIMEMA Infection Program. Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell' Adulto.

To evaluate the efficacy and safety of itraconazole oral solution for preventing fungal infections, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter trial was conducted: 405 neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies were randomly assigned to receive either itraconazole, 2.5 mg/kg every 12 hours (201 patients), or placebo (204 patients). Proven and suspected deep fungal infection occurred in 24% of itraconazole recipients and in 33% of placebo recipients, a difference of 9 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.6% to 22.5%; P = .035). Fungemia due to Candida species was documented in 0.5% of itraconazole recipients and in 4% of placebo recipients, a difference of 3.5 percentage points (95% CI, 0.5% to 6%; P = .01). Deaths due to candidemia occurred in none of the itraconazole recipients compared with 4 placebo recipients, a difference of 2 percentage points (95% CI, 0.05% to 4%; P = .06). Aspergillus infection was documented in four itraconazole recipients (one death) and one placebo recipient (one death). Side effects causing drug interruption occurred in 18% of itraconazole recipients and 13% of placebo recipients. Itraconazole oral solution was well-tolerated and effectively prevented proven and suspected deep fungal infection as well as systemic infection and death due to Candida species.  (+info)

(6/1889) Possible carcinogenic effects of X-rays in a transgenerational study with CBA mice.

A lifetime experiment using 4279 CBA/J mice was carried out to investigate whether the pre-conceptual exposure of sperm cells to X-ray radiation or urethane would result in an increased cancer risk in the untreated progeny, and/or increased susceptibility to cancer following exposure to a promoting agent. The study consisted of four main groups, namely a control group (saline), a urethane group (1 mg/g body wt) and two X-ray radiation groups (1 Gy, 2 Gy). At 1, 3 and 9 weeks after treatment, the males of these four parental groups were mated with untreated virgin females. The offspring of each parental group was divided into two subgroups: one received s.c. urethane (0.1 mg/g body wt once) as a promoter, the other saline, at the age of 6 weeks. All animals were evaluated for the occurrence of tumours. K-ras oncogene and p53 tumour suppressor gene mutations were investigated in frozen lung tumour samples. The female offspring of male parents exposed to X-rays 1 week before their mating showed a trend towards a higher tumour incidence of the haematopoietic system than the F1 controls. In addition, a higher percentage of bronchioloalveolar adenocarcinomas in male offspring born to irradiated paternals mated 1 week after X-ray treatment points to a plausible increased sensitivity of post-meiotic germ cell stages towards transgenerational carcinogenic effects. On the other hand, no increased tumour incidence and malignancy were observed in the offspring born to irradiated paternals mated 3 and 9 weeks after X-ray treatment. Paternal urethane treatment 1, 3 and 9 weeks prior to conception did not result in significantly altered incidence or malignancy of tumours of the lung, liver and haematopoietic tissue in the offspring. K-ras mutations increased during tumour progression from bronchioloalveolar hyperplasia to adenoma. Codon 61 K-ras mutations were more frequent in lung tumours of urethane-promoted progeny from irradiated parents than from control parents. P53 mutations were absent from these lung alterations.  (+info)

(7/1889) Human herpesvirus 8 in hematologic diseases.

Human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a new member of the g-herpesvirus family. It is an unusual herpesvirus in that it carries a large number of genes that encode oncoproteins or cell signaling proteins. In addition to being the causative agent of both HIV-associated and non-HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma this DNA tumor virus has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases. These include multiple myeloma (MM), Waldenstom's macroglobulinemia (WM), multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD), body cavity-based lymphoma (BCBL), and various other conditions such as sarcoidosis and pemphigus. While the causative role of the viral infection is fairly certain in the development of BCBL and multicentric Castleman's disease, HHV-8 may act through a different mechanism to induce plasma cell malignancies. It has been suggested though the finding is still controversial - that infection of bone marrow stromal dendritic cells by HHV-8 might be a key factor in the etiology and pathogenesis of monoclonal gammopathies. The aim of this review is to provide a short introduction into the tumorigenic potential of HHV-8 as well as to detail the available data and possible mechanisms on the involvement of this virus in different hematologic diseases.  (+info)

(8/1889) Ultrasound B-mode changes in the uterus and ovaries and Doppler changes in the uterus after total body irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in childhood.

Internal genitalia and uterine blood flow were assessed by ultrasound in 12 females 4.0-10.9 years after total body irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for childhood leukaemia or lymphoma. Median age of the participants was 12.7 years (range 6.1-17.6) at bone marrow transplantation and 21.5 years (11.6-25.6) at the follow-up study. At follow-up all had entered puberty and 11/12 females had experienced the menarche. Eight females received sex steroid replacement therapy, three had spontaneous pubertal development and one woman experienced symptoms of estrogen deficiency. Median uterine and ovarian volumes were significantly reduced to -2.6 standard deviation scores (SDS) (-6.3 to -0.6), P = 0.002, and -2.6 SDS (-4.8 to -0.5), P = 0.002, respectively, compared with normal controls. Follicles were only detectable in two individuals. Uterine blood flow was impaired, as a systolic blood flow could be measured in 6/9 individuals, and a diastolic blood flow in 1/9 females. Our results indicate that the prescribed dosage of hormone replacement therapy, which was sufficient to induce bleeding and suppress other stigmata of premature menopause, was inadequate to generate normal uterine growth. In order to achieve uterine growth higher doses of hormone replacement therapy may be required. Our results confirm pelvic ultrasound as a reliable tool for investigation of internal female genitalia; however, in an infertility setting further tests are indicated.  (+info)