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(1/299) An audit of the care of diabetics in a group practice.

The diabetics in a general practice of 20,175 patients were identified during one year and 119 were found-a prevalence of 5.9 per thousand.The age and sex distribution, method of treatment, criteria of diabetic control, complications, and present method of care were analysed from the medical records to examine the process of medical care of a chronic disease in general practice.  (+info)

(2/299) Satisfaction with obstetric care. Patient survey in a family practice shared-call group.

OBJECTIVE: To examine patients' satisfaction with their obstetric care in a family medicine shared-call group. DESIGN: A survey was given to a convenience sample of patients who came to see their doctors over a 6-week period. SETTING: Brameast Family Practice in Brampton, Ont, where eight doctors participate in a shared obstetrics call group with 16 other physicians, each taking call 1 day in 23 days. PARTICIPANTS: Mothers in the practice who had delivered in the previous 8 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic data, interventions during delivery, and satisfaction ratings. RESULTS: Of the 70% of women who responded, 96% were delivered by a doctor other than their own. Eighty-eight percent of these women were satisfied with their medical care at delivery and 96% were satisfied with their prenatal care. Nearly 79% said they would choose this shared-call group again. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrated a high level of patient satisfaction with obstetric care, despite the fact that most patients were delivered by a doctor other than their own. Family practice groups sharing obstetric call offer a feasible alternative for physicians who wish to avoid the interference with lifestyle and office appointments that practising obstetrics usually entails.  (+info)

(3/299) Impact of an interest in asthma on prescribing costs in general practice.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect on total prescribing costs and prescribing costs for respiratory drugs for practices with at least one general practitioner with a special interest in asthma. DESIGN: Postal questionnaire survey. SETTING: General practitioners in England and Wales. SUBJECTS: 269 members of the General Practitioners in Asthma Group, of whom 103 agreed to participate. MAIN MEASURES: Individual practitioners' and their practices' PACT prescribing costs from the winter quarters of 1989-90 compared with average costs for their family health services authority (FHSA) and a notional national average of all FHSAs combined. RESULTS: The response rate was 57%; the average total prescribing costs for the practices of the 59 respondents were significantly lower than those of their respective FHSAs (mean difference 505 pounds per 1000 patients per quarter (95% confidence interval -934.0 to -76.2, p = 0.022) and lower than the national average. The average prescribing costs for respiratory drugs for the practices were significantly greater than those for their FHSA (195 pounds per 1000 patients per quarter (84.4 to 306.0, p = 0.001) and the national average. Both types of costs varied widely. CONCLUSION: An interest in asthma care in general practice is associated with higher average prescribing costs for respiratory drugs but no increase in overall prescribing costs compared with those for respective FHSAs and national averages. IMPLICATIONS: FHSAs and their medical advisors should not examine high prescribing costs for individual doctors or one therapeutic category but in the context of practice total costs.  (+info)

(4/299) Promoting audit in primary care: roles and relationships of medical audit advisory groups and their managers.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate perceptions of family health service authorities and medical audit advisory groups of advisory groups' involvement in clinical audit and wider quality issues; communication with the authorities; and manager satisfaction. DESIGN: National postal questionnaire survey in 1994. SETTING: All family health services authority districts in England and Wales. SUBJECTS: Chief executives or other responsible authority officers and advisory group chairpersons in each district. MAIN MEASURES: Priorities of advisory group and authority for audit; involvement of advisory group in wider quality issues; communication of information to, and contacts with, the authority and its involvement in planning the future work of the advisory group; and authorities' satisfaction. RESULTS: Both groups' views about audit were similar and broadly consistent with current policy. Advisory group involvement in wider quality issues was extensive, and the majority of both groups thought this appropriate. Much of the information about their activities collected by advisory groups was not passed on to the authority. The most frequent contact between the two groups was the advisory group's annual report, but formal personal contact was the most valued. Most authority respondents thought their views had been recognised in the advisory group's planning of future work; only a small minority were not satisfied with their advisory groups. Dissatisfied respondents received less information from their advisory groups, had less contact with them, and thought they had less input into their plans. There was some evidence that advisory groups in the "dissatisfied districts" were less involved in clinical audit and with their authorities in wider quality issues. CONCLUSIONS: Most advisory groups are developing their activities in clinical audit and have expanded their scope of work. The quality and availability of information about progress with audit is a cause for concern to both groups.  (+info)

(5/299) Effect of compensation method on the behavior of primary care physicians in managed care organizations: evidence from interviews with physicians and medical leaders in Washington State.

The perceived relationship between primary care physician compensation and utilization of medical services in medical groups affiliated with one or more among six managed care organizations in the state of Washington was examined. Representatives from 67 medical group practices completed a survey designed to determine the organizational arrangements and norms that influence primary care practice and to provide information on how groups translate the payments they receive from health plans into individual physician compensation. Semistructured interviews with 72 individual key informants from 31 of the 67 groups were conducted to ascertain how compensation method affects physician practice. A team of raters read the transcripts and identified key themes that emerged from the interviews. The themes generated from the key informant interviews fell into three broad categories. The first was self-selection and satisfaction. Compensation method was a key factor for physicians in deciding where to practice. Physicians' satisfaction with compensation method was high in part because they chose compensation methods that fit with their practice styles and lifestyles. Second, compensation drives production. Physician production, particularly the number of patients seen, was believed to be strongly influenced by compensation method, whereas utilization of ancillary services, patient outcomes, and satisfaction are seen as much less likely to be influenced. The third theme involved future changes in compensation methods. Medical leaders, administrators, and primary care physicians in several groups indicated that they expected changes in the current compensation methods in the near future in the direction of incentive-based methods. The responses revealed in interviews with physicians and administrative leaders underscored the critical role compensation arrangements play in driving physician satisfaction and behavior.  (+info)

(6/299) Economic outcomes associated with the use of risperidone in a naturalistic group practice setting.

The purpose of this cohort pilot study was to compare the resource utilization and economic outcomes associated with the use of risperidone versus haloperidol in a naturalistic setting. Patient charts from a large psychiatric group practice were reviewed, and hospital billing data were obtained. Patients meeting the inclusion criteria were placed into one of two cohorts depending on their medication history. Thirty patients treated with risperidone met the selection criteria, and a random quota sampling technique was used to allow for a matched control cohort of 30 patients treated with haloperidol. In the haloperidol and risperidone cohorts, 24 and 28 patients, respectively, were evaluated statistically. Mean utilization rates and costs per patient per month for each service were estimated by using regression analysis. Patients in the risperidone cohort had significantly fewer hospitalizations than did those in the haloperidol cohort (P = 0.004). Likewise, risperidone patients had significantly lower hospitalization costs than haloperidol patients (P = 0.005). Conversely, patients treated with risperidone visited the physician more frequently than did those treated with haloperidol (P = 0.0005). Estimated mean total monthly costs were $123.34 lower (95% confidence interval = $464, $217) per patient in the risperidone cohort than in the haloperidol cohort ($1,636.11 vs $1759.45; P = 0.4693). Significant reductions in hospital costs in the risperidone cohort offset higher medication and physician costs. Overall, total monthly costs were similar for the two cohorts.  (+info)

(7/299) Stop-loss insurance: are you tempting fate?

Capitation is a gamble, but stop-loss insurance can keep physician groups from losing their shirts. Who needs it? That depends on the type of contract and many other factors.  (+info)

(8/299) Quality of midwifery led care: assessing the effects of different models of continuity for women's satisfaction.

BACKGROUND: Changing Childbirth (1993), a report on the future of maternity services in the United Kingdom, endorsed the development of a primarily community based midwifery led service for normal pregnancy, with priority given to the provision of "woman centred care". This has led to the development of local schemes emphasising continuity of midwifery care and increased choice and control for women. AIMS: To compare two models of midwifery group practices (shared caseload and personal caseload) in terms of: (a) the extent to which women see the same midwife antenatally and know the delivery midwife, and (b) women's preference for continuity and satisfaction with their care. METHODS: A review of maternity case notes and survey of a cohort of women at 36 weeks of gestation and 2 weeks postpartum who attended the two midwifery group practices. Questionnaires were completed by 247 women antenatally (72% response) and 222 (68%) postnatally. Outcome measures were the level of continuity experienced during antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal care, women's preferences for continuity of carer, and ratings of satisfaction with care. RESULTS: The higher level of antenatal continuity of carer with personal caseload midwifery was associated with a lower percentage having previously met their main delivery midwife (60% v 74%). Women's preferences for antenatal continuity were significantly associated with their experiences. Postnatal rating of knowing the delivery midwife as "very important indeed" was associated with both previous antenatal ratings of its importance, and women's actual experiences. Personal continuity of carer was not a clear predictor of women's satisfaction with care. Of greater importance were women's expectations, their relations with midwives, communication, and involvement in decision making. CONCLUSIONS: Midwifery led schemes based on both shared and personal caseloads are acceptable to women. More important determinants of quality and women's satisfaction are the ethos of care consistency of care, good communication, and participation in decisions.  (+info)