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(1/9130) Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S is a biglutamic acid ADP-ribosyltransferase.

Kinetic analysis of two mutations within Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S (ExoS) showed that a E379D mutation inhibited expression of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity but had little effect on the expression of NAD glycohydrolase activity while a E381D mutation inhibited expression of both activities. These data identify ExoS as a biglutamic acid ADP-ribosyltransferase, where E381 is the catalytic residue and E379 contributes to the transfer of ADP-ribose to the target protein.  (+info)

(2/9130) Biochemical and electrophysiological studies on the mechanism of action of PNU-151774E, a novel antiepileptic compound.

PNU-151774E [(S)-(+)-2-(4-(3-fluorobenzyloxy)benzylamino)propanamide methanesulfonate], a new anticonvulsant that displays a wide therapeutic window, has a potency comparable or superior to that of most classic anticonvulsants. PNU-151774E is chemically unrelated to current antiepileptics. In animal seizure models it possesses a broad spectrum of action. In the present study, the action mechanism of PNU-151774E has been investigated using electrophysiological and biochemical assays. Binding studies performed with rat brain membranes show that PNU-151774E has high affinity for binding site 2 of the sodium channel receptor, which is greater than that of phenytoin or lamotrigine (IC50, 8 microM versus 47 and 185 microM, respectively). PNU-151774E reduces sustained repetitive firing in a use-dependent manner without modifying the first action potential in hippocampal cultured neurons. In the same preparation PNU-151774E inhibits tetrodotoxin-sensitive fast sodium currents and high voltage-activated calcium currents under voltage-clamp conditions. These electrophysiological activities of PNU-151774E correlate with its ability to inhibit veratrine and KCl-induced glutamate release in rat hippocampal slices (IC50, 56.4 and 185.5 microM, respectively) and calcium inward currents in mouse cortical neurons. On the other hand, PNU-151774E does not affect whole-cell gamma-aminobutryic acid- and glutamate-induced currents in cultured mouse cortical neurons. These results suggest that PNU-151774E exerts its anticonvulsant activity, at least in part, through inhibition of sodium and calcium channels, stabilizing neuronal membrane excitability and inhibiting transmitter release. The possible relevance of these pharmacological properties to its antiepileptic potential is discussed.  (+info)

(3/9130) Role of folylpolyglutamate synthetase and folylpolyglutamate hydrolase in methotrexate accumulation and polyglutamylation in childhood leukemia.

Inefficient polyglutamylation is a mechanism of resistance to methotrexate (MTX) in childhood T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in comparison with childhood c/preB-ALL. We analyzed the profile of MTX polyglutamylation in childhood c/preB-ALL, T-ALL, and AML (n = 45, 15, and 14, respectively), the activity of the MTX-polyglutamate synthesizing enzyme folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) (n = 39, 11, and 19, respectively) and of the MTX-polyglutamate breakdown enzyme folylpolyglutamate hydrolase (FPGH) (n = 98, 25, and 34, respectively). MTX-Glu4-6 accumulation after 24 hours exposure to 1 micromol/L [3H]-MTX in vitro was lower in T-ALL (threefold) and AML (fourfold) compared with c/preB-ALL (P +info)

(4/9130) Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors modulates the voltage-gated sustained calcium current in a teleost horizontal cell.

In the teleost retina, cone horizontal cells contain a voltage-activated sustained calcium current, which has been proposed to be involved in visual processing. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that modulation of voltage-gated channels can occur through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Because glutamate is the excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate retina, we have used whole cell electrophysiological techniques to examine the effect of mGluR activation on the sustained voltage-gated calcium current found in isolated cone horizontal cells in the catfish retina. In pharmacological conditions that blocked voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels, as well as N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA channels, application of L-glutamate or 1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD) to voltage-clamped cone horizontal cells acted to increase the amplitude of the calcium current, expand the activation range of the calcium current by 10 mV into the cell's physiological operating range, and shift the peak calcium current by -5 mV. To identify and characterize the mGluR subtypes found on catfish cone horizontal cells, agonists of group I, group II, or group III mGluRs were applied via perfusion. Group I and group III mGluR agonists mimicked the effect of L-glutamate or 1S,3R-ACPD, whereas group II mGluR agonists had no effect on L-type calcium current activity. Inhibition studies demonstrated that group I mGluR antagonists significantly blocked the modulatory effect of the group I mGluR agonist, (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine. Similar results were obtained when the group III mGluR agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, was applied in the presence of a group III mGluR antagonist. These results provide evidence for two groups of mGluR subtypes on catfish cone horizontal cells. Activation of these mGluRs is linked to modulation of the voltage-gated sustained calcium current.  (+info)

(5/9130) Antagonist activity of alpha-substituted 4-carboxyphenylglycine analogues at group I metabotropic glutamate receptors expressed in CHO cells.

1. We have investigated the antagonist properties of 6 alpha-substituted phenylglycine analogues based on the structure of 4-carboxyphenylglycine (4-CPG) for group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1alpha and mGlu5a) permanently expressed in CHO cells. 2. (S)-4-CPG and (S)-MCPG were the most selective mGlu1alpha receptor antagonists. Longer chain alpha-carbon substitutions resulted in a progressive loss of antagonist affinity at mGlu1alpha receptors but not at mGlu5a receptors. Thus mGlu1alpha receptor antagonists require small aliphatic groups at the alpha-position. Alpha-cyclopropyl-4-CPG showed a tendency towards mGlu5a selectivity, suggesting that bulky groups at this position may favour mGlu5a receptor antagonism. 3. We demonstrate that the mGlu5a receptor displays agonist-dependent antagonism. L-glutamate-induced Ca2+ release in mGlu5a receptor expressing cells was more susceptible to antagonism by cyclic alpha-carbon derivatives than (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-induced Ca2+ release in the same cell line. 4. The data presented suggests that mGlu1alpha and mGlu5a receptors have different steric and/or conformational requirements for the binding of antagonists and different amino acids which could interact with agonists. 5. These phenylglycine analogues could provide leads for the development of subtype selective antagonists.  (+info)

(6/9130) CPCCOEt, a noncompetitive metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 antagonist, inhibits receptor signaling without affecting glutamate binding.

Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are a family of G protein-coupled receptors characterized by a large, extracellular N-terminal domain comprising the glutamate-binding site. In the current study, we examined the pharmacological profile and site of action of the non-amino-acid antagonist 7-hydroxyiminocyclopropan[b]chromen-1a-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (CPCCOEt). CPCCOEt selectively inhibited glutamate-induced increases in intracellular calcium at human mGluR1b (hmGluR1b) with an apparent IC50 of 6.5 microM while having no agonist or antagonist activity at hmGluR2, -4a, -5a, -7b, and -8a up to 100 microM. Schild analysis indicated that CPCCOEt acts in a noncompetitive manner by decreasing the efficacy of glutamate-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis without affecting the EC50 value or Hill coefficient of glutamate. Similarly, CPCCOEt did not displace [3H]glutamate binding to membranes prepared from mGluR1a-expressing cells. To elucidate the site of action, we systematically exchanged segments and single amino acids between hmGluR1b and the related subtype, hmGluR5a. Substitution of Thr815 and Ala818, located at the extracellular surface of transmembrane segment VII, with the homologous amino acids of hmGluR5a eliminated CPCCOEt inhibition of hmGluR1b. In contrast, introduction of Thr815 and Ala818 at the homologous positions of hmGluR5a conferred complete inhibition by CPCCOEt (IC50 = 6.6 microM), i.e., a gain of function. These data suggest that CPCCOEt represents a novel class of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists inhibiting receptor signaling without affecting ligand binding. We propose that the interaction of CPCCOEt with Thr815 and Ala818 of mGluR1 disrupts receptor activation by inhibiting an intramolecular interaction between the agonist-bound extracellular domain and the transmembrane domain.  (+info)

(7/9130) Conformation-dependent inhibition of gastric H+,K+-ATPase by SCH 28080 demonstrated by mutagenesis of glutamic acid 820.

Gastric H+,K+-ATPase can be inhibited by imidazo pyridines like 2-methyl-8-[phenylmethoxy] imidazo-(1,2a) pyridine 3-acetonitrile (SCH 28080). The drug shows a high affinity for inhibition of K+-activated ATPase and for prevention of ATP phosphorylation. The inhibition by SCH 28080 can be explained by assuming that SCH 28080 binds to both the E2 and the phosphorylated intermediate (E2-P) forms of the enzyme. We observed recently that some mutants, in which glutamic acid 820 present in transmembrane domain six of the catalytic subunit had been replaced (E820Q, E820N, E820A), lost their K+-sensitivity and showed constitutive ATPase activity. This ATPase activity could be inhibited by similar SCH 28080 concentrations as the K+-activated ATPase of the wild-type enzyme. SCH 28080 also inhibited ATP phosphorylation at 21 degrees C of the mutants E820D, E820N, and E820A, although with varying efficacy and affinity. ATP-phosphorylation of mutant E820Q was not inhibited by SCH 28080; in contrast, the phosphorylation level at 21 degrees C was nearly doubled. These findings can be explained by assuming that mutation of Glu820 favors the E1 conformation in the order E820Q >E820A >E820N >wild-type = E820D. The increase in the phosphorylation level of the E820Q mutant can be explained by assuming that during the catalytic cycle the E2-P intermediate forms a complex with SCH 28080. This intermediate hydrolyzes considerably slower than E2-P and thus accumulates. The high tendency of the E820Q mutant for the E1 form is further supported by experiments showing that ATP phosphorylation of this mutant is rather insensitive towards vanadate, inorganic phosphate, and K+.  (+info)

(8/9130) Glutamate-, kainate- and NMDA-evoked membrane currents in identified glial cells in rat spinal cord slice.

The effect of L-glutamate, kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on membrane currents of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and their respective precursors was studied in acute spinal cord slices of rats between the ages of postnatal days 5 and 13 using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. L-glutamate (10(-3) M), kainate (10(-3) M), and NMDA (2x10(-3) M) evoked inward currents in all glial cells. Kainate evoked larger currents in precursors than in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, while NMDA induced larger currents in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes than in precursors. Kainate-evoked currents were blocked by the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist CNQX (10(-4) M) and were, with the exception of the precursors, larger in dorsal than in ventral horns, as were NMDA-evoked currents. Currents evoked by NMDA were unaffected by CNQX and, in contrast to those seen in neurones, were not sensitive to Mg2+. In addition, they significantly decreased during development and were present when synaptic transmission was blocked in a Ca2+-free solution. NMDA-evoked currents were not abolished during the block of K+ inward currents in glial cells by Ba2+; thus they are unlikely to be mediated by an increase in extracellular K+ during neuronal activity. We provide evidence that spinal cord glial cells are sensitive to the application of L-glutamate, kainate and transiently, during postnatal development, to NMDA.  (+info)