Epidemiology of the most common oral mucosal diseases in children. (1/18)

Dentists who treat children must be alert to the possibility of finding diseases of the oral mucosa, especially in younger children. The present study aimed to review the most updated information and the experience of our group in order to yield epidemiological data that assist diagnosis of the most common diseases of the oral mucosa in children. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown a wide variability in the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in different regions of the world and have led researchers to draw disparate conclusions. Moreover, studies have not been designed using standard criteria, further explaining the wide variability in the percentage of different groups of children with oral lesions, which ranges from 4.1 to 52.6%. The lesions most frequently considered by authors and that most often appear in the different studies are: recurrent aphthous stomatitis (0.9-10.8%), labial herpes (0.78-5.2%), fissured tongue (1.49-23%), geographic tongue (0.60-9.8%), oral candidiasis (0.01-37%) and traumatic injury (0.09%-22.15%). Dentists must be able to detect any of the numerous possible disorders and perform the correct differential diagnosis, key to the treatment plan. The aim of this paper, based on a review of the different national and international studies, is to contribute data on the most important oral mucosal diseases in the paediatric population in terms of prevalence and differential diagnosis.  (+info)

Craniofacial and dental findings in cystinosis. (2/18)

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Burden and viability of Borrelia burgdorferi in skin and joints of patients with erythema migrans or lyme arthritis. (3/18)

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Physical and dental manifestations of oral-facial-digital syndrome type I. (4/18)

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Post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome symptomatology and the impact on life functioning: is there something here? (5/18)

PURPOSE: A subset of patients treated for Lyme disease report persistent or recurrent symptoms of unknown etiology named post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). This study aims to describe a cohort of participants with early, untreated Lyme disease, and characterize post-treatment symptomatology and functional impact of PTLDS over time. METHODS: Sixty-three participants with erythema migrans and systemic symptoms were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Participants underwent physical exams and clinical assessments, and completed the SF-36 (daily life functioning) and the Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II) (depression), at each of five visits over a period of 6 months. RESULTS: Signs of Lyme disease disappeared post-treatment; however, new-onset patient-reported symptoms increased or plateaued over time. At 6 months, 36% of patients reported new-onset fatigue, 20% widespread pain, and 45% neurocognitive difficulties. However, less than 10% reported greater than "minimal" depression across the entire period. Those with PTLDS (36%) did not differ significantly from those without with respect to demographics, pre-treatment SF-36, and BDI-II scores. Statistically significant differences were found over time on the Role Physical, Vitality, Social Functioning, Role Emotional, and Mental Health subscales (with a trend toward significance for the remaining three subscales of Physical Functioning, Bodily Pain, and General Health) of the SF-36 between those with an eventual PTLDS diagnosis and those without when measured at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike clinical signs of Lyme disease, new-onset symptoms are reported by a subset of participants without evidence of depressive symptomatology. Patients who developed PTLDS had significantly lower life functioning compared to those without PTLDS. We propose future avenues for researching infection-triggered symptoms resulting from multiple mechanisms.  (+info)

Psoriasis and oral lesions: multicentric study of Oral Mucosa Diseases Italian Group (GIPMO). (6/18)

OBJECTIVE: This is a multicentric, observational and controlled study designed to verify the existence of a significant association between plaque-type psoriasis and oral lesions, such as geographic tongue and/or fissured tongue. STUDY DESIGN: during a period of 9 months all consecutive patients with plaque-type psoriasis were enrolled using simple nonrandom (sequential) sampling. The control group included healthy subjects presenting to the same Dermatology centers to monitor pigmented skin lesions; the patients were matched for age and sex. All patients were examined for oral lesions. RESULTS: Out of a total of 535 psoriatic patients and 436 control group patients, oral mucosal lesions were detected in 188 (35.1%) and 86 (19.7%) cases, respectively, and the difference is statistically significant. Fissured tongue (FT) and geographic tongue (GT), which were most frequently detected, were seen more frequently in psoriatic patients (FT: 22.6%; GT: 9.1%) than the control group (FT: 10.3%; GT: 5.2%) (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of the similar studies reported in the literature and the large number of patients involved in our study, we can conclude that FT and GT can be clearly suggested as oral manifestations of plaque-type psoriasis, although the reason for this association is not clear.  (+info)

Treatment of erythema migrans with doxycycline for 10 days versus 15 days. (7/18)

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Direct molecular detection and genotyping of Borrelia burgdorferi from whole blood of patients with early Lyme disease. (8/18)

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