Effects of carbon dioxide on growth of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, its ability to produce neurotoxin, and its transcriptome. (65/118)

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Wine oxidation and the role of cork. (66/118)

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Analysis of consumer complaints related to microbial contamination in soft drinks. (67/118)

Surveillance of consumer complaints related to microbial contamination in soft drinks indicated that tea drinks, and juice and juice drinks were major soft drinks involved in complaints. The frequency of complaints about juice and juice drinks is relatively high in relation to the production amount. Damage to containers during distribution and inappropriate storage of soft drinks by consumers are major causes of complaints. Molds were predominantly associated with complaints and symptoms caused by intake of contaminated soft drinks. To reduce complaints, more support for small companies, and greater education for carriers, dealers and consumers are needed.  (+info)

Linden flower (Tilia spp.) as potential vehicle of Clostridium botulinum spores in the transmission of infant botulism. (68/118)

Infant botulism is an intestinal toxemia caused principally by Clostridium botulinum. Since the infection occurs in the intestinal tract, numerous food products have been investigated for the presence of C. botulinum and its neurotoxins. In many countries, people use linden flower (Tilia spp) tea as a household remedy and give it to infants as a sedative. Therefore, to help provide a clear picture of this disease transmission, we investigated the presence of botulinum spores in linden flowers. In this study, we analyzed 100 samples of unwrapped linden flowers and 100 samples of linden flowers in tea bags to determine the prevalence and spore-load of C. botulinum. Results were analyzed by the Fisher test. We detected a prevalence of 3% of botulinum spores in the unwrapped linden flowers analyzed and a spore load of 30 spores per 100 grams. None of the industrialized linden flowers analyzed were contaminated with botulinum spores. C. botulinum type A was identified in two samples and type B in one sample. Linden flowers must be considered a potential vehicle of C. botulinum, and the ingestion of linden flower tea can represent a risk factor for infant botulism.  (+info)

Polyethylene terephthalate may yield endocrine disruptors. (69/118)

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Influence of licensed characters on children's taste and snack preferences. (70/118)

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Determination of six phthalic acid esters in orange juice packaged by PVC bottle using SPE and HPLC-UV: application to the migration study. (71/118)

A high-performance liquid chromatographic assay is described for the determination of six phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in orange juice packaged in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bottle. Samples were extracted by solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges and separated by a C(1)(8) column. The calibration curves were all linear with a correlation coefficient r > 0.9900. The limits of detection for the assay ranged from 2.6 to 13.8 ng/mL. Expressed as the within- and between-day coefficient of variation (CV), precision was 1.4-13.4% and 1.9-13.3%, respectively, and relative errors were 7.6-12.8% and -9.0-14.2%, respectively. The recovery ranged from 76.8 to 112.3% with the CV from 0.3 to 11.3%. The proposed methodology was applied for studing the migration of the selected PAEs into orange juice packaged in PVC bottle. Di-ethyl phthalate (DEP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were detected in the orange juice without the other four PAEs. Concentrations would increase with the storage time and reach up to 0.385 mug/mL and 0.662 mug/mL, respectively, when the expiration date arrived. The level of DEHP was about 110 times higher than the limiting one in drink water (6 ppb) regulated by U.S. EPA. Results suggest that PVC plasticized by DEHP should not be used as the packaging material for orange juice.  (+info)

The EDKB: an established knowledge base for endocrine disrupting chemicals. (72/118)

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