Nutritional and microbiological evaluations of chocolate-coated Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) fruit for commercial use. (57/118)

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Consumer testing of the acceptability and effectiveness of front-of-pack food labelling systems for the Australian grocery market. (58/118)

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Mercury bioavailability and bioaccumulation in estuarine food webs in the Gulf of Maine. (59/118)

Marine food webs are important links between Hg in the environment and human exposure via consumption of fish. Estuaries contain sediment repositories of Hg and are also critical habitat for marine fish and shellfish species consumed by humans. MeHg biotransfers from sites of production in estuarine sediments to higher trophic levels via both benthic and pelagic pathways. In this study, we investigated the potential for Hg biotransfer to estuarine food webs across a Hg contamination gradient in the Gulf of Maine. Despite the variation in sediment Hg concentrations across sites (>100 fold), Hg concentrations in biota ranged by only 2-4 fold for each species across sites. Sediment contamination alone explained some variation in Hg and MeHg concentrations in biota across sites. However, biogeochemical and ecological factors also explained significant variation in Hg bioaccumulation across species. Contaminated sites had higher total organic carbon concentrations in sediments, which related to a decrease in Hg bioaccumulation (measured as biota-sediment concentration factors). Moreover, concentrations of MeHg were higher in pelagic-feeding than benthic-feeding fauna (determined from delta13C), indicating the importance of pelagic pathways in transferring MeHg. Lastly, the proportion of total Hg as MeHg increased with trophic level (measured as delta15N). These results reveal the importance of both biogeochemical and ecological factors in determining the bioavailability and trophic transfer of MeHg in estuarine food webs.  (+info)

Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride feeding duration on crossbred beef semimembranosus steak color in aerobic or modified atmosphere packaging. (60/118)

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Do calorie-controlled portion sizes of snacks reduce energy intake? (61/118)

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Feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride to calf-fed Holsteins has minimal effects on semimembranosus steak color. (62/118)

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Do food provisions packaged in single-servings reduce energy intake at breakfast during a brief behavioral weight-loss intervention? (63/118)

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Botulism and hot-smoked whitefish: a family cluster of type E botulism in France, September 2009. (64/118)

A family cluster of three cases of type E botulism were identified in south-east France in September 2009. The suspected food source of infection was a vacuum packed hot-smoked whitefish of Canadian origin purchased by the family during a visit to Finland and consumed several weeks later in France on the day prior to symptom onset. No leftover fish was available to confirm this hypothesis. Vacuum packed hot-smoked whitefish has previously been associated with cases of type E botulism in multiple countries, including Finland, Germany, the United States and Israel.  (+info)