Zonula occludens toxin is a powerful mucosal adjuvant for intranasally delivered antigens. (1/3838)

Zonula occludens toxin (Zot) is produced by toxigenic strains of Vibrio cholerae and has the ability to reversibly alter intestinal epithelial tight junctions, allowing the passage of macromolecules through the mucosal barrier. In the present study, we investigated whether Zot could be exploited to deliver soluble antigens through the nasal mucosa for the induction of antigen-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. Intranasal immunization of mice with ovalbumin (Ova) and recombinant Zot, either fused to the maltose-binding protein (MBP-Zot) or with a hexahistidine tag (His-Zot), induced anti-Ova serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers that were approximately 40-fold higher than those induced by immunization with antigen alone. Interestingly, Zot also stimulated high anti-Ova IgA titers in serum, as well as in vaginal and intestinal secretions. A comparison with Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) revealed that the adjuvant activity of Zot was only sevenfold lower than that of LT. Moreover, Zot and LT induced similar patterns of Ova-specific IgG subclasses. The subtypes IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b were all stimulated, with a predominance of IgG1 and IgG2b. In conclusion, our results highlight Zot as a novel potent mucosal adjuvant of microbial origin.  (+info)

Correlation of temperature and toxicity in murine studies of staphylococcal enterotoxins and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1. (2/3838)

This study describes a quick (<12 h) assay for detecting temperature decreases in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice injected intraperitoneally (i.p. ) with staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), SEB, or SEC3 or toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 and a potentiating dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Toxin-specific antisera effectively neutralized the temperature fluctuations in this model. Orally administered SEA or SEB (50 microg/animal), with or without LPS, did not have an effect on temperature or lethality. Versus wild-type mice, transgenic knockout mice lacking the p55 receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or gamma interferon were protected against an i.p. challenge of SEA plus LPS. The p75 receptor for TNF and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 have a negligible role in this toxic shock model.  (+info)

Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by using monoclonal antibody for detection of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin. (3/3838)

Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the quantitative estimation of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies as capturing and detecting antibodies, respectively. The dose-dependent relationship between absorbance at 405 nm and concentration of purified CPE was obtained over the range of 0.64-400 ng/ml. The sandwich ELISA was fond to detect crude CPE in culture and CPE in 10% fecal extracts. This method is convenient, rapid and sensitive for specific detection of CPE.  (+info)

Ribotypes of clinical Vibrio cholerae non-O1 non-O139 strains in relation to O-serotypes. (4/3838)

The emergence of Vibrio cholerae O139 in 1992 and reports of an increasing number of other non-O1 serogroups being associated with diarrhoea, stimulated us to characterize V. cholerae non-O1 non-O139 strains received at the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan for serotyping. Ribotyping with the restriction enzyme BglI of 103 epidemiological unrelated mainly clinical strains representing 10 O-serotypes yielded 67 different typing patterns. Ribotype similarity within each serotype was compared by using the Dice coefficient (Sd) and different levels of homogeneity were observed (serotypes O5, O41 and O17, Sd between 82 and 90%: serotypes O13 and O141 Sd of 72; and O2, O6, O7, O11, O24 Sd of 62-66%). By cluster analysis, the strains were divided into several clusters of low similarity suggesting a high level of genetic diversity. A low degree of similarity between serotypes and ribotypes was found as strains within a specific serotypes often did not cluster but clustered with strains from other serotypes. However, epidemiological unrelated O5 strains showed identical or closely related ribotypes suggesting that these strains have undergone few genetic changes and may correspond to a clonal line. Surprisingly, 10 of 16 O141 strains studied contained a cholera toxin (CT) gene, including 7 strains recovered from stool and water samples in the United States. This is to our knowledge the first report of CT-positive clinical O141 strains. The closely related ribotypes shown by eight CT-positive strains is disturbing and suggest that these strains may be of a clonal origin and have the potential to cause cholera-like disease. Despite the low degree of correlation found between ribotypes and serotypes, both methods appears to be valuable techniques in studying the epidemiology of emerging serotypes of V. cholerae.  (+info)

T cell subsets in experimental lupus nephritis: modulation by bacterial superantigen. (5/3838)

Chronic graft-vs-host disease (GvH), induced by injection of DBA/2 lymphocytes into (C57BL/6 x DBA/2)F1 hybrids, is a murine model for lupus nephritis, associated with a Th2-dependent polyclonal B cell activation. The development of glomerulosclerosis in this model is preceded by a glomerular influx of LFA-1+ T cells. We investigated whether exposure to bacterial superantigen would modulate the course of this autoimmune syndrome. Injection of the bacterial superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in mice has been shown to induce the activation of TcRVbeta8+ T cells. Within 2 weeks after GvH induction, mice were injected twice with 20 microg of SEB and the following parameters were examined: cytokine and Ig profile, proteinuria and renal pathology. The second SEB injection induced in GvH mice an increased release of both interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) as compared with control F1 mice. No differences were observed in IL-2 production. SEB-treated GvH mice demonstrated a delayed onset of proteinuria. Histological analysis of the kidney showed that SEB-challenged GvH mice displayed significantly more interstitial inflammation and mesangial proliferation together with more IgG2a deposits in glomeruli than non-injected GvH mice. From these results, we conclude that GvH mice are more responsive to SEB in terms of cytokine production and that bacterial infection can modulate the course of this renal disease from a membranous to a more proliferative type of nephropathy.  (+info)

Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 regulates intestinal expression of the guanylin/heat-stable toxin receptor. (6/3838)

We have investigated the regulation of gene transcription in the intestine using the guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) gene as a model. GCC is expressed in crypts and villi in the small intestine and in crypts and surface epithelium of the colon. DNase I footprint, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), transient transfection assays, and mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that GCC transcription is regulated by a critical hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) binding site between bp -46 and -29 and that bp -38 to -36 were essential for binding. Binding of HNF-4 to the GCC promoter was confirmed by competition EMSA and by supershift EMSA. In Caco-2 and T84 cells, which express both GCC and HNF-4, the activity of GCC promoter and/or luciferase reporter plasmids containing 128 or 1973 bp of 5'-flanking sequence was dependent on the HNF-4 binding site in the proximal promoter. In COLO-DM cells, which express neither GCC nor HNF-4, cotransfection of GCC promoter/luciferase reporter plasmids with an HNF-4 expression vector resulted in 23-fold stimulation of the GCC promoter. Mutation of the HNF-4 binding site abolished this transactivation. Transfection of COLO-DM cells with the HNF-4 expression vector stimulated transcription of the endogenous GCC gene as well. These results indicate that HNF-4 is a key regulator of GCC expression in the intestine.  (+info)

Neurotensin is a proinflammatory neuropeptide in colonic inflammation. (7/3838)

The neuropeptide neurotensin mediates several intestinal functions, including chloride secretion, motility, and cellular growth. However, whether this peptide participates in intestinal inflammation is not known. Toxin A, an enterotoxin from Clostridium difficile, mediates pseudomembranous colitis in humans. In animal models, toxin A causes an acute inflammatory response characterized by activation of sensory neurons and intestinal nerves and immune cells of the lamina propria. Here we show that neurotensin and its receptor are elevated in the rat colonic mucosa following toxin A administration. Pretreatment of rats with the neurotensin receptor antagonist SR-48, 692 inhibits toxin A-induced changes in colonic secretion, mucosal permeability, and histologic damage. Exposure of colonic explants to toxin A or neurotensin causes mast cell degranulation, which is inhibited by SR-48,692. Because substance P was previously shown to mediate mast cell activation, we examined whether substance P is involved in neurotensin-induced mast cell degranulation. Our results show that neurotensin-induced mast cell degranulation in colonic explants is inhibited by the substance P (neurokinin-1) receptor antagonist CP-96,345, indicating that colonic mast activation in response to neurotensin involves release of substance P. We conclude that neurotensin plays a key role in the pathogenesis of C. difficile-induced colonic inflammation and mast cell activation.  (+info)

In vivo expression and immunoadjuvancy of a mutant of heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli in vaccine and vector strains of Vibrio cholerae. (8/3838)

Vibrio cholerae secretes cholera toxin (CT) and the closely related heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of Escherichia coli, the latter when expressed in V. cholerae. Both toxins are also potent immunoadjuvants. Mutant LT molecules that retain immunoadjuvant properties while possessing markedly diminished enterotoxic activities when expressed by E. coli have been developed. One such mutant LT molecule has the substitution of a glycine residue for arginine-192 [LT(R192G)]. Live attenuated strains of V. cholerae that have been used both as V. cholerae vaccines and as vectors for inducing mucosal and systemic immune responses directed against expressed heterologous antigens have been developed. In order to ascertain whether LT(R192G) can act as an immunoadjuvant when expressed in vivo by V. cholerae, we introduced a plasmid (pCS95) expressing this molecule into three vaccine strains of V. cholerae, Peru2, ETR3, and JRB14; the latter two strains contain genes encoding different heterologous antigens in the chromosome of the vaccine vectors. We found that LT(R192G) was expressed from pCS95 in vitro by both E. coli and V. cholerae strains but that LT(R192G) was detectable in the supernatant fraction of V. cholerae cultures only. In order to assess potential immunoadjuvanticity, groups of germfree mice were inoculated with the three V. cholerae vaccine strains alone and compared to groups inoculated with the V. cholerae vaccine strains supplemented with purified CT as an oral immunoadjuvant or V. cholerae vaccine strains expressing LT(R192G) from pCS95. We found that mice continued to pass stool containing V. cholerae strains with pCS95 for at least 4 days after oral inoculation, the last day evaluated. We found that inoculation with V. cholerae vaccine strains containing pCS95 resulted in anti-LT(R192G) immune responses, confirming in vivo expression. We were unable to detect immune responses directed against the heterologous antigens expressed at low levels in any group of animals, including animals that received purified CT as an immunoadjuvant. We were, however, able to measure increased vibriocidal immune responses against vaccine strains in animals that received V. cholerae vaccine strains expressing LT(R192G) from pCS95 compared to the responses in animals that received V. cholerae vaccine strains alone. These results demonstrate that mutant LT molecules can be expressed in vivo by attenuated vaccine strains of V. cholerae and that such expression can result in an immunoadjuvant effect.  (+info)