Loading...
(1/902) Distinct and combined vascular effects of ACE blockade and HMG-CoA reductase inhibition in hypertensive subjects.

Hypercholesterolemia and hypertension are frequently associated with elevated sympathetic activity. Both are independent cardiovascular risk factors and both affect endothelium-mediated vasodilation. To identify the effects of cholesterol-lowering and antihypertensive treatments on vascular reactivity and vasodilative capacity, we studied 30 hypercholesterolemic hypertensive subjects. They received placebo for 4 weeks, either enalapril or simvastatin for 14 weeks, and, finally, both medications for an additional 14 weeks. Postischemic forearm blood flow (MFBF) and minimal vascular resistance (mFVR) were used as indices of vasodilative capacity and structural vascular damage, respectively. Total (resting-stress-recovery phases) cardiovascular (blood pressure [BP] and heart rate [HR]) and regional hemodynamic (FBF and FVR) reactivity to stressful stimuli were calculated as area-under-the-curve (auc) (valuextime). Compared with baseline levels, simvastatin reduced total (TOT-C) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) (1.27 mmol/L, P<0.001 and 1.33 mmol/L, P<0.001, respectively). Enalapril also reduced TOT-C and LDL-C (0.6 mmol/L, P<0.001 and 0.58 mmol/L, P<0.05, respectively). MFBF was increased substantially by both treatments (P<0.001). Enalapril had a greater effect (-1.7 arbitrary units (AU), P<0.001) than simvastatin (-0.6 AU, P<0.05) on mFVR. During stress, FBF increased more with enalapril (4.4 FBFxminutes, P<0.001) than with simvastatin (1.8 FBFxminutes, P<0.01). Conversely, FVR stress response was reduced more with enalapril (9.1 FVRxminutes, P<0.001) than with simvastatin (2.9 FVRxminutes, P<0.01). During combination treatment, a significant (0.001>P<0.05) additive effect on hypercholesterolemia, structural vascular damage, BP, and FVR was shown. The findings suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition induces a larger reduction than HMG-CoA reductase blockade in vascular reactivity and structural damage in hypercholesterolemic hypertensive subjects.  (+info)

(2/902) Racial differences in the outcome of left ventricular dysfunction.

BACKGROUND: Population-based studies have found that black patients with congestive heart failure have a higher mortality rate than whites with the same condition. This finding has been attributed to differences in the severity, causes, and management of heart failure, the prevalence of coexisting conditions, and socioeconomic factors. Although these factors probably account for some of the higher mortality due to congestive heart failure among blacks, we hypothesized that racial differences in the natural history of left ventricular dysfunction might also have a role. METHODS: Using data from the Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) prevention and treatment trials, in which all patients received standardized therapy and follow-up, we conducted a retrospective analysis of the outcomes of asymptomatic and symptomatic left ventricular systolic dysfunction among black and white participants. The mean (+/-SD) follow-up was 34.2+/-14.0 months in the prevention trial and 32.3+/-14.8 months in the treatment trial among the black and white participants. RESULTS: The overall mortality rates in the prevention trial were 8.1 per 100 person-years for blacks and 5.1 per 100 person years for whites. In the treatment trial, the rates were 16.7 per 100 person-years and 13.4 per 100 person-years, respectively. After adjustment for age, coexisting conditions, severity and causes of heart failure, and use of medications, blacks had a higher risk of death from all causes in both the SOLVD prevention trial (relative risk, 1.36; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.06 to 1.74; P=0.02) and the treatment trial (relative risk, 1.25; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.50; P=0.02). In both trials blacks were also at higher risk for death due to pump failure and for the combined end point of death from any cause or hospitalization for heart failure, our two predefined indicators of the progression of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: Blacks with mild-to-moderate left ventricular systolic dysfunction appear to be at higher risk for progression of heart failure and death from any cause than similarly treated whites. These results suggest that there may be racial differences in the outcome of asymptomatic and symptomatic left ventricular systolic dysfunction.  (+info)

(3/902) Low-dose combination therapy as first-line hypertension treatment for blacks and nonblacks.

To assess the efficacy and safety of bisoprolol/6.25-mg hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), amlodipine, and enalapril in black and nonblack patients, data from two comparative studies were pooled and subgroup analyses performed. Both studies had similar designs and included all three active treatments. The second study also included a placebo group. Subjects (n = 541) with a sitting diastolic blood pressure of 95-114 mmHg were titrated to achieve a diastolic blood pressure < or = 90 mmHg. The studies included 114 blacks and 427 nonblacks. Results of an intention-to-treat analysis of mean change from baseline after 12 weeks of treatment showed the following: 1) blood pressure was significantly lowered by all three active drugs compared with baseline or placebo; 2) in blacks, bisoprolol/6.25-mg HCTZ resulted in significantly greater reductions of systolic and diastolic blood pressure than enalapril or placebo, but was not significantly different from amlodipine; 3) in nonblacks, bisoprolol/6.25-mg HCTZ resulted in significantly greater reduction of diastolic blood pressure than amlodipine, enalapril, or placebo. The placebo-corrected change in blood pressure was greater for blacks than whites on the bisoprolol/6.25-mg HCTZ combination, but this was not statistically significant. Bisoprolol/6.25-mg HCTZ controlled diastolic blood pressure to < or = 90 mmHg in significantly more patients than enalapril or placebo in blacks and nonblacks. The difference in control rates was not significant versus amlodipine. The incidence of drug-related adverse events was similar between treatments; however, bisoprolol/6.25-mg HCTZ had a lower discontinuation rate due to lack of blood pressure control or adverse experiences in both blacks and nonblacks.  (+info)

(4/902) ACE inhibition and ANG II receptor blockade improve glomerular size-selectivity in IgA nephropathy.

Protein trafficking across the glomerular capillary has a pathogenic role in subsequent renal damage. Despite evidence that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors improve glomerular size-selectivity, whether this effect is solely due to ANG II blocking or if other mediators also play a contributory role is not clear yet. We studied 20 proteinuric patients with IgA nephropathy, who received either enalapril (20 mg/day) or the ANG II receptor blocker irbesartan (100 mg/day) for 28 days in a randomized double-blind study. Measurements of blood pressure, renal hemodynamics, and fractional clearance of neutral dextran of graded sizes were performed before and after 28 days of treatment. Both enalapril and irbesartan significantly reduced blood pressure over baseline. This reduction reached the maximum effect 4-6 h after drug administration but did not last for the entire 24-h period. Despite transient antihypertensive effect, proteinuria was effectively reduced by both treatments to comparable extents. Neither enalapril nor irbesartan modified the sieving coefficients of small dextran molecules, but both effectively reduced transglomerular passage of large test macromolecules. Theoretical analysis of sieving coefficients showed that neither drug affected significantly the mean pore radius or the spread of the pore-size distribution, but both importantly and comparably reduced the importance of a nonselective shunt pathway. These data suggest that antagonism of ANG II is the key mechanism by which ACE inhibitors exert their beneficial effect on glomerular size-selective function and consequently on glomerular filtration and urinary output of plasma proteins.  (+info)

(5/902) Electrophysiologic effect of enalapril on guinea pig papillary muscles in vitro.

AIM: To study the direct effect of enalapril on cellular electrophysiology of myocardium. METHODS: Conventional microelectrodes technique was used to record the action potentials (AP) of guinea pig papillary muscles. RESULTS: Enalapril caused an increase of the AP amplitude (APA) and the resting potential (RP) in a concentration-dependent manner without any significant change of AP duration, Vmax and overshoot of AP. Superfusion of ouabain 0.5 mumol.L-1 reduced APA and RP, induced stable delayed after-depolarizations (DAD) at different basic cycle lengths (BCL) in a frequency-dependent manner. At BCL 200 ms, the amplitude of DAD was large enough to induce nonsustained triggered activity (TA). In additional presence of enalapril 10 mumol.L-1, the DAD amplitude at 500, 400, 300, and 200 ms were decreased from 5.3 +/- 2.3, 5.9 +/- 2.8, 7.4 +/- 2.1, and 8.9 +/- 1.3 to 2.6 +/- 0.7, 3.1 +/- 1.0, 3.7 +/- 1.5, and 5.3 +/- 1.1 (mV) respectively, all P < 0.01. The compensation intervals were increased in a similar frequency-dependent manner. The number of TA induced at BCL 200 ms was decreased from 3.6 +/- 0.7 to 0.8 +/- 0.2 (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Enalapril directly inhibits DAD and TA induced by ouabain through increasing RP and APA, which may contribute to its anti-arrhythmic effect.  (+info)

(6/902) Cough and angiotensin II receptor antagonists: cause or confounding?

AIMS: Cough is one of the most frequent side effects associated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) but is not thought to be associated with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist (ARA). This study compares reports of cough with losartan and three ACEIs used in general practice. METHODS: Studies have been conducted for losartan, and three ACEIs enalapril, lisinopril and perindopril, using the technique of Prescription-Event Monitoring. Patients were identified using dispensed prescription data. Questionnaires were sent to patients' general practitioners 6 months after the date of first prescription. Cases of cough within the first 60 days of treatment with losartan resulting in withdrawal of the drug were followed up with additional questionnaires. Incidence rates for reports of cough were calculated. In order to reduce the impact of carry-over effects, rate ratios were calculated for first reports of cough between days 8 and 60 using losartan as the index drug. RESULTS: The cohort for each drug exceeded 9000 patients. Age and sex distributions and indications for prescribing the four drugs were similar. Cough was the most frequent reason for discontinuation of losartan and the most frequently reported event in the first month of treatment with this drug. When reports of cough between days 1-7 were excluded, rates of cough were significantly higher for the three ACEIs when compared with losartan (rate ratios 1.5, 4.8 and 5.7, all P<0.03). 101 patients had discontinued losartan due to cough. 91% of these had previously been prescribed an ACEI and 86% had previously experienced ACEI cough. CONCLUSIONS: Carry-over accounted for the observed excess of reports of cough with losartan. Rates of cough between days 8 and 60 were significantly higher for the three ACEIs compared with losartan. Confounding factors associated with comparative observational cohort studies are discussed.  (+info)

(7/902) Protective effect of quinaprilat, an active metabolite of quinapril, on Ca2+-overload induced by lysophosphatidylcholine in isolated rat cardiomyocytes.

We examined the effects of quinaprilat, an active metabolite of quinapril (an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor) on the increase in intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) (Ca2+-overload) induced by lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) in isolated rat cardiomyocytes. LPC (15 microM) produced Ca2+-overload with a change in cell-shape from rod to round. Quinaprilat but not quinapril at 20 or 50 microM attenuated the LPC-induced increase in [Ca2+]i and the change in cell-shape in a concentration-dependent manner. Since quinaprilat has an inhibitory action on ACE and quinapril has practically no inhibitory action on ACE, it is likely that the inhibitory action of quinaprilat on ACE is necessary for the protective effect of the drug against LPC-induced changes. We therefore examined the effects of enalapril (another ACE inhibitor with the weak inhibitory action on ACE) and enalaprilat (an active metabolite of enalapril with an inhibitory action on ACE) on the LPC-induced changes. Both enalapril and enalaprilat attenuated the LPC-induced Ca2+-overload, suggesting that the inhibitory action on ACE may not mainly contribute to the protective effect of ACE inhibitors against LPC-induced Ca2+-overload. This suggestion was supported by the fact that neither ACE (0.2 U/ml) nor angiotensin II (0.1-100 microM) increased [Ca2+]i in isolated cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, application of bradykinin (0.01-10 microM) did not enhance the protective effect of quinaprilat against LPC-induced changes. LPC also increased release of creatine kinase (CK) from the myocyte markedly, and quinaprilat but not quinapril attenuated the LPC-induced CK release. Unexpectedly, both enalapril and enalaprilat did not attenuate the LPC-induced CK release. Neither quinapril nor quinaprilat changed the critical micelle concentration of LPC, suggesting that these drugs do not directly bind to LPC. We conclude that quinaprilat attenuates the LPC-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, and that the protective effect of quinaprilat on the LPC-induced change may not be related to a decrease in angiotensin II production or an increase in bradykinin production.  (+info)

(8/902) Beta-adrenergic blocking agent use and mortality in patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic left ventricular systolic dysfunction: a post hoc analysis of the Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction.

OBJECTIVES: This analysis was performed to assess whether beta-adrenergic blocking agent use is associated with reduced mortality in the Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) and to determine if this relationship is altered by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use. BACKGROUND: The ability of beta-blockers to alter mortality in patients with asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction is not well defined. Furthermore, the effect of beta-blocker use, in addition to an ACE inhibitor, on these patients has not been fully addressed. METHODS: This retrospective analysis evaluated the association of baseline beta-blocker use with mortality in 4,223 mostly asymptomatic Prevention trial patients, and 2,567 symptomatic Treatment trial patients. RESULTS: The 1,015 (24%) Prevention trial patients and 197 (8%) Treatment trial patients receiving beta-blockers had fewer symptoms, higher ejection fractions and different use of medications than patients not receiving beta-blockers. On univariate analysis, beta-blocker use was associated with significantly lower mortality than nonuse in both trials. Moreover, a synergistic reduction in mortality with use of both a beta-blocker and enalapril was suggested in the Prevention trial. After adjusting for important prognostic variables with Cox multivariate analysis, the association of beta-adrenergic blocking agent use with reduced mortality remained significant for Prevention trial patients receiving enalapril. Lower rates of arrhythmic and pump failure death and risk of death or hospitalization for heart failure were observed. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of a beta-blocker and enalapril was associated with a synergistic reduction in the risk of death in the SOLVD Prevention trial.  (+info)