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(1/1552) Opportunities for electronic health record data to support business functions in the pharmaceutical industry--a case study from Pfizer, Inc.

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(2/1552) Methodologic issues in health informatics trials: the complexities of complex interventions.

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(3/1552) Three years experience with the implementation of a networked electronic medical record in Haiti.

Since 2005 we have been developing and implementing an electronic medical record (EMR) that supports both individual and population health care of HIV-infected patients in Haiti. Unreliable electrical power and network infrastructure, cultural differences, variable levels of experience and computer literacy, and the geographic dispersion of the team remain challenges, but the system is now implemented in about 40 sites nationwide providing antiretroviral therapy, and includes records for about 18,600 patients. The need to support country-wide monitoring and evaluation drove early architectural decisions to support linking systems under conditions of network uncertainty. We have found surprising end user acceptance of the system, with the adoption of interactive EMR usage exceeding our expectations and timeline.  (+info)

(4/1552) Paperless protocoling of CT and MRI requests at an outpatient imaging center.

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(5/1552) Unified Modeling Language (UML) for hospital-based cancer registration processes.

OBJECTIVE: Hospital-based cancer registry involves complex processing steps that span across multiple departments. In addition, management techniques and registration procedures differ depending on each medical facility. Establishing processes for hospital-based cancer registry requires clarifying specific functions and labor needed. In recent years, the business modeling technique, in which management evaluation is done by clearly spelling out processes and functions, has been applied to business process analysis. However, there are few analytical reports describing the applications of these concepts to medical-related work. In this study, we initially sought to model hospital-based cancer registration processes using the Unified Modeling Language (UML), to clarify functions. METHODS: The object of this study was the cancer registry of Osaka University Hospital. We organized the hospital-based cancer registration processes based on interview and observational surveys, and produced an As-Is model using activity, use-case, and class diagrams. After drafting every UML model, it was fed-back to practitioners to check its validity and improved. RESULTS: We were able to define the workflow for each department using activity diagrams. In addition, by using use-case diagrams we were able to classify each department within the hospital as a system, and thereby specify the core processes and staff that were responsible for each department. The class diagrams were effective in systematically organizing the information to be used for hospital-based cancer registries. Using UML modeling, hospital-based cancer registration processes were broadly classified into three separate processes, namely, registration tasks, quality control, and filing data. An additional 14 functions were also extracted. Many tasks take place within the hospital-based cancer registry office, but the process of providing information spans across multiple departments. Moreover, additional tasks were required in comparison to using a standardized system because the hospital-based cancer registration system was constructed with the pre-existing computer system in Osaka University Hospital. Difficulty of utilization of useful information for cancer registration processes was shown to increase the task workload. CONCLUSION: By using UML, we were able to clarify functions and extract the typical processes for a hospital-based cancer registry. Modeling can provide a basis of process analysis for establishment of efficient hospital-based cancer registration processes in each institute.  (+info)

(6/1552) The Kaiser Permanente Electronic Health Record: transforming and streamlining modalities of care.

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(7/1552) If you build it, will they come? The Kaiser Permanente model of online health care.

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(8/1552) A tale of two large community electronic health record extension projects.

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