ATF-2-binding regulatory element is responsible for the Ly49A expression in murine T lymphoid line, EL-4. (1/3950)

To understand the mechanism of Ly49A-expression and its significance in T-cell differentiation, we analyzed the 5'-flanking region of the Ly49A gene in a search for the Ly49A-regulatory element. Since very few known regulatory elements have been found in this region, presumably a novel regulatory sequence(s) could exist. Accordingly, we defined the 13-bp regulatory element, 5'-ATGACGAGGAGGA-3', restricted to Ly49A-expression in EL-4 cells in comparison with two other representative cell lines tested. This element, designated as EL13, proved to be previously undiscovered by homology search and is highly homologous with several virus DNAs. Using EL13 as a probe we have cloned a cDNA encoding a binding protein to EL13. Its deduced nucleotide sequence revealed that EL13-binding protein is almost identical with rat ATF-2. Although ATF-2 is known to bind to cyclic AMP responsive element (CRE), EL13 shares five out of eight nucleotides with this consensus sequence. Our results suggested that ATF-2 may play an important role via binding to EL13 for the expression of Ly49A. These data will provide useful information for understanding T-cell and NK-cell differentiation in murine immune system.  (+info)

Differential regulation of Bcl-2, AP-1 and NF-kappaB on cardiomyocyte apoptosis during myocardial ischemic stress adaptation. (2/3950)

Acute ischemia followed by prolonged reperfusion has been shown to induce cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In this report, we demonstrate that myocardial adaptation to ischemia induced by repeated cyclic episodes of short-term ischemia each followed by another short duration of reperfusion reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and DNA fragmentation. This was associated with the induction of the expression of Bcl-2 mRNA and translocation and activation of NF-kappaB. Another transcription factor, AP-1, remained unaffected by repeated ischemia and reperfusion, but exhibited significant upregulation by a single episode of 30 min ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion. This activation of AP-1 was inhibited by a scavenger of oxygen free radicals, DMTU. Thirty minutes ischemia and 120 min reperfusion downregulated the induction of the expression of Bcl-2 mRNA, but moderately activated NF-kappaB binding activity. This was associated with an increased number of apoptotic cells and DNA fragmentation in cardiomyocytes which were attenuated by DMTU. The results of this study indicate that Bcl-2, AP-1 and NF-kappaB differentially regulate cardiomyocyte apoptosis mediated by acute ischemia and prolonged reperfusion.  (+info)

Involvement of tyrosine phosphorylation in HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor-induced cell death in L6 myoblasts. (3/3950)

Our previous studies have shown that the HMG-CoA reductase (HCR) inhibitor (HCRI), simvastatin, causes myopathy in rabbits and kills L6 myoblasts. The present study was designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HCRI-induced cell death. We have demonstrated that simvastatin induces the tyrosine phosphorylation of several cellular proteins within 10 min. These phosphorylations were followed by apoptosis, as evidenced by the occurrence of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and by morphological changes detected with Nomarski optics. Simvastatin-induced cell death was prevented by tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The MTT assay revealed that the addition of mevalonic acid into the culture medium partially inhibited simvastatin-induced cell death. Thus, these results suggested that protein tyrosine phosphorylation might play an important role in the intracellular signal transduction pathway mediating the HCRI-induced death of myoblasts.  (+info)

Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase C are required for the inhibition of caspase activity by epidermal growth factor. (4/3950)

The mechanism by which growth factors exert an anti-apoptotic function on many cell types is not well understood. This issue is addressed in relation to epidermal growth factor (EGF) which inhibits apoptosis induced by staurosporine or wortmannin in an epithelial tumour cell line (CNE-2). The presence of EGF substantially reduced the in vitro Ac-DEVD-AMC hydrolytic activity and almost completely suppressed the intracellular cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in staurosporine- or wortmannin-treated cells. Staurosporine but not wortmannin caused the intracellular proteolytic processing of pro-caspase-3 and this event was transiently inhibited by EGF. Staurosporine-induced apoptosis was not inhibited by EGF in the presence of wortmannin or LY294002. Similarly, EGF failed to inhibit wortmannin-induced apoptosis in the presence of staurosporine, chelerythrine chloride or Go6850. These results suggest that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase C play a role in the survival function of EGF but the reduction of cellular caspase activity cannot be satisfactorily explained by a lack of pro-caspase-3 activation.  (+info)

Pulsatile shear stress leads to DNA fragmentation in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. (5/3950)

1. Using an in vitro model of shear stress-induced cell injury we demonstrate that application of shear to differentiated human SH-SY5Y cells leads to cell death characterized by DNA fragmentation. Controlled shear stress was applied to cells via a modified cone and plate viscometer. 2. We show that pulsatile shear stress leads to DNA fragmentation, as determined via flow cytometry of fluorescein-12-dUTP nick-end labelled cells, in 45 +/- 4 % of cells. No lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was observed immediately after injury; however, 24 h after injury significant LDH release was observed. 3. Nitric oxide production by cells subjected to pulsatile shear increased two- to threefold over that in unsheared control cells. 4. Inhibition of protein synthesis, nitric oxide production, Ca2+ entry into cells, and pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein activation attenuated the shear stress-induced cell injury. 5. Our results show for the first time that application of pulsatile shear stress to a neuron-like cell in vitro leads to nitric oxide-dependent cell death.  (+info)

Stimulation of ultraviolet-induced apoptosis of human fibroblast UVr-1 cells by tyrosine kinase inhibitors. (6/3950)

Damnacanthal is an anthraquinone compound isolated from the root of Morinda citrifolia and was reported to have a potent inhibitory activity towards tyrosine kinases such as Lck, Src, Lyn and EGF receptor. In the present study, we have examined the effects of damnacanthal on ultraviolet ray-induced apoptosis in ultraviolet-resistant human UVr-1 cells. When the cells were treated with damnacanthal prior to ultraviolet irradiation, DNA fragmentation was more pronounced as compared to the case of ultraviolet irradiation alone. The other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, herbimycin A and genistein, also caused similar effects on ultraviolet-induced apoptosis but to a lesser extent. Serine/threonine kinase inhibitors, K252a, staurosporine and GF109203X, rather suppressed the ultraviolet-induced DNA cleavage. Immunoblot analysis showed that pretreatment with damnacanthal followed by ultraviolet irradiation increased the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases and stress-activated protein kinases. However, the other tyrosine kinase inhibitors did not increase the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases but stimulated phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinases. Consequently, the ultraviolet-induced concurrent increase in both phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases and stress-activated protein kinases after pretreatment with damnacanthal might be characteristically related to the stimulatory effect of damnacanthal on ultraviolet-induced apoptosis.  (+info)

Origin of DNA damage in ejaculated human spermatozoa. (7/3950)

The molecular basis of many forms of male infertility is poorly defined. One area of research that has been studied intensely is the integrity of the DNA in the nucleus of mature ejaculated spermatozoa. It has been shown that, in men with abnormal sperm parameters, the DNA is more likely to possess strand breaks. However, how and why this DNA damage originates in certain males and how it may influence the genetic project of a mature spermatozoon is unknown. Two theories have been proposed to describe the origin of this DNA damage in mature spermatozoa. The first arises from studies performed in animal models and is linked to the unique manner in which mammalian sperm chromatin is packaged, while the second attributes the nuclear DNA damage in mature spermatozoa to apoptosis. One of the factors implicated in sperm apoptosis is the cell surface protein, Fas. In this review, we discuss the possible origins of DNA damage in ejaculated human spermatozoa, how these spermatozoa arrive in the ejaculate of some men, and what consequences they may have if they succeed in their genetic project.  (+info)

Hormonal and genetic control of germ cell apoptosis in the testis. (8/3950)

Programmed cell death is an evolutionarily conserved cell death process that plays a major role during normal development and homeostasis. In many cases, the ordered execution of this internal death programme leads to typical morphological and biochemical changes that have been termed apoptosis. The crucial role of this mode of cell death in the pathogenesis of diverse human diseases including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, neurodegeneratives disorders, atherosclerosis and cardiomyopathy is now supported by a wealth of data. In adult mammals, including humans, germ cell death is conspicuous during normal spermatogenesis and plays a pivotal role in sperm output. Withdrawal of gonadotrophins and testosterone further enhances the degeneration of germ cells in the testis. The availability of a quantitative method for analysing the testicular DNA fragmentation and in situ methods to localize specific germ cells undergoing apoptosis, either spontaneously or in response to a variety of death triggering signals, opens new avenues in the understanding of the significance of germ cell apoptosis during normal and abnormal states of spermatogenesis. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that both spontaneous (during normal spermatogenesis) and accelerated germ cell death triggered by deprivation of the gonadotrophic support or moderately increased scrotal temperature in adult rats occur almost exclusively via apoptosis. Although there has been spectacular progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis in various systems other than spermatogenesis, elucidation of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which germ cell apoptosis is regulated has only just begun. It is likely that germ cell apoptosis is controlled in a cell-type specific fashion, but the basic elements of the death machinery may be universal. In addition, there is increasing evidence that homozygous disruption of a number of genes in mice results in infertility through accelerated germ cell apoptosis. Manipulation of spermatogenesis by survival factor(s) deprivation or increases in extrinsic death signals in loss-of-function or gain-of-function mouse models provides a basis for further attempts to define the intrinsic regulation of various death-related genes by external death signals. Such information is crucial for effective management of male factor infertility as well as more targeted approaches to male contraception.  (+info)