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(1/16781) Tissue-specific knockout of the insulin receptor in pancreatic beta cells creates an insulin secretory defect similar to that in type 2 diabetes.

Dysfunction of the pancreatic beta cell is an important defect in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, although its exact relationship to the insulin resistance is unclear. To determine whether insulin signaling has a functional role in the beta cell we have used the Cre-loxP system to specifically inactivate the insulin receptor gene in the beta cells. The resultant mice exhibit a selective loss of insulin secretion in response to glucose and a progressive impairment of glucose tolerance. These data indicate an important functional role for the insulin receptor in glucose sensing by the pancreatic beta cell and suggest that defects in insulin signaling at the level of the beta cell may contribute to the observed alterations in insulin secretion in type 2 diabetes.  (+info)

(2/16781) Glomerular size-selective dysfunction in NIDDM is not ameliorated by ACE inhibition or by calcium channel blockade.

BACKGROUND: In patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and overt nephropathy glomerular barrier size-selectivity progressively deteriorates with time and is effectively improved by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition. Whether similar glomerular functional changes develop in proteinuric patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), and whether antihypertensive agents can favorably affect glomerular filtration of macromolecules in these patients, has not been documented yet. METHODS: We investigated renal hemodynamics and fractional clearance of neutral dextrans of graded sizes, in nine proteinuric patients with NIDDM and renal biopsy findings of typical diabetic glomerulopathy. Six healthy volunteers served as controls. We also investigated the effects of an ACE inhibitor and of a calcium channel blocker, both given in doses targeted to achieve a comparable level of systemic blood pressure control, on glomerular hemodynamics and sieving function. Theoretical analysis of glomerular macromolecule transport was adopted to evaluate intrinsic glomerular membrane permeability properties. RESULTS: Fractional clearance of large macromolecules (42 to 66 A in radius) was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in controls, and the distribution of membrane pore radii was calculated to be shifted towards larger pore sizes in diabetics (mean radius increased from 55 to 60 A). Despite effective blood pressure control, neither antihypertensive affected glomerular hemodynamics to any significant extent. Fractional clearance of dextrans, as well as of albumin and IgG, and total urinary proteins were not modified by either treatments. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that patients with NIDDM and overt nephropathy develop abnormalities in size-selective function of the glomerular barrier and, at variance to IDDM, such changes were not ameliorated either by ACE inhibition or calcium channel blockade.  (+info)

(3/16781) Plasma total homocysteine and cysteine in relation to glomerular filtration rate in diabetes mellitus.

BACKGROUND: The plasma concentrations of total homocysteine (tHcy) and total cysteine (tCys) are determined by intracellular metabolism and by renal plasma clearance, and we hypothesized that glomerular filtration is a major determinant of plasma tHcy and tCys. We studied the relationships between the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and plasma tHcy and tCys in populations of diabetic patients with particularly wide ranges of GFR. METHODS: We measured GFR, urine albumin excretion rate (UAER), plasma tHcy, tCys, methionine, vitamin B12, folate, C-peptide, and routine parameters in 50 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and 30 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients. All patients underwent intensive insulin treatment and had a serum creatinine concentration below 115 micromol/liter. RESULTS: Mean plasma tHcy in diabetic patients (0.1 micromol/liter) was lower than in normal persons (11.1 micromol/liter, P = 0.0014). Mean plasma tCys in diabetic patients (266.1 micromol/liter) was also lower than in normal persons (281.9 micromol/liter, P = 0.0005). Seventy-three percent of the diabetic patients had relative hyperfiltration. Plasma tHcy and tCys were closely and independently associated with GFR, serum folate, and serum B12. However, plasma tHcy was not independently associated with any of the 22 other variables tested, including age, serum creatinine concentration, UAER, total daily insulin dose, and glycemic control. CONCLUSIONS: Glomerular filtration rate is an independent determinant of plasma tHcy and tCys concentrations, and GFR is rate limiting for renal clearance of both homocysteine and cysteine in diabetic patients without overt nephropathy. Declining GFR explains the age-related increase in plasma tHcy, and hyperfiltration explains the lower than normal mean plasma tHcy and tCys concentrations in populations of diabetic patients.  (+info)

(4/16781) Type 2 diabetes: evidence for linkage on chromosome 20 in 716 Finnish affected sib pairs.

We are conducting a genome scan at an average resolution of 10 centimorgans (cM) for type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes in 716 affected sib pairs from 477 Finnish families. To date, our best evidence for linkage is on chromosome 20 with potentially separable peaks located on both the long and short arms. The unweighted multipoint maximum logarithm of odds score (MLS) was 3.08 on 20p (location, chi = 19.5 cM) under an additive model, whereas the weighted MLS was 2.06 on 20q (chi = 57 cM, recurrence risk,lambda(s) = 1. 25, P = 0.009). Weighted logarithm of odds scores of 2.00 (chi = 69.5 cM, P = 0.010) and 1.92 (chi = 18.5 cM, P = 0.013) were also observed. Ordered subset analyses based on sibships with extreme mean values of diabetes-related quantitative traits yielded sets of families who contributed disproportionately to the peaks. Two-hour glucose levels in offspring of diabetic individuals gave a MLS of 2. 12 (P = 0.0018) at 9.5 cM. Evidence from this and other studies suggests at least two diabetes-susceptibility genes on chromosome 20. We have also screened the gene for maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1, hepatic nuclear factor 4-a (HNF-4alpha) in 64 affected sibships with evidence for high chromosomal sharing at its location on chromosome 20q. We found no evidence that sequence changes in this gene accounted for the linkage results we observed.  (+info)

(5/16781) Incidence of analgesic nephropathy in Berlin since 1983.

BACKGROUND: Phenacetin was removed from the German market in 1986 and was replaced mainly in analgesic compounds by acetaminophen. Our objective was to examine the effect of this measure on the incidence of analgesic nephropathy in light of the changes in other end-stage renal diseases. METHODS: We therefore compared the proportion of renal diseases in all patients starting dialysis treatment during three 18-month periods: 4/1982-9/1983 (n=57); 1/1991-6/1992 (n=81); and 10/1995-3/1997 (n=76). RESULTS: On the one hand, the proportion of end-stage analgesic nephropathy decreased significantly from 30% in 1981-1982 to 21% in 1991-1992 and 12% in 1995-1997 (P=0.01). On the other hand, type II diabetes increased significantly from 7% to 22% (P=0.01) and 29%, (P=0.001). Using the chi2 distribution test to analyze the frequencies of seven diseases at three different time intervals, however, showed that the changes in renal-disease proportions between 1982-1983, 1991-1992 and 1995-1997 were not significantly independent. There was a significant median age increase from 52 years (CI0.95 44-58) in 1982-1983 to 63 (CI0.95 55-67) in 1991-1992 and 63 (CI0.95 60-66) in 1995-1997 (P=0.003) for all patients starting dialysis but not for those with analgesic nephropathy [59 (55-71) vs 64 (53-67) and 61 (50-72); n.s.]. CONCLUSION: The decrease of end-stage analgesic nephropathy since 1983 may be partially due to the removal of phenacetin from the German market in 1986. However, considering the general increase in numbers of dialysis patients, their higher age and the increased incidence of type II diabetes, the decrease in analgesic nephropathy is not a statistically significant independent variable. Altered admittance policies for dialysis treatment have yielded a new pattern of renal-disease proportion which interferes with changes in the incidence of analgesic nephropathy.  (+info)

(6/16781) Abysmal prognosis of patients with type 2 diabetes entering dialysis.

INTRODUCTION: The importance of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type II diabetes) as a leading cause of end-stage renal disease is now widely recognized. The purpose of this study was to assess life-prognosis and its predictors in a cohort of patients newly entering dialysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty-four consecutive type II diabetes patients (40% of all patients) starting dialysis between 01/01/95 and 31/12/96 were studied retrospectively, focusing on clinical data at inception and life-prognosis after a mean follow-up of 211 days. Patients were divided into three groups, according to onset of renal failure: acute 11% (9/84), chronic 61% (51/84) and acutely aggravated chronic renal failure 28% (25/84). RESULTS: Patients (mean age 67 years) had long-standing diabetes (mean duration approximately 15 years), heavy proteinuria (approximately 3 g/24h) and diabetic retinopathy (67%). The average creatinine clearance (Cockcroft's formula) was 13 ml/min. Cardiovascular diseases were highly prevalent at the start of dialysis: history of myocardial infarction (26%), angina (36%) and acute left ventricular dysfunction (67%). More than 80% of the patients underwent the first session dialysis under emergency conditions, a situation in part related to late referral to the nephrology division (63% for chronic patients). A great majority of the patients were overhydrated when starting dialysis, as evidenced by the average weight loss of 6 kg, during the first month of dialysis, required to reach dry weight. Nearly 64% of the patients presented high blood pressure (> 140/90 mmHg) when starting dialysis despite antihypertensive therapy (mean: 2.3 drugs). The outcome of this type II diabetes population was dramatic: 32% (27/84) died after a mean follow-up of 211 days, mostly from cardiovascular diseases. The rate of recovery of renal function was low in both the acute and the acutely aggravated renal failure group (30% and 24%, respectively). Of note, iatrogenic nephrotoxic agents accounted for renal function impairment in nearly 30% of patients. CONCLUSION: Our observational study illustrates the high burden of cardiovascular diseases contrasting with sub-optimal cardiovascular therapeutic interventions in type II diabetes patients entering dialysis. Factors aggravating renal failure were mainly iatrogenic, and therefore largely avoidable. Late referral generally implied a poor clinical condition at the start of dialysis.  (+info)

(7/16781) Increased insulin sensitivity and obesity resistance in mice lacking the protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B gene.

Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B) has been implicated in the negative regulation of insulin signaling. Disruption of the mouse homolog of the gene encoding PTP-1B yielded healthy mice that, in the fed state, had blood glucose concentrations that were slightly lower and concentrations of circulating insulin that were one-half those of their PTP-1B+/+ littermates. The enhanced insulin sensitivity of the PTP-1B-/- mice was also evident in glucose and insulin tolerance tests. The PTP-1B-/- mice showed increased phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in liver and muscle tissue after insulin injection in comparison to PTP-1B+/+ mice. On a high-fat diet, the PTP-1B-/- and PTP-1B+/- mice were resistant to weight gain and remained insulin sensitive, whereas the PTP-1B+/+ mice rapidly gained weight and became insulin resistant. These results demonstrate that PTP-1B has a major role in modulating both insulin sensitivity and fuel metabolism, thereby establishing it as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity.  (+info)

(8/16781) Angiotensin II receptor type 1 gene expression in human glomerulonephritis and diabetes mellitus.

The renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the progression of chronic renal disease. Although the expression of renin and angiotensin-converting enzyme in experimental and human renal disease has been well characterized, no information is available regarding human angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor expression. The net effect of renin depends on AT1 receptor expression, among other factors. Receptor expression was determined in renal biopsy samples (including all tissue components) and isolated glomeruli from patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) or diabetic nephropathy (non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Biopsy samples and isolated glomeruli from tumor-free tissue from tumor nephrectomies served as controls. Human AT1 receptor gene expression was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, using an AT1 receptor deletion mutant as the internal standard. In whole biopsy samples from 37 patients with various types of GN, AT1 receptor mRNA levels were lower, compared with nine control biopsy samples (P < 0.001). AT1 receptor mRNA levels were also significantly lower (P < 0.001) in eight samples from patients with diabetic nephropathy. In microdissected glomeruli, AT1 receptor gene expression was significantly lower in samples from patients (n = 22) with various types of GN, compared with 12 microdissected tumor nephrectomy control samples (P < 0.0023). It is concluded that AT1 receptor mRNA expression is low in glomeruli of patients with chronic renal disease. This may reflect a regulatory response to (inappropriately) high intrarenal angiotensin II concentrations.  (+info)