Loading...
(1/259) Management of extensive carious lesions in permanent molars of a child with nonmetallic bonded restorations--a case report.

The badly decayed molar teeth of a 12-year-old were restored using resin composite and ceramic restorations. The maxillary first left permanent molar, which had an extensive carious lesion that had destroyed most of the coronal hard tissues of the tooth, was restored to shape and function with a heat-treated resin composite onlay restoration. The restoration was followed up for two years. The mandibular right first molar had a failing large amalgam restoration with extensive recurrent caries. After a three-month period of pulp-capping, the tooth was restored with a bonded ceramic onlay restoration. A nine-month follow-up of this restoration is provided. The maxillary right first molar, which also had a failing large amalgam/resin composite restoration, was restored with a direct resin composite restoration. Under traditional treatment regimens, these extensive cavities would have been treated using more invasive procedures such as pin-retained restorations or elective root canal therapy, post placement, core build-up and crowning. Bonded non-metallic restorations avoid the trauma, time and cost that accompany such extensive procedures and offer a more conservative approach.  (+info)

(2/259) The outcome of root canal treatment. A retrospective study within the armed forces (Royal Air Force).

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the outcome of conventional root canal treatment in a general practice setting within the Royal Air Force dental service. Design Retrospective review. METHODS: Teeth that had been root-filled for 12 months or more by Royal Air Force dental practitioners in patients attending a large Royal Air Force dental centre were included in the study. Following clinical and radiographic review the root fillings were classified as 'definitely successful', 'probably successful' or 'failed' The effect on success of several variables on the outcome was investigated. RESULTS: Out of a total of 406 teeth, 59% were maxillary teeth and 41% were mandibular teeth. Sixty-nine per cent of the total sample had pre-existing periapical radiolucencies. Cold lateral condensation of gutta-percha was the most widely used filling technique (64% of all cases). Fifty per cent of the teeth had root fillings within 2 mm of the radiographic apex, 32% were greater than 2 mm from the radiographic apex and 18% were overfilled. Cold lateral condensation was the most successful (92% overall) filling technique. Maxillary anterior teeth had a better success rate (96%) than other tooth types. Teeth with pre-existing periapical radiolucencies had a higher success rate (87%) than those cases where there was no pre-existing periapical radiolucency (80%). Root fillings that were less than 2 mm from the radiographic apex of the tooth had a higher success rate (88% overall) than those that were greater than 2 mm from the radiographic apex (77% overall). Of the 406 cases, 57% (n=231) were classified as definitely successful, 28% (n=114) were classified as probably successful and 15% (n=62) were classified as failures. Thus, the overall success rate combining definitely successful and probably successful root fillings was 85% (n=344). CONCLUSIONS: Root fillings placed using cold lateral condensation of gutta-percha to within 2 mm of the radiographic apex of the tooth were associated with the best outcome.  (+info)

(3/259) Restoration of endodontically treated teeth with carbon fibre posts--a prospective study.

BACKGROUND: A prospective study was started in 1995 to evaluate the success of carbon fibre reinforced epoxy resin (CFRR) posts used to restore endodontically treated teeth. All the teeth in the study had lost more than 50% of their coronal structure. METHODS: Fifty-nine carbon fibre Composiposts cemented with Metabond and built up with Core Paste cores were placed into the teeth of 47 patients. Each tooth received a full-coverage restoration (porcelain fused to metal crown) and was followed for 6.7-45.4 months (average = 28.0 months, standard deviation = 10.7). RESULTS: Results for 52 teeth in 42 patients were analyzed. There were no fractures. The overall failure rate was 7.7% and the cumulative survival rate was 89.6% at the end of the follow-up period. The only statistically significant finding (p = 0.04) was that posts in lower premolars were at higher risk of failure. CONCLUSION: CFRR posts are among the most predictable systems available today. CFRR posts in the upper anterior teeth are associated with a higher success rate and longer life than those placed in premolars, especially lower premolars. This study contributes to the growing body of evidence that supports the use of CFRR posts in the restoration of endodontically treated teeth.  (+info)

(4/259) Clinical performance of a condensable metal-reinforced glass ionomer cement in primary molars.

OBJECTIVE: Aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical suitability of the condensable metal-reinforced glass ionomer cement Hi-Dense in classes I and II cavities of primary molars. METHODS: Seventeen children received a total of fifty four Hi-Dense fillings (nineteen class I and thirty five class II). The restorations were clinically assessed at baseline, after one and after two years of clinical service according to modified USPHS codes and criteria. The restorations were replicated in each recall and representative samples were qualitatively analysed under a SEM. RESULTS: Over the observation period of two years, five restorations failed due to total retention loss, two fillings needed replacement because of persisting hypersensitivity, one filling was lost because of an unsuccessful endodontic treatment, and four restorations remained intact until natural exfoliation (Two year survival rate: 92% for Class I and 66% for Class II). The SEM analysis of surfaces and marginal areas exhibited an inferior adhesive performance primarily in proximal areas, whereas a negative step formation due to wear was frequently observed in occlusal parts. CONCLUSIONS: The results clearly indicate that the condensable, metal-reinforced GIC Hi-Dense reveals no enhanced performance and lifetime expectancy for class II restorations in primary molars when compared to other non-resin-modified GICs.  (+info)

(5/259) A multi-centre study of Osseotite implants supporting mandibular restorations: a 3-year report.

This multi-centre study evaluated the performance of the Osseotite implant in the mandibular arch. Osseotite implants (n = 688) were placed in 172 patients; 43.5% were placed in the anterior mandible and 66.5% in the posterior mandible. Fifteen per cent of the implants were placed in soft bone, 56.9% in normal bone and 28.1% in dense bone. During placement, 49.9% of the implants were identified as having a tight fit, 48.6% a firm fit and 1.5% a loose fit. About one-third of the implants (32.4%) were short (10 mm in length or less). After 36 months, only 5 implants had been lost, for a cumulative survival rate of 99.3%. The 3-year results of this study indicate a high degree of predictability with placement of Osseotite implants in the mandibular arch.  (+info)

(6/259) Fatigue of restorative materials.

Failure due to fatigue manifests itself in dental prostheses and restorations as wear, fractured margins, delaminated coatings, and bulk fracture. Mechanisms responsible for fatigue-induced failure depend on material ductility: Brittle materials are susceptible to catastrophic failure, while ductile materials utilize their plasticity to reduce stress concentrations at the crack tip. Because of the expense associated with the replacement of failed restorations, there is a strong desire on the part of basic scientists and clinicians to evaluate the resistance of materials to fatigue in laboratory tests. Test variables include fatigue-loading mode and test environment, such as soaking in water. The outcome variable is typically fracture strength, and these data typically fit the Weibull distribution. Analysis of fatigue data permits predictive inferences to be made concerning the survival of structures fabricated from restorative materials under specified loading conditions. Although many dental-restorative materials are routinely evaluated, only limited use has been made of fatigue data collected in vitro: Wear of materials and the survival of porcelain restorations has been modeled by both fracture mechanics and probabilistic approaches. A need still exists for a clinical failure database and for the development of valid test methods for the evaluation of composite materials.  (+info)

(7/259) Changing patterns and the need for quality.

This series of articles is aimed at anybody who places crowns and other extra-coronal restorations (ie veneers and shims) on individual teeth. We hope that everyone from experienced practitioners to undergraduate students may find something of value. Whoever reads them, we would ask to do so with an open mind. We have tried not to be dogmatic, and the techniques and materials described are not the only ones available, but are the ones which accord with the principles we describe.  (+info)

(8/259) Implant prosthodontic management of anterior partial edentulism: long-term follow-up of a prospective study.

OBJECTIVE: This paper reports on the long-term outcome of patients with Kennedy Class IV partial edentulism treated in the Implant Prosthodontic Unit (IPU) at the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. METHODS: The information for this paper was gathered from the charts of the first 30 consecutive, partially edentulous patients treated at the IPU. These patients all had Class IV edentulism and formed part of the original prospective clinical studies that were initiated in 1983. The patients' dental history suggested maladaptive experiences with traditional removable prostheses or a reluctance to have intact or quasi-intact teeth prepared as retainers for fixed prostheses. Fifteen men and 15 women treated with 94 Br nemark dental implants, supporting 34 prostheses, were followed until June 2000 (25 patients) or until they were lost to follow-up (5 patients). The multiple missing teeth occurred in 19 maxillae and 15 mandibles. RESULTS: The original prosthodontic treatments were intended to result in 33 fixed partial prostheses and 1 overdenture. At the time of this report, 25 patients with 86 implants supporting 31 fixed prostheses and 3 overdentures had been followed for an average of 12 years (range 7 16 years). The overall survival of implants was 92%. The difference between men (94%) and women (89%) was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: This report is an interim update on an ongoing long-term prospective study. The results so far demonstrate a high survival rate for Br nemark implants supporting tissue-integrated prostheses for the management of anterior partial edentulism.  (+info)