A pilot study of the efficacy of oral midazolam for sedation in pediatric dental patients. (1/130)

Oral midazolam is being used for conscious sedation in dentistry with little documentation assessing its efficacy. In order to accumulate preliminary data, a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover, multi-site pilot study was conducted. The objective was to determine if 0.6 mg/kg of oral midazolam was an equally effective or superior means of achieving conscious sedation in the uncooperative pediatric dental patient, compared with a commonly used agent, 50 mg/kg of oral chloral hydrate. Twenty-three children in three clinics who required dentistry with local anesthetic and were determined to exhibit behavior rated as "negative" or "definitely negative" based on the Frankl scale were assessed. They were evaluated with respect to acceptance of medication; initial level of anxiety at each appointment; level of sedation prior to and acceptance of local anesthetic; movement and crying during the procedure; and overall behavior. The results showed that the group randomly assigned to receive midazolam had a significantly greater initial level of anxiety for that appointment (P < 0.02), a finding that could clearly confound further determination of the efficacy of these drugs. Patients given oral midazolam had an increased level of sedation prior to the administration of local anesthetic compared with those given chloral hydrate (P < 0.015). No statistically significant differences were noted in any of the other parameters. The age of the patient was found to have no correlation with the difference in overall behavior (r = -0.09). These preliminary data warrant further clinical trials.  (+info)

Intranasal midazolam plasma concentration profile and its effect on anxiety associated with dental procedures. (2/130)

The objectives of this study were to describe the serum concentration time profile for midazolam following intranasal administration to adult dental surgery patients and to ascertain the effect of midazolam on anxiety. Six female patients received a single 20 mg (0.32 to 0.53 mg/kg) dose of midazolam. Blood samples were collected at 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 60 min following dose administration. Midazolam plasma concentrations were determined by gas chromatography. Anxiety was evaluated using a 100-mm visual analogue scale. The maximum concentration of midazolam was reached 25.8 min (range 18 to 35 min) following dose administration. Maximum concentrations were variable. However, there was no relationship between the weight-adjusted dose and maximal concentration. Patients experiencing baseline anxiety exhibited a trend toward reduction in their measured anxiety score (P = 0.06). Plasma concentrations above the hypothesized minimum effective concentration for sedative effects were attained when midazolam was administered intranasally to adult dental patients.  (+info)

Dental fear among university students: implications for pharmacological research. (3/130)

University students are often subjects in randomized clinical trials involving anxiolytic and analgesic medications used during clinical dental and medical procedures. The purpose of this study was to describe a typical university student population available for research by using data from a mail survey. Subjects were 350 students chosen randomly from all enrolled, full-time, traditional students on the main campus at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA. The aim was to determine the extent and nature of dental anxiety in this population. In addition, the relationships between subject willingness to receive dental injections and general and mental health and medical avoidance and medical fears were examined. The Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) was used to measure dental anxiety. Dental anxiety was prevalent in this population; 19% of students reported high rates of dental fear. Thirteen percent of students had never had a dental injection. Students with no experience with dental injections were more reluctant than those with experience to receive an injection if one were needed. DAS scores were correlated with injection reluctance. Students who were reluctant to go ahead with a dental injection also reported poorer general and mental health than those who were less reluctant. These students also reported higher medical avoidance and medical anxiety scores. University students provide a rich source of potential subjects for clinical research. The student population, like the community at large, contains people with high levels of dental and medical fear.  (+info)

Dental anesthetic management of a patient with ventricular arrhythmias. (4/130)

During routine deep sedation for endodontic therapy, a dentist-anesthesiologist observed premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) on a 62-yr-old woman's electrocardiogram (EKG) tracing. The dentist was able to complete the root canal procedure under intravenous (i.v.) sedation without any problems. The dentist-anesthesiologist referred the patient for medical evaluation. She was found to be free from ischemic cardiac disease with normal ventricular function. The patient was cleared to continue her dental treatment with deep sedation. She subsequently continued to undergo dental treatment with deep intravenous sedation without incident, although her EKG exhibited frequent PVCs, up to 20 per minute, including couplets and episodes of trigeminy. This article will review indications for medical intervention, antiarrhythmic medications, and anesthetic interventions for perioperative PVCs.  (+info)

Factors predictive of anxiety before oral surgery: efficacy of various subject screening measures. (5/130)

Recruiting anxious people for analgesic and anxiolytic studies allows greater opportunities to study the positive effects of anxiolytic medication. The purpose of this study is to describe a population recruited for a study of anxiolytic medication using the third molar model and to evaluate the relative efficacy of different measures of dental anxiety as recruitment tools. A concerted effort was made to recruit anxious subjects. The following measures were tested: Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS), Litt's Oral Surgery Confidence Questionnaire (OSCQ), and Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The influence of prior experience with tooth extractions on anxiety was also assessed. Subjects who had previously experienced tooth extraction reported higher anxiety before oral surgery than did subjects without such experience. DAS, DFS and state anxiety scores correlated with anxiety reported before oral surgery. However, OSCQ scores and trait anxiety were not related to anxiety reported before surgery. Linear regression indicated that the DFS predicted anxiety before oral surgery best of all measures that were used. Kleinknecht's DFS is thus recommended for use as a tool for recruiting anxious patients.  (+info)

Dental attendance in 1998 and implications for the future. (6/130)

The 1998 survey of Adult Dental Health in the UK was carried out under the auspices of the Office of National Statistics together with the Universities of Birmingham, Dundee, Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Wales. A key behavioural indicator in these decennial surveys is whether people say they go to a dentist for a regular dental check-up, an occasional dental check-up or only when they have trouble with their teeth. The proportion of dentate adults in the UK who report attending for regular dental check-ups has risen from 43% in 1978 to 59% in 1998. Older adults (over 55 years old) in 1998 were the most likely to say they attend for regular dental check-ups. Many younger adults (16-24) in 1998 said they went to a dentist less often than 5 years previously, they were also the least likely to say they attend for regular dental check-ups. Dental anxiety remains a problem for many dental patients but another factor of importance to many is their want to be involved in the treatment process and especially to be given an estimate of treatment costs.  (+info)

A joint approach to treating dental phobics between community dental services and specialist psychotherapy services--a single case report. (7/130)

A 41-year-old male patient presented at the local dental hospital requesting treatment under IV sedation, a treatment that he had had for the past 25 years. The patient was referred to the specialist psychotherapy services for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and received a 1 hour course of therapy. He was then introduced to dental services, and at this visit had a check-up, OPG, and treatment planning discussion. At a subsequent visit he had local anaesthetic, three fillings, and a scale and polish. The patient is now able to return to general dental practice, after only a brief therapeutic intervention, and subsequent dental treatment. The present and future cost saving to the NHS is substantial compared with the treatment method initially sought by the patient.  (+info)

A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, comparative study of topical skin analgesics and the anxiety and discomfort associated with venous cannulation. (8/130)

OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of topical skin anaesthetic agents on the discomfort and anxiety associated with venous cannulation. DESIGN: Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within subject, volunteer trial. METHODS: 20 healthy volunteers underwent venous cannulation on three separate occasions having received topical skin application of either 4% amethocaine gel (Ametop), 5% eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) or E45 cream (placebo). Visual analogue and verbal rating scales were used to assess pain and anxiety associated with the venous cannulation, and anticipated anxiety for future cannulation, under each drug condition. RESULTS: Subjects were aged 22-53 years (mean 32.8 years). The mean visual analogue scores (VAS) for discomfort were found to be significantly lower (p< 0.001) with Ametop (VAS = 18mm) and EMLA (VAS = 29mm) compared with the control (VAS = 38mm). There was a positive correlation (R2 = 72%, p<0.001) between discomfort and the predicted anxiety if cannulation was to be repeated with the same cream. With the placebo a positive correlation (R2 = 19.8%, p = 0.05) was found between the level of anxiety before cannulation and the level of discomfort recorded. CONCLUSIONS: Ametop and EMLA topical anaesthetic agents produce effective skin analgesia for venous cannulation. The use of topical analgesia can reduce perceived anxiety about future cannulation procedures. This has application in the management of anxious patients undergoing intravenous sedation, suggesting that topical analgesia prior to venous cannulation may significantly aid anxiolysis.  (+info)